Depart with Dignity

Pat in Halifax

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It must vary from environment to environment and or Base/Unit to Base/Unit. They were all big events (even for some of the 'less' popular individuals) when I was still home in Halifax and were generally well attended. Here in Ottawa now, the few I have attended, same thing. When you are retiring, it is your 'right' to ask a co-worker to coordinate your DWD ceremony. There are more than enough samples floating around as well as the constantly updated Aide Memoire. If unsatisfied, I don't care your rank, go through your Div system and ask to see your Unit Chief. Getting a handshake out the door at 25 years is immoral and unacceptable and means someone is truly falling down on the job.
 

Popurhedoff

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While I was still in the Military I arranged quite a few of Depart with Dignity with the help of of a good team.  When I retired I had an excellent DwD at the end of my career.

Now my Son was Medicaly released today (PTSD from tour in Afghanistan) and was cast to the curb without even a handshake.  He has not received any assistance from his parent unit and he has a lot of questions.  Since I am not in anymore and trying to help him from Afghanistan I will seek information from the fourms, yes I know I will have lots of reading to do but I don't believe that anyone should end their career like this.

He was Army Infantry reserves (11.8 years) in Halifax.  If I cannot find the answers I will ask some of you for assistance in the future.  I thank you in advance.

Cheers
Pop
 

DAA

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As far as I can see, the DWD Guide only makes reference to "members of the Canadian Forces", so there should be no real distinction between Regular and Reserve and both should be treated equally.  So it sounds like someone dropped the ball...
 

Popurhedoff

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I would like to thank all those who sent me messages with offers of assistance.  I will gladly seek their assistance and help in any way I can as well.

Cheers
Pop
 

brihard

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Popurhedoff said:
I would like to thank all those who sent me messages with offers of assistance.  I will gladly seek their assistance and help in any way I can as well.

Cheers
Pop

Pop- I'm in contact with someone who can at least directly make sure the right people know. I've shot you a PM.
 

Sigs Pig

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Popurhedoff said:
He was Army Infantry reserves (11.8 years) in Halifax.  If I cannot find the answers I will ask some of you for assistance in the future.  I thank you in advance.

Damn, they even threw him out before he could be eligible for the CD.

Godspeed on the tough paths ahead...
ME
 

Future Pensioner

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Does anyone have a copy of the 2005 Depart with Diginity guidelines they can PM me?  I know they were replaced by the 2009 version, but I am specifically looking for the 2005 one.

Much appreciated.
 

kratz

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After 20+ years at 3 NRDs and HQs I am waiting 11 months and counting to after release for a DWD. This does not count the the 10 months prior to release that also separated me from the unit. If you are an Officer or CPO IAW DWD, the mess knows how to deal with you...but if if you are are MS or below...even with 20+ years service, anyone that knows you is promoted out of the mess and so the MS&B ignore you and you walk out with a kick in the ass.
 

Wolfeyez

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Depart with dignity...just a statement?

After 28 years reg force service, I drove out the main gate of my base recently with two handshakes from personnel just hanging around that day and noting else. No certificates of service, no letters, no simple "luncheon". Oh sure, the certificates may be mailed to me at a later date as I am no longer in the area. When I inquired about the possibility of receiving the Canadian flag flown at my base, I received a confused stare and uncertainty as to the process.

As I drove out the main gate, I looked back in the rear view mirror and thought about all the good times, bad times, postings, tours, including the sacrifices my family and I made and the opportunities gained. I then thought about all the depart with dignities I assisted with, had been part of and, unfortunately, some missed. It's funny, in a sad kind of way, how I missed my own. While en route home, I stopped off at a local watering hole, threw a shot "down range" and quietly departed.

I guess, as I create my shadow box, the items I place into it will mean more than that final day.  :yellow:
 

Fishbone Jones

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Been there, done that. I know the feeling. It's time to get hold of your previous Command Team and relay your thoughts directly to them.
 
J

jollyjacktar

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DWD etc is not for everyone.  With luck, my departure will take place this spring.  I've made it abundantly clear, I hope, to my chain that I don't wish to have any fuss whatsoever when I march out the door.  No letters, luncheons or shadowboxes.  They are somewhat puzzled by my request but I hope they respect it.  I'm not bitter or leaving angry, it's just not my thing.  I've even talked previous chains into letting me sign for and slip a medal into my pocket without the fanfare or recognition that goes with it's issue.  Perfect for me and I really appreciated it.

For those who do wish the full monty, so to speak, upon departure, their respective chain is failing them if they don't deliver.  Shameful lack of professionalism on their part.
 

V_I_Lenin

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Wolfeyez,

Depart with dignity...More than just a statement!

After 26 years of Regular Force service, "book-ended" by two years before and two years after as a Reserve member of the Communications and Electronics Branch, I said farewell to my military career this year with an profound feeling of satisfaction and pride. My Certificate of Service hangs on the wall beside me as I type this, alongside other certificates signed by local politicians all the way up to some people sitting behind expensive desks in Ottawa. The flag flown above the Armoury on my last day of service has it's pride of place in my shadow-box along with the assorted hardware one accumulates after a career spent wearing "SIGNALS" on ones epaulettes. These were awarded to me at a farewell luncheon attended by my friends, family, and the soldiers I've been proud to serve with here in my "last posting".

