Author Topic: Recent Warfare Technologies  (Read 254444 times)

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Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #400 on: September 23, 2017, 14:31:45 »
Shrinking a 105mm howitzer with its recoil system down to the point you can have a self propelled artillery piece mounted on a HMMVW or similar vehicle. the reduced crew is a nice touch as well. Something to consider if we want to continue to use 105mm howitzers for the Reserve Artillery park:

http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/weapons/a28288/hawkeye-humvee-mounted-howitzer/

Quote
This Humvee-Mounted Howitzer Is Here To "Shoot and Scoot"
The Hawkeye Mobile Weapon System can fire and then move at a moment's notice.
By Kyle Mizokami
Sep 20, 2017
1.3k
A new self-propelled howitzer system meets a Humvee—or a Ford F-250 pickup truck—with a 105-millimeter howitzer for an artillery system capable of rapidly moving from one firing position to another. The result is the Hawkeye,a new artillery system that can not only keep up with fast-moving friendly forces but dodge attempts by enemy forces to shut it down.

Howitzers are artillery pieces designed to engage targets out of sight. Like other so-called "indirect fire" systems such as mortars, howitzers fire a heavy projectile at targets miles away. A major problem with indirect fire weapons is that they generate a huge amount of recoil, making it necessary to mount them on heavy vehicles equipped with stabilizers that dig into the dirt, bracing the entire vehicle.

Mandus Group, a defense contractor that specializes in field artillery maintenance, figured out that the key to reducing howitzer weight was to reduce recoil. Once that was accomplished, a howitzer could be parked on top of much lighter vehicles. At 2,550 pounds, Mandus claims the Hawkeye is the world's lightest self-propelled howitzer.

The Hawkeye's hydraulic recoil-dampening system reduces recoil by seventy percent. This makes it possible for 105-millimeter howitzers, which used to be mounted in armored vehicles, to fit on a flatbed M1152A1 Humvee, a trailer, and even a Ford F-250 pickup. A single button retracts the hydraulic stabilizers, and the Hawkeye is ready to hit the road just thirty seconds later.

The ability to pack up everything and move quickly is not just useful to support friendly forces. Although artillery typically stays far behind friendly lines, howitzers like Hawkeye are routinely targeted in wartime by so-called "counterbattery" missions conducted by an adversary's own artillery. Counterbattery relies on sound-locating equipment or radar to detect the point of origin of incoming artillery rounds, which is then showered with indirect fire.

The key to staying in the fight and not getting blown up is what artillerymen call "shoot and scoot" —firing from one position, moving, and then firing from another. The faster an artillery unit can displace to its next firing position, the better its chances of survival.

Hawkeye can fire up to eight 105-millimeter rounds a minute for three minutes, meaning a battery of six vehicles can rain down 144 105-millimeter shells on the enemy before the gun barrel gets so hot it needs a rest. It can fire high explosive, illumination, and smoke rounds to a range of 7.2 miles. It can fire rocket assisted projectiles that sacrifice payload for a rocket motor that increases effective range to 12.2 miles.

Hawkeye could be very useful for U.S. Army light infantry brigades and Marines, and both services have reportedly shown interest. The Hawkeye is currently being exhibited at the Modern Day Marine trade show at Quantico, Virginia. It is scheduled to strut its stuff next week at Camp Atterbury, Indiana and later Fort Sill, Oklahoma, the home of the U.S. Army artillery branch.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Old Sweat

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #401 on: September 23, 2017, 15:40:15 »
With all due respect to the scientists and engineers who developed the howitzer, there are some questions I would like answered. One can pump that many rounds out of a conventional howitzer, (and I have seen it done) but can an average detachment lay it accurately and quickly enough to maintain the rate of fire? Second, and probably most important, what about the physics, specifically for every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction - that is the recoiling parts want to dissipate energy in the opposite direction. Are they using the firing out of battery technology the US Army developed in the sixties and seventies, but ultimately decided not to bring into service, or what?

