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Congratulations on Your Military Service… Now Here Are 9 Reasons Why I Won’t Hire You

daftandbarmy

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Thanks @daftandbarmy for posting these insights for those of us who joined the CAF straight out of school. As I near my retirement in the next couple of years it has started to become apparent how unprepared for the "outside" I am.

It's a good heads up for anyone, not just CAF members, of course. It's too bad we just push people through SCAN seminars and say 'bye bye' once we're done with them though.

The CAF is potentially a great start for people who can go on to do even greater things after their military service. A better 'interface service' between uniformed and civilian life wouldn't be hard, or too expensive, to set up.
 

Weinie

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A 70% pension is considered the benchmark for working Canadians. That's what OMERS pays, and from what my sister told me, the CAF does also.

Does anyone who stayed in for the whole ride ( 70% ) feel the need for post-retirement employment?
Some of us who started having kids late (60 in two months) and have a 14,12,9 and 3 year old feel the need for any employment. Kids cost a lot.
 

mariomike

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Some of us who started having kids late (60 in two months) and have a 14,12,9 and 3 year old feel the need for any employment. Kids cost a lot.
Of course everyone's financial situation is different. 70% is considered the benchmark for most working Canadians from what I have read. Which is why the pensions max out at 70%.

But, in OMERS ( and maybe the CAF too? ), if 70% is not enough, they just keeping working at full pay ( while increasing their pension at the accrual rate if they want to take it all the way up to 100%. )

I've known a few guys who for whatever reasons stayed on the job after they had maxed out. But, they did not change employers.
 

daftandbarmy

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A 70% pension is considered the benchmark for working Canadians. That's what OMERS pays, and from what my sister told me, the CAF does also.

Does anyone who stayed in for the whole ride ( 70% ) feel the need for post-retirement employment?

My unit is full of retired CAF Officers who look like they need the Class A income. I suppose it’s based on individual situations of course.
 

Weinie

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Of course everyone's financial situation is different. 70% is considered the benchmark for most working Canadians from what I have read. Which is why the pensions max out at 70%.

But, in OMERS ( and maybe the CAF too? ), if 70% is not enough, they just keeping working at full pay ( while increasing their pension at the accrual rate if they want to take it all the way up to 100%. )

I've known a few guys who for whatever reasons stayed on the job after they had maxed out. But, they did not change employers.
We (CAF) max at 70%. Although I and my family could survive on my pension, like I said above, my kids are growing progressively more expensive. So, next job beckons. I would like to give them more options than what I had growing up.
 

Good2Golf

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We (CAF) max at 70%. Although I and my family could survive on my pension, like I said above, my kids are growing progressively more expensive. So, next job beckons. I would like to give them more options than what I had growing up.
Weinie, I have a friend whose daughter got into horse jumping. Don’t be him. 😉
 

Weinie

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Weinie, I have a friend whose daughter got into horse jumping. Don’t be him. 😉
I too, have a friend like that, and it almost bankrupted him.

We try to be open to proposals, but judicious in approvals.
 

SupersonicMax

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Of course everyone's financial situation is different. 70% is considered the benchmark for most working Canadians from what I have read. Which is why the pensions max out at 70%.

Maybe for boomers but for every other generations, just having a pension is considered a win. Besides government jobs, I would bet there aren't too many employers offering lifelong defined benefit pensions after retirement.
 

lenaitch

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We (CAF) max at 70%. Although I and my family could survive on my pension, like I said above, my kids are growing progressively more expensive. So, next job beckons. I would like to give them more options than what I had growing up.
Our lifestyle always seems to rise (or fall) to our income level). I retired at 62% of my police salary and had two part-time jobs; mostly to stay active. I didn't want to make lawn whirly-gigs in my basement. When we bought our small farm, spare time left my vocabulary, but I suppose it paid off when we sold it ten years later.
Weinie, I have a friend whose daughter got into horse jumping. Don’t be him. 😉
It is an expensive hobby - at that's all it is for the vast majority. We got our daughter her first horse at age 7. She progressed into the hunter-jumper circuits where you win ribbons and the odd trophy. Most horses are relatively cheap to buy, but expensive to keep. On the other hand, I had (have) a motorcycle; expensive to buy, relatively cheap to keep, so I guess I couldn't complain. It was good for her. Living in the country meant she didn't grow up with nearby friends and we moved four times between her birth and highschool. I don't begrudge it but you gotta have your eyes open. You either pay board or have facilities at home (we had both), then tack, vet bills, lessons, a trailer for shows, insurance, yada, yada.
 

Kat Stevens

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A 70% pension is considered the benchmark for working Canadians. That's what OMERS pays, and from what my sister told me, the CAF does also.

Does anyone who stayed in for the whole ride ( 70% ) feel the need for post-retirement employment?
There’s not a single chance in hell I could have put my feet up after I retired.

sorry, misread, I didn’t ride it to the end of the line, doctors had other ideas.
 

mariomike

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sorry, misread, I didn’t ride it to the end of the line, doctors had other ideas.
Our Permanently Partially Disabled ( PPD ) members were placed in a "suitable" job with the City. If you can blink your eyes, they'll find you something to do.

