New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy

Stoker

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Uzlu said:
https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/polar-icebreaker-shipbuilding-seaspan-davie-1.5834290

Probably the reason why they released this, straight from their propaganda arm.

https://www.facebook.com/afcdcan/videos/3581536445255836

Might have to move the "national icebreaker center" to Vancouver.
 

Oldgateboatdriver

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Navy_Pete said:
Davie was also allowed to bid and not excluded as reported repeatedly; they lost.  :dunno:

Just a small correction, here, Navy_Pete: In last ditch effort just as it got out of Creditor protection under the Bankruptcy Act with new (foreign, BTW) owners, Davie managed to get a chance at putting together a bid for the non-combat part of the NSS (same as the one Seaspan got), and after getting a short extension of deadline, did put in a bid.

However, they did not "lose", they were declared non-compliant because during the protection period, the collective agreement had expired and they did not have a chance to have a new one in place. A collective agreement covering the first five (I believe, or at least four) years from the day the bid went in was a requirement and Davie didn't have one.

I don't call that losing since the technical part of their bid was not even reviewed or considered.

P.S. I used to practice law at the Montreal law firm who handled that for Davie, though not at the time, but I still have good contacts.
 

Navy_Pete

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Oldgateboatdriver said:
Just a small correction, here, Navy_Pete: In last ditch effort just as it got out of Creditor protection under the Bankruptcy Act with new (foreign, BTW) owners, Davie managed to get a chance at putting together a bid for the non-combat part of the NSS (same as the one Seaspan got), and after getting a short extension of deadline, did put in a bid.

However, they did not "lose", they were declared non-compliant because during the protection period, the collective agreement had expired and they did not have a chance to have a new one in place. A collective agreement covering the first five (I believe, or at least four) years from the day the bid went in was a requirement and Davie didn't have one.

I don't call that losing since the technical part of their bid was not even reviewed or considered.

P.S. I used to practice law at the Montreal law firm who handled that for Davie, though not at the time, but I still have good contacts.

That's not true at all; their bid was accepted, evaluated and scored. That included a full technical evaluation, cost review, IRB review/scoring etc.  I spent weeks of my life reviewing all three bids and the evals, not sure what else to tell you. Davie was allowed to bid, was scored, and was an unsuccessful bid because the other two were scored higher. They've spent years trying to control the narrative and make it sound like they would have won but for some pesky bureaucratic loophole, but the fact is they were outbid by both other shipyards. Not sure what else to tell you, but your winger is wrong. :dunno:

Here's a link to a CBC story and a CTV news story about the announcement; you'll notice both include Davie as a bidder and indicate they weren't selected; can't pull up any GoC press releases prior to 2015.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/halifax-b-c-yards-win-shipbuilding-work-1.1000979
https://www.ctvnews.ca/halifax-wins-25-billion-shipbuilding-contract-1.713515


 

JMCanada

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A good feature of both Japanese and Korean shipbuilding structure for their respective Navies is that the two companies do build same ship-classes (and boats): Mitsubishi/Kawasaki heavy industries or Daewoo/Hyundai.

The fact is that we're talking about only one Polar icebreaker, but if we talked about two, it might be of interest to award one to Seaspan and the other to Davie. It would allow (i guess) to make some kind of competition for efficiency and on-time delivery.
 

Uzlu

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JMCanada said:
The fact is that we're talking about only one Polar icebreaker, but if we talked about two, it might be of interest to award one to Seaspan and the other to Davie.
It might be two.  If it is two, another possibility, if it is a modular design, is to ask Seaspan, Davie, and Heddle to each build a third of the modules with final assembly of one icebreaker at Seaspan and final assembly of one icebreaker at Davie.
 

MarkOttawa

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Odds on first CSC being launched in 2027?

Irving Shipbuilding one step closer to completing 3rd Arctic patrol ship​

...
"In November we are planning to launch the third ship and deliver it to the navy in 2022,"..

The first blocks of the fourth AOPS vessel, the future HMCS William Hall, are now being assembled and painted, the official keel laying will be coming soon. McCoy said the first steel on the fifth AOPS vessel is also not far away...

The ship builds started two years later than originally scheduled. Six Arctic patrol ships will be built as well as two more for the Canadian Coast Guard in the next few years...

Mark
Ottawa
 

Uzlu

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Seaspan Shipyards Wins Contract To Build Oceanographic Vessel For Canadian Coast Guard

Today, the Honourable Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement, and the Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced that the Government of Canada has awarded a contract of $453.8 million (taxes included) to Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards to enable the company to transition the offshore oceanographic science vessel (OOSV) project from the design phase to full construction.

Construction of the OOSV will begin in spring 2021, with delivery expected in 2024.

 

MarkOttawa

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Seaspan Shipyards Wins Contract To Build Oceanographic Vessel For Canadian Coast Guard

Today, the Honourable Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement, and the Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced that the Government of Canada has awarded a contract of $453.8 million (taxes included) to Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards to enable the company to transition the offshore oceanographic science vessel (OOSV) project from the design phase to full construction.

Construction of the OOSV will begin in spring 2021, with delivery expected in 2024.

Cost has tripled, insane--2016 story:

Budget for building oceanographic research ship inadequate, cabinet told​

...
The Canadian Press has learned that federal bureaucrats have warned the Liberals that the current $144 million budget for the offshore oceanographic science vessel is inadequate and will need to be topped up in order to complete the vessel...


And 2015-16 gov't report:

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Delivery of Offshore Oceanographic Science Vessel: 2017-18
...

Now 2024. Nuts.

Mark
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YZT580

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so why the delay issuing the build order? There was no competition issues to resolve so the whole thing must have been tied up in developing the blueprints which in turn implies that planning has been ricocheting back and forth between Seaspan and the coast guard trying to reconcile what was reasonable and what was a dream. Probably not the fault of Seaspan as they would be drafting what was asked for. I can't see hull or propulsion design ever being a drag but rather the little bits and pieces. Every science team afterall would want their dream lab. Goodness knows they have waited long enough to receive a purpose-built platform.
 

Uzlu

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Colin Parkinson

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Seaspan Shipyards Wins Contract To Build Oceanographic Vessel For Canadian Coast Guard

Today, the Honourable Anita Anand, Minister of Public Services and Procurement, and the Honourable Bernadette Jordan, Minister of Fisheries, Oceans and the Canadian Coast Guard, announced that the Government of Canada has awarded a contract of $453.8 million (taxes included) to Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards to enable the company to transition the offshore oceanographic science vessel (OOSV) project from the design phase to full construction.

Construction of the OOSV will begin in spring 2021, with delivery expected in 2024.

"Re-announcing" the art of repeating your promise just before an election.
 
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