Offline Colin P

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #402 on: October 11, 2017, 11:38:34 »
Looks a bit like an M102 Howitzer. I would design so can be jacked up, dismounted from the truck and then jacked down into place if used in static mode. Also useful that you could easily swap out the truck for another one.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #403 on: October 13, 2017, 10:27:38 »
From watching the video, it seems that the gun is going out of battery prior to firing, so the out of battery technology has either been revived or maybe independently recreated by these engineers.

The "can fire x rounds per minute" is mostly marketing hype. Yes a well drilled crew could fire that fast, but under what circumstances would that even make sense? They will either fire a few rounds then drive away (shoot and scoot) or bed in the truck and fire whenever called upon (much like a towed battery).

I can see this as a useful tool for a light unit, and if you want to make it more self contained, then attach a trailer carrying the ready ammunition. The major objection is a 105 is going to be outmatched in terms of range and weight of shot if the enemy is shooting back with 122, 152 or 155 artillery.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #404 on: October 21, 2017, 14:04:22 »
With the ever increasing number of electronic devices in use by soldiers and the military, this new technology for creating super capacitors should be quite useful.

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/10/paper-based-supercapacitor-will-get-boost-in-energy-density.html#more-138062

Quote
Paper-Based Supercapacitor Will Get Boost in Energy Density
brian wang | October 21, 2017 | 
 
Using a simple layer-by-layer coating technique, researchers from the U.S. and Korea have developed a paper-based flexible supercapacitor that could be used to help power wearable devices. The device uses metallic nanoparticles to coat cellulose fibers in the paper, creating supercapacitor electrodes with high energy and power densities – and the best performance so far in a textile-based supercapacitor.

By implanting conductive and charge storage materials in the paper, the technique creates large surface areas that function as current collectors and nanoparticle reservoirs for the electrodes. Testing shows that devices fabricated with the technique can be folded thousands of times without affecting conductivity.

“This type of flexible energy storage device could provide unique opportunities for connectivity among wearable and internet of things devices,” said Seung Woo Lee, an assistant professor in the Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. “We could support an evolution of the most advanced portable electronics. We also have an opportunity to combine this supercapacitor with energy-harvesting devices that could power biomedical sensors, consumer and military electronics, and similar applications.”

The research, done with collaborators at Korea University, was supported by the National Research Foundation of Korea and reported September 14 in the journal Nature Communications.

Energy storage devices are generally judged on three properties: their energy density, power density and cycling stability. Supercapacitors often have high power density, but low energy density – the amount of energy that can be stored – compared to batteries, which often have the opposite attributes. In developing their new technique, Lee and collaborator Jinhan Cho from the Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering at Korea University set out to boost energy density of the supercapacitors while maintaining their high power output.

They began by dipping paper samples into a beaker of solution containing an amine surfactant material designed to bind the gold nanoparticles to the paper. Next they dipped the paper into a solution containing gold nanoparticles. Because the fibers are porous, the surfactants and nanoparticles enter the fibers and become strongly attached, creating a conformal coating on each fiber.

By repeating the dipping steps, the researchers created a conductive paper on which they added alternating layers of metal oxide energy storage materials such as manganese oxide. The ligand-mediated layer-by-layer approach helped minimize the contact resistance between neighboring metal and/or metal oxide nanoparticles. Using the simple process done at room temperatures, the layers can be built up to provide the desired electrical properties.

“It’s basically a very simple process,” Lee said. “The layer-by-layer process, which we did in alternating beakers, provides a good conformal coating on the cellulose fibers. We can fold the resulting metallized paper and otherwise flex it without damage to the conductivity.”

Though the research involved small samples of paper, the solution-based technique could likely be scaled up using larger tanks or even a spray-on technique. “There should be no limitation on the size of the samples that we could produce,” Lee said. “We just need to establish the optimal layer thickness that provides good conductivity while minimizing the use of the nanoparticles to optimize the tradeoff between cost and performance.”