Employees who are placed in a permanent alternate position, due to an occupational injury/illness (as defined by the Workplace Safety & Insurance Board), will be subject to the normal assessment period and will receive the wage rate of the position to which they are assigned. If the pre-injury rate of pay is higher than the relocated position rate, then the pre-injury rate is to be maintained. It is understood that the pre-injury rate is subject to all wage increases negotiated.

This was the important part:

If the pre-injury rate of pay is higher than the relocated position rate, then the pre-injury rate is to be maintained. It is understood that the pre-injury rate is subject to all wage increases negotiated.
 

Good2Golf

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It is an expensive hobby - at that's all it is for the vast majority. We got our daughter her first horse at age 7. She progressed into the hunter-jumper circuits where you win ribbons and the odd trophy. Most horses are relatively cheap to buy, but expensive to keep. On the other hand, I had (have) a motorcycle; expensive to buy, relatively cheap to keep, so I guess I couldn't complain. It was good for her. Living in the country meant she didn't grow up with nearby friends and we moved four times between her birth and highschool. I don't begrudge it but you gotta have your eyes open. You either pay board or have facilities at home (we had both), then tack, vet bills, lessons, a trailer for shows, insurance, yada, yada.
He half-joked about filling “Ferrari”’s feed bag with $100 bills...joked about the $100 bills, but the horse was called Ferrari...named
After the car he would never have because of the horse. 😆
 

GR66

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Of course everyone's financial situation is different. 70% is considered the benchmark for most working Canadians from what I have read. Which is why the pensions max out at 70%.

But, in OMERS ( and maybe the CAF too? ), if 70% is not enough, they just keeping working at full pay ( while increasing their pension at the accrual rate if they want to take it all the way up to 100%. )

I've known a few guys who for whatever reasons stayed on the job after they had maxed out. But, they did not change employers.
Pension? What's a pension?

Would love to have a government job with a pension plan...not many other employers these days that offer that to employees.
 

mariomike

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Pension? What's a pension?

Would love to have a government job with a pension plan...not many other employers these days that offer that to employees.
Right. I imagine those who do would consider very carefully before voluntarily releasing for another job - unless the new employer had a pension transfer agreement.
 

blacktriangle

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I imagine those who do would consider very carefully before voluntarily releasing for another job - unless the new employer had a pension transfer agreement.
In the last year or so, I can think of three people who were at 25+ years of service, that died and never got to collect their pension. It definitely opened my eyes, and reminded me to be thankful for what I have in the here and now.
 

daftandbarmy

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In the last year or so, I can think of three people who were at 25+ years of service, that died and never got to collect their pension. It definitely opened my eyes, and reminded me to be thankful for what I have in the here and now.
Happy Sunday Church GIF by TV One
 

FormerHorseGuard

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I got out, and it was hard to pick up and start again. I was proud of my past being in the Canadian Forces. But to be honest I only have the job I have today because of my military background. Twice my former training and thought process worked to save my employers a lot of money because I could handle a crisis without panic and without management support. A tornado took out most of the cell communications, I was one of the few who lived outside the area who was able to respond and do damage control. Second time was major building flood, as I drove in to the site, ( using my bluetooth handsfree ) , I was able to arrange the various contractors to start clean up operations before I was even on site. One question I was asked about during my job interview was, Overtime and working it. I smiled and said you pay overtime? The employer knows I will come to work, be there and do whatever it takes to get the job done. Worry about the other stuff later. That is one of the great reasons to hire ex military, we will work and make things happen.
 

Eaglelord17

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Pensions in the private sector are basically all defined contributions if they are there at all now.

It mainly comes down to how you manage your money. For example if I work to 65 where I am at I shall receive a pension of about 1/3 my annual income. The Company pays about 2.85$ a hour worked into the pension and thats it for us. So the result is I need to save more money for retirement than a public sector employee would.

I have family members who have retired with full CF pensions and have squandered it all, living pay cheque to pay cheque (the only fortunate thing being those cheques are consistent). But receiving 70% of your income made well in the CAF is a fantastic thing and certainly a lot more than most receive for retirement.
 

lenaitch

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Being non-military, the one thing that I have repeatedly read on this site that strikes me as bizarre is the often protracted lag between the last CAF paycheque and the first pension cheque and benefits kick-in. Provided reasonable notice is given, the financial transition should be seamless (sure - I've known members who have got up and walked out the door but they are outliers). It strikes me as simply a bureaucratic failure.
 

daftandbarmy

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I got out, and it was hard to pick up and start again. I was proud of my past being in the Canadian Forces. But to be honest I only have the job I have today because of my military background. Twice my former training and thought process worked to save my employers a lot of money because I could handle a crisis without panic and without management support. A tornado took out most of the cell communications, I was one of the few who lived outside the area who was able to respond and do damage control. Second time was major building flood, as I drove in to the site, ( using my bluetooth handsfree ) , I was able to arrange the various contractors to start clean up operations before I was even on site. One question I was asked about during my job interview was, Overtime and working it. I smiled and said you pay overtime? The employer knows I will come to work, be there and do whatever it takes to get the job done. Worry about the other stuff later. That is one of the great reasons to hire ex military, we will work and make things happen.

How did you get hired by a civilian employer? Sounds like yours is a great example of a success story some could learn from!
 
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