The organization and legwork involved in my Departure with Dignity was orchestrated by a certain junior officer at my unit, with a huge amount of truly excellent administrative support by a perenially overworked RMS Clerk. And, I suspect, the helpful suggestions of a "crusty" Warrant Officer! In any event, someone will have an easy time writing the PER for young Lt. DXXXXX this year...the narrative under POTENTIAL almost writes itself!

I'm sorry to read that your career came to a close on such a negative note, Wolfeyez...clearly someone dropped the ball. I offer my own experience as an example of how a Departure from military service to Canada was conducted with Dignity.

VVV
 

krustyrl

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Without going into too many personal details having suffered several physical injuries and a mental injury that manifests itself symptom-wise with dis-association and the uneasiness of crowds or the feeling of being singled out,  my DWD after a 3b having served 27+ yrs was rather dis-heartening. Was posted to my IPSC or JPSU whatever it was called from another base/wing.
It was a tight run ship and I understand I was in the military but when asking for time off to get a few things done logistically after a posting, I got more time off needed from my workplace than from JPSU. The place of employment was wayyyy more supportive than JPSU trying to also make a transition out of the CAF so I requested any time off needed thru them without ruffling the feathers of the rulers in JPSU. 

Granted, the JPSU whom were less than understanding or empathetic asked me about my wishes were for my DWD. Not wanting to endure the effects of anxiety, stress and similar symptoms for this , along with my bitterness towards the way I was being treated I was not wanting a "fanfare" especially having someone who doesn't know me as a person. 

I'm finding it hard to focus on writing this so I'll cut right to the chase by saying the JPSU flew my flag at HQ on the totally wrong day citing they were certain it was the day I requested it be flown ( the day it was flown had zero significance to me) whereas I had admittedly changed the dates from my last day in uniform to my 51st birthday.

Then I went in for a very informal presentation of my certificates and all that stuff by the i/c of the JPSU and skeleton staff (which was fine by me) but when my Service pin was pinned on my sweater, sadly it was the wrong pin. Granted I never noticed at the time and brought it to their attention after a couple of weeks to look my booty of parting paperwork over. The Sgt had no idea there were different pins for time served. This location, being a major IPSC/JPSU had no idea about the pins significance.?  I realize I didn't want much of an event but the mandatory things should have been looked over or double checked for correctness as per the checklist of a departing member. The Sgt admitted they "dropped the ball" on my departure but anyone who has taken a SCAN Seminar and stayed for the duration of said seminar should know the difference in pins being it is their duty or primary job. After all, it's not everyday a person leaves the service.  Yes, I should've checked it upon receiving it but I just wanted to get through this for personal reasons.

Apologies if this rant/post is all over the place as I am finding difficulty focussing and it's triggering some negative things for me. Just wanted to put this out there.
 

George Wallace

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krustyrl

Thanks for your post. 

As can be seen, not all DWD ceremonies/gatherings/occasions are the same.  When I left, I was asked if I wanted a flag that was flown on Parliament Hill's Peace Tower, and I thought that was the norm.  Back to the DWD, though, and I think it really depends on what unit and the size of the unit you are Departing from.  That will affect how you are treated.  Another factor is whom that unit may delegate to plan, or carry out your plans, for the Departure.  Some can be rather formal, some are like a Roast, some are simply a gathering at a local watering-hole.  My DWD from the Regs was a surprise to me and happened at the Men's Christmas Dinner.  My DWD from the Reserves, was again a surprise and done at a formal Mess Dinner. 
 

krustyrl

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Thanks George, I agree the DWD events are all different as people wish different types of event.  I guess I was expecting my event to go a bit better being a small one. Aside from the problems I encountered, I drove off the base for the last time thinking of some of the better accomplishments after all these years.  Thank you for your service also.  :cdn:
 

George Wallace

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krustyrl

The friends that you have made during your Service will always remain.  You will find them there when you need them.  Both you and Alan can count on that.

That is one thing about the 'military family' and the bonds you made that will be a source of pleasure and amusement at times.  You will often run into old friends in the most unusual of places.  They are bonds that few others enjoy.
 

krustyrl

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I agree and have maintained contact with some of the old boys. It made the transition that much easier. Thanks again.!
 

Jed

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DWD is important.

My departure from the Reg force was done in stellar fashion and reflected well on the Command team.

My departure from the Res force was absolutely non existent with a certificate being mailed out almost 2 years late as well as arbitrarily being designated Non Effective strength for about 1 week thereby ensuring I was not eligible for a CD1.

I much preferred the first DWD and respect the Chain of Command considerably more. Either way, I continue to serve my country as a good citizen and proud veteran.

 

dapaterson

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Strictly speaking you're only supposed to receive one DWD - changing components is not supposed to trigger one.

 

Jed

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No problem. I would have been happy with farewell beer in the mess.

In all fairness, many folks probably prefer to just fade away.
 
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