The researchers demonstrated that their self-assembly technique improves several aspects of the paper supercapacitor, including its areal performance, an important factor for measuring flexible energy-storage electrodes. The maximum power and energy density of the metallic paper-based supercapacitors are estimated to be 15.1 mW/cm2 and 267.3 uW/cm2, respectively, substantially outperforming conventional paper or textile supercapacitors.

The next steps will include testing the technique on flexible fabrics, and developing flexible batteries that could work with the supercapacitors. The researchers used gold nanoparticles because they are easy to work with, but plan to test less expensive metals such as silver and copper to reduce the cost.

CITATION: Yongmin Ko, Minseong Kwon, Wan Ki Bae, Byeongyong Lee, Seung Woo Lee & Jinhan Cho, “Flexible supercapacitor electrodes based on real metal-like cellulose papers,” (Nature Communications, 2017) http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/s41467-017-00550-3

Nature Communications – Flexible supercapacitor electrodes based on real metal-like cellulose papers

Abstract

The effective implantation of conductive and charge storage materials into flexible frames has been strongly demanded for the development of flexible supercapacitors. Here, we introduce metallic cellulose paper-based supercapacitor electrodes with excellent energy storage performance by minimizing the contact resistance between neighboring metal and/or metal oxide nanoparticles using an assembly approach, called ligand-mediated layer-by-layer assembly. This approach can convert the insulating paper to the highly porous metallic paper with large surface areas that can function as current collectors and nanoparticle reservoirs for supercapacitor electrodes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the alternating structure design of the metal and pseudocapacitive nanoparticles on the metallic papers can remarkably increase the areal capacitance and rate capability with a notable decrease in the internal resistance. The maximum power and energy density of the metallic paper-based supercapacitors are estimated to be 15.1 mW cm−2 and 267.3 μWh cm−2, respectively, substantially outperforming the performance of conventional paper or textile-type super capacitors.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #405 on: October 30, 2017, 14:12:56 »
The US Marines are looking for enhanced fire support in a small package. I have to wonder if there is anything which can meet the various demands being made (earlier posts looked at a low recoil 105mm which could be minted and fired from a HMMVW. Years ago the USMC had developed an automatic 120mm mortar which could be towed by a light vehicle or mounted on a LAV chassis as well, so there is a bit of a sense of reinventing the wheel here:

https://www.defensetech.org/2017/10/26/marines-want-truck-mounted-rocket-launcher-fits-osprey/

Quote
Marines Want a Truck-Mounted Rocket-Launcher that Fits in an Osprey
POSTED BY: HOPE HODGE SECK OCTOBER 26, 2017

ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The Marine Corps is on the hunt for an uber-compact rocket launcher system capable of raining down suppressive fire on the enemy, then flying away in a V-22 Osprey or CH-53K King Stallion.

As the Corps prepares for a future fight in which units operate with greater independence and at greater distances apart, portability and power are at a premium.

At the National Defense Industrial Association’s Expeditionary Warfare Conference, Marine Maj. Gen. David Coffman, director of expeditionary warfare for the Navy, said the service was after a system that could deliver both precision and suppressive effects.

“If we can get a self-contained vehicle that can fire rockets, a box of rockets on a truck that fits in the back of a tiltrotor or a ’53-K, that’s what we’re after,” he said.

Speaking to Military.com, Coffman expanded on his vision for such a system, saying he had in mind something potentially smaller than a Humvee.

“I don’t know what’s in the art of the possible, physics-wise, to get a vehicle that can withstand the recoil of rockets firing, and be a stable enough platform, and still be light enough to be lifted in a helicopter, and all that,” he said. “So I don’t know what industry can do, whether that’s possible or not … [but] that’s what we need.”

The Marine Corps currently deploys the Expeditionary Fire Support System, a 120mm mortar system designed to fit in a trailer pulled by a small all-terrain vehicle that fits inside an Osprey.

