Domestic and Arctic Mobility Enhancement Project

Colin Parkinson

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A good news story that speaks partly to what we are talking about http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/thunder-bay/teen-first-nation-drinking-water-1.3563110
 

Kirkhill

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Good on the youngster. I hope they can figure out how to maintain a dozen just like him.  As we've noted before, the issue is not just one of supplying the plant but of finding the people to operate and maintain it.  And allowing people to take pride in their efforts.
 

The Bread Guy

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Chris Pook said:
Good on the youngster. I hope they can figure out how to maintain a dozen just like him.  As we've noted before, the issue is not just one of supplying the plant but of finding the people to operate and maintain it.  And allowing people to take pride in their efforts.
And ensuring the pool of such keeners grows to avoid having only a few keeners getting so good that they get poached away to bigger, higher-paying jobs without leaving keen replacements behind.
 

a_majoor

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WRT an airbridge to the high arctic, there might be some opportunity for a cost sharing arrangement. There are plenty of bush pilots still operating around the sort with everything from surplus C-130's retired from the USAF to DC-3's and smaller aircraft.

If the Canadian Government were to supply the airframes and a bit of basic infrastructure in the north for private operators in return for these carriers being "on call" for government work, we could have a standardized fleet of aircraft and pool of trained operators ready to go at short notice. While it might be nice to spring for dozens of C-130's, those aircraft might not be economical for private operators (mostly because it is probably difficult to fill the cargo hold with paying freight for a plane that size). Some of the smaller transport planes that vendors have been flogging for the FWSAR would probably be the 80% solution.

 
J

jollyjacktar

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I'll throw it here as it's a winter use vehicle adaptation.  On display at the Polaris booth at CANSEC was this motorcycle called a Timbersled.  I can see this being the wet dream of all sorts of soldiers.

 

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a_majoor

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Oddly, I was on the same website, but came across a different vehicle. The Standard 8X8 chassis was developed as a private venture to build a family of high mobility cross country vehicles. One of the first demonstrated was a vehicle carrying a 20mm Vulcan cannon for SHORAD (the same cannon carried by the M-163), but the concept was expanded to include proposals for transport trucks, artillery prime movers and so on.

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/21002/excalibur-was-a-vulcan-gatling-gun-wielding-air-defense-vehicle-straight-out-of-g-i-joe

With wider diameter tires (or even very enlarged "Rollagon" type wheels) it probably would make for a cheaper MTV, and as a "Family of vehicles" would provide that logistical commonality and economy of scale when buying and using them.

 

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GK .Dundas

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Thucydides said:
Oddly, I was on the same website, but came across a different vehicle. The Standard 8X8 chassis was developed as a private venture to build a family of high mobility cross country vehicles. One of the first demonstrated was a vehicle carrying a 20mm Vulcan cannon for SHORAD (the same cannon carried by the M-163), but the concept was expanded to include proposals for transport trucks, artillery prime movers and so on.

http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/21002/excalibur-was-a-vulcan-gatling-gun-wielding-air-defense-vehicle-straight-out-of-g-i-joe

With wider diameter tires (or even very enlarged "Rollagon" type wheels) it probably would make for a cheaper MTV, and as a "Family of vehicles" would provide that logistical commonality and economy of scale when buying and using them.
Further to your posting,for your perusal and comment.
https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/supacat-terrain-mobility-platform-atmp/

https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/multidrive-vehicles/

https://www.thinkdefence.co.uk/esarco-vehicles/
 

daftandbarmy

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One of the best all terrain vehicles I've seen in action in the arctic is the Leopard tank, which the Germans designed to go all the way to Moscow in case of 'Eastern Front II'.

Just sayin'  ;)
 

Colin Parkinson

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The CB-90 is supposed to be quite good in snow as well https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZR37pYAA0HY
 

Kirkhill

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Bump - Bv206 replacement programme

The [US] Army is looking for a new all-around vehicle that can swim, climb and charge through snow
By: Todd South     17 hours ago




BAE Systems is one company vying to replace the more than 40-year-old tracked, Small Unit Support Vehicle for the Army, Marines and National Guard. They're offering the modernized BvS10, which comes in armored and unarmored versions. (BAE Systems)

After more than 40 years of service, the robust little all-terrain vehicle that can climb mountains, ford rivers and churn through snow needs replacing.

And the Army, Marines and National Guard are asking industry to give them a new ride.

Back in June, Army Contracting Command officials put out a Request for Information for industry to share what they think can replace the Small Unit Support Vehicle, a tracked vehicle that’s been in service since the mid-1970s.

At one point, there were 1,100 of them in the U.S. military inventory. Now, only a few dozen remain, mostly in service in cold weather areas such as U.S. Army Alaska.

The new program to replace the SUSV has been dubbed the “Joint All Weather All Terrain Support Vehicle," or JAASV.

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/08/30/the-army-is-looking-for-a-new-all-around-vehicle-that-can-swim-climb-and-charge-through-snow/
 

LoboCanada

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Just licence out 500 to someone in Canada for extra $, its not like you can't use these everywhere.

What ever happened to this project? Not supposed to even start til 2020/2021 but I read of different tests and experiments of Light Over Snow Vehicles?
 

daftandbarmy

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Chris Pook said:
Bump - Bv206 replacement programme

https://www.armytimes.com/news/your-army/2018/08/30/the-army-is-looking-for-a-new-all-around-vehicle-that-can-swim-climb-and-charge-through-snow/

We used these a lot in Norway in the winter, and they are awesome.  :nod:
 

Blackadder1916

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Colin P said:
No doubt we are going to attempt to recreate Bobcat 2.0

What's wrong with that?  The original Bobcat did go into production . . . of a sort.
 

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a_majoor

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Reviving an old thread, based on an interesting article from Strategypage:


While a nuclear powered, semi icebreaker LASH (Lighters Aboard Ship) might be a bit much, given the extreme conditions that it is ment to operate under, the Sevmorput is perhaps the most reasonable solution possible for the arctic. Certainly Canada is now moving towards developing small, modular nuclear powerplants, so we could indeed go that way if desired, but even without nuclear power, this type of ship seems ideal to provide logistics support to the far North for most of the year. The use of on board lighters allows you to send supplies even into shallow waters, and the Sevmorput also has several on board cranes so it can transfer cargo containers and other supplies and equipment to a dock as well.

One thing that "we" collectively don't have a real handle on is how to support large scale operations in the arctic. Thinking about ships like this could be one way to extend our reach.
 

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quadrapiper

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Reviving an old thread, based on an interesting article from Strategypage:


While a nuclear powered, semi icebreaker LASH (Lighters Aboard Ship) might be a bit much, given the extreme conditions that it is ment to operate under, the Sevmorput is perhaps the most reasonable solution possible for the arctic. Certainly Canada is now moving towards developing small, modular nuclear powerplants, so we could indeed go that way if desired, but even without nuclear power, this type of ship seems ideal to provide logistics support to the far North for most of the year. The use of on board lighters allows you to send supplies even into shallow waters, and the Sevmorput also has several on board cranes so it can transfer cargo containers and other supplies and equipment to a dock as well.

One thing that "we" collectively don't have a real handle on is how to support large scale operations in the arctic. Thinking about ships like this could be one way to extend our reach.

Desgagnés runs with embarked barges (can't remember if any are powered) and tugs for Northern resupply.
 
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