Next year, the system is due to receive a precision GPS-guided round that will extend its range from 8 kilometers to 16, or roughly 10 miles.

But Coffman said precision rounds are also being developed for the man-portable 81mm mortar system, minimizing the advantage of the EFSS.

“It kind of overcomes the need for the 120,” he said.

Ideally, Coffman said, the system he has in mind will have a range competitive with the M142 High Mobility Artillery Rocket System, or HIMARS, which is mounted on a 5-ton truck and has a range of 70 kilometers, or about 43 miles.

So far, all these requirements represent a wish list, but Coffman said he has had some promising conversations with industry professionals

“Let’s see what industry comes up with,” he said.

The Marine Corps, at the behest of Commandant Gen. Robert Neller, is working elsewhere to beef up its artillery capabilities and get more out of its existing systems.

In a first for the service, Marines on Monday fired a HIMARS rocket from the back of the amphibious transport dock USS Anchorage, proving the service’s ability to take out a land-based target from the sea at maximum effective range.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Old Sweat

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #406 on: October 30, 2017, 14:25:19 »
Excuse me for asking, but this paragraph got my attention:

“I don’t know what’s in the art of the possible, physics-wise, to get a vehicle that can withstand the recoil of rockets firing, and be a stable enough platform, and still be light enough to be lifted in a helicopter, and all that,” he said. “So I don’t know what industry can do, whether that’s possible or not … [but] that’s what we need.”

Rocket systems are recoilless, but the trade off is a large and potentially dangerous back blast area. Stability is another matter entirely.

Offline Colin P

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #407 on: October 30, 2017, 17:09:54 »
A light system that useful for the Reserves and operations is quite doable, either in the 120mm Mortar or 105mm Gun/Howitzer. The only thing lacking is will and without will, no money will be found. The secret is not to try to reinvent the wheel, but to pick a design that is fairly robust and simple. We got 50+ years out of the C1/C2/C3 family because it was simple and built to last. Lightweight for a gun/howitzer means shorter lifespan. Going by our procurement failures, you want a gun that will last at least 2 generations. If you want light, go Mortars. 

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #408 on: November 02, 2017, 20:52:16 »
Excuse me for asking, but this paragraph got my attention:

“I don’t know what’s in the art of the possible, physics-wise, to get a vehicle that can withstand the recoil of rockets firing, and be a stable enough platform, and still be light enough to be lifted in a helicopter, and all that,” he said. “So I don’t know what industry can do, whether that’s possible or not … [but] that’s what we need.”

Rocket systems are recoilless, but the trade off is a large and potentially dangerous back blast area. Stability is another matter entirely.

Sadly the standards of writing in virtually any technical subject are just awful these days. People with no training or background are expected to write technical articles, and it seems they are edited by equally inexperienced (to be nice) editors.

A light system that useful for the Reserves and operations is quite doable, either in the 120mm Mortar or 105mm Gun/Howitzer. The only thing lacking is will and without will, no money will be found. The secret is not to try to reinvent the wheel, but to pick a design that is fairly robust and simple. We got 50+ years out of the C1/C2/C3 family because it was simple and built to last. Lightweight for a gun/howitzer means shorter lifespan. Going by our procurement failures, you want a gun that will last at least 2 generations. If you want light, go Mortars. 

This was the point I was trying to get across (although probably badly worded). 120mm mortars with a range of 16km are probably a good fit for our reserve, and something like the Dragonfire II would be at least a 75% solution for what the USMC is asking for, with the biggest issue being their desired range. Even the light 105 mounted on a HMMVW showcased upthread would not have the desired range, unless there were either special shells (which would probably reduce the actual HE charge inside), or they used some variation of the hypervelocity shells designed for railguns and now being adapted to 155 and 5" naval cannons. This is projected to double the range of a 155, although there is no information about things like accuracy, terminal effects etc. I really can't say how this would scale in a 105, although I imagine this technology would simply eat barrels at a rapid rate.

Still, if the USMC can find a system which works for them, it is probably a good fit for the CF's artillery park as well. Lightweight, mobile, long range and hard hitting would be a great fit for a lot of different potential missions.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #409 on: November 02, 2017, 20:54:43 »
Excuse me for asking, but this paragraph got my attention:

“I don’t know what’s in the art of the possible, physics-wise, to get a vehicle that can withstand the recoil of rockets firing, and be a stable enough platform, and still be light enough to be lifted in a helicopter, and all that,” he said. “So I don’t know what industry can do, whether that’s possible or not … [but] that’s what we need.”

Rocket systems are recoilless, but the trade off is a large and potentially dangerous back blast area. Stability is another matter entirely.

Sadly the standards of writing in virtually any technical subject are just awful these days. People with no training or background are expected to write technical articles, and it seems they are edited by equally inexperienced (to be nice) editors.

A light system that useful for the Reserves and operations is quite doable, either in the 120mm Mortar or 105mm Gun/Howitzer. The only thing lacking is will and without will, no money will be found. The secret is not to try to reinvent the wheel, but to pick a design that is fairly robust and simple. We got 50+ years out of the C1/C2/C3 family because it was simple and built to last. Lightweight for a gun/howitzer means shorter lifespan. Going by our procurement failures, you want a gun that will last at least 2 generations. If you want light, go Mortars. 

This was the point I was trying to get across (although probably badly worded). 120mm mortars with a range of 16km are probably a good fit for our reserve, and something like the Dragonfire II would be at least a 75% solution for what the USMC is asking for, with the biggest issue being their desired range. Even the light 105 mounted on a HMMVW showcased upthread would not have the desired range, unless there were either special shells (which would probably reduce the actual HE charge inside), or they used some variation of the hypervelocity shells designed for railguns and now being adapted to 155 and 5" naval cannons. This is projected to double the range of a 155, although there is no information about things like accuracy, terminal effects etc. I really can't say how this would scale in a 105, although I imagine this technology would simply eat barrels at a rapid rate.

Still, if the USMC can find a system which works for them, it is probably a good fit for the CF's artillery park as well. Lightweight, mobile, long range and hard hitting would be a great fit for a lot of different potential missions.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #410 on: November 28, 2017, 12:12:32 »
So now there seems to be an optical means of delving through camouflage and "stealth". One can imagine this technology shrinking down and eventually sight units and NVG type helmet mounts might incorporate this technology (although how long that will take is to be seen, NV technology was introduced in WWII, and light amplification first appeared in the 1960's, how long after that did man portable and helmet mounted NVG's arrive? How long before they became available in quantity?)

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/11/us-and-china-racing-to-deploy-quantum-ghost-imaging-in-satellites-for-stealth-plane-tracking.html

Quote
US and China racing to deploy quantum ghost imaging in satellites for stealth plane tracking
brian wang | November 27, 2017 | 

China is developing a new type of spy satellite using ghost imaging technology which could spot stealth aircraft and see through smokescreens and camouflage.

Quantum ghost imaging can achieve unprecedented sensitivity by detecting not just the extremely small amount of light straying off a dim target, but also its interactions with other light in the surrounding environment to obtain more information than traditional methods.

The ghost imaging satellite would have two cameras, one aiming at the targeted area of interest with a bucket-like, single pixel sensor while the other camera measured variations in a wider field of light across the environment. By analyzing and merging the signals received by the two cameras with a set of sophisticated algorithms in quantum physics, scientists could conjure up the imaging of an object with extremely high definition previously thought impossible using conventional methods. The ghost camera could also identify the physical nature or even chemical composition of a target, according to Gong. This meant the military would be able to distinguish decoys such as fake fighter jets on display in an airfield or missile launchers hidden under a camouflage canopy.

Tang Lingli, a researcher with the Academy of Opto-Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing, said numerous new devices had been built, tested in the field and were ready for deployment on ground-based radar stations, planes and airships.

Gong Wenlin, research director at the Key Laboratory for Quantum Optics, Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai – whose team is building the prototype ghost imaging device for satellite missions – said their technology was designed to catch “invisibles” like the B-2s.

He said his lab, led by prominent quantum optics physicist Han Shensheng, would complete a prototype by 2020 with an aim to test the technology in space before 2025. By 2030 he said there would be some large-scale applications.

While ghost imaging has already been tested on ground-based systems, Gong’s lab is in a race with overseas competitors, including the US Army Research Laboratory, to launch the world’s first ghost imaging satellite.

The chinese team showed the engineering feasibility of the technology with a ground experiment in 2011. Three years later the US army lab announced similar results.

Recently, it was shown that the principles of ‘Compressed-Sensing’ can be directly utilized to reduce the number of measurements required for image reconstruction in ghost imaging. This technique allows an N pixel image to be produced with far less than N measurements and may have applications in LIDAR and microscopy.

Remote sensing

Ghost imaging is being considered for application in remote-sensing systems as a possible competitor with imaging laser radars (LADAR). A theoretical performance comparison between a pulsed, computational ghost imager and a pulsed, floodlight-illumination imaging laser radar identified scenarios in which a reflective ghost-imaging system has advantages.

X-ray ghost imaging

A ghost-imaging experiment for hard x-rays was recently achieved using data obtained at the European Synchrotron. Here, speckled pulses of x-rays from individual electron synchrotron bunches were used to generate a ghost-image basis, enabling proof-of-concept for experimental x-ray ghost imaging. At the same time that this experiment was reported, a Fourier-space variant of x-ray ghost imaging was published.

NASA also worked on Ghost imaging and found the beam splitter was not needed

A different approach allows us to dispense with such a beam splitter, transferring its function to the object itself. This is an advanced version of the famous Hanbury Brown Twiss intensity interferometer.

Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #411 on: December 15, 2017, 11:13:35 »
Using robots for what is essentially crowd control is another preview of the use of robots in the field:

http://www.businessinsider.com/security-robots-are-monitoring-the-homeless-in-san-francisco-2017-12?utm_content=buffer9d547&utm_medium=social&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_campaign=buffer-bi

Quote
Robots are being used to deter homeless people from setting up camp in San Francisco
Melia Robinson
Dec. 12, 2017, 1:51 PM    81,609

A security robot has been put to work in San Francisco in an attempt to deter homeless people from forming tent cities.

The robot uses lasers and sensors to monitor an area for criminal activity. Rather than intervene during a crime, it alerts human authorities.
The robot's owner, the San Francisco SPCA, said it has seen fewer tents and car break-ins since it deployed the robot in the city's Mission neighborhood.
 
In San Francisco, autonomous crime-fighting robots that are used to patrol parking lots, sports arenas, and tech company campuses are now being deployed to keep away homeless people.

The San Francisco Business Times reported last week that the San Francisco SPCA, an animal advocacy and pet adoption group, put a security robot to work outside its facilities in the gentrifying Mission neighborhood. The robot's presence is meant to deter homeless people from setting up camps along the sidewalks.

Last week, the City of San Francisco ordered the SF SPCA to keep its robot off the streets or be fined up to $1,000 per day for operating on sidewalks without a permit, according to the Business Times.

Krista Maloney, media relations manager for the SF SPCA, told Business Insider that staff wasn't able to safely use the sidewalks at times because of the encampments. Maloney added that since the SPCA started guarding its facilities with the robot — known as K9 — a month ago, the homeless encampments have dwindled and there have been fewer car break-ins.

Here it is in action pic.twitter.com/nSBQUmKwk1

— Sam Dodge (@samueldodge) December 9, 2017
K9 is part of a crime-fighting robot fleet manufactured and managed by startup Knightscope in Mountain View, California. The company's robots don't fight humans; they use equipment like lasers, cameras, a thermal sensor, and GPS to detect criminal activity and alert the authorities.

Their intent is to give human security guards "superhuman" eyes and ears, according to Bill Santana Li, CEO of Knightscope, who spoke with Business Insider earlier this year.

Knightscope rents out the robots for $7 an hour — less than a security guard's hourly wage. The company has over 19 clients in five US states. Most customers, including Microsoft, Uber, and Juniper Networks, put the robots to work patrolling parking lots and office buildings.

Preventing crime is part of the pitch that Knightscope makes to prospective customers. (Increased police presence can reduce crime, though this is not always the case.)

"If I put a marked law enforcement vehicle in front of your home or your office, criminal behavior changes," Li told Business Insider earlier this year.

The K9 robot circling the SF SPCA has drawn mixed responses. Within the first week of the robot's deployment, some people who were setting up a homeless encampment nearby allegedly "put a tarp over it, knocked it over, and put barbecue sauce on all the sensors," according to Jennifer Scarlett, president of the SF SPCA. A Twitter user reported seeing feces smeared on the robot.

Some people took to Twitter to express their disappointment in the group.

It's disheartening that @sfspca would show such a lack of compassion to our houseless neighbors. https://t.co/mN8wLprKOP

— NLCHP (@NLCHPhomeless) December 11, 2017
https://t.co/rz1AaosRo3 so @sfspca is using a security robot to “deal with” #homeless people in encampments near its mission campus? An org that helps homeless animals can’t think of a better way to respond to its homeless human neighbors?

— Red Riv (@RedRivecca) December 9, 2017
Others commended the robot for cleaning up their streets.

Leave it to #SanFrancisco to rebuke security robot that deterred encampments from taking over sidewalks & reduced discarded needles & crime near non-profit. https://t.co/ilqbKeIa4F via @svbizjournal #SFInsanity

— ShanePatrickConnolly (@shanepc1) December 11, 2017
A spokesperson for Knightscope declined to comment.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #412 on: December 15, 2017, 11:39:33 »
Good Lord! The way that thing looks, when it gets near you, you almost expect it to start chanting:

"E-X-T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-E  ... E-X-T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-E  ... E-X-T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-E"  ;D
« Last Edit: December 15, 2017, 12:45:23 by Oldgateboatdriver »

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #413 on: December 16, 2017, 09:20:33 »
Good Lord! The way that thing looks, when it gets near you, you almost expect it to start chanting:

"E-X-T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-E  ... E-X-T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-E  ... E-X-T-E-R-M-I-N-A-T-E"  ;D

I think you have to wait for the 2018 model with the death ray first.....
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #414 on: December 18, 2017, 00:48:13 »
The perennial issue of bandwidth may have a workaround. While baloons may have to be switched out for UAV's, the demonstration of using lasers to send large amounts of data through free space is interesting:

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2017/12/india-will-deploy-two-thousand-google-laser-internet-links-for-highspeed-network-backbone.html

Quote
India will deploy two thousand Google laser internet links for highspeed network backbone

To make Project Loon a reality, Google had to figure out how to send data reliably between balloons flying on the stratospheric winds. One solution, first proved out by sending a copy of the film Real Genius across more than 100 kilometers between balloons, was Free Space Optical Communications, aka FSOC, technology. After seeing these results in the stratosphere we wondered if it would be possible to apply some of that science closer to earth to help us solve other connectivity challenges.

FSOC links use beams of light to deliver high-speed, high-capacity connectivity over long distances — just like fiber optic cable, but without the cable. And because there’s no cable, this means there’s none of the time, cost, and hassle involved in digging trenches or stringing cable along poles. FSOC boxes can simply be placed kilometers apart on roofs or towers, with the signal beamed directly between the boxes to easily traverse common obstacles like rivers, roads and railways.

For the last few months, a small group from Google — some of us from the Loon team and some of us who’ve worked on various connectivity-related technologies over the years — have been piloting a new approach with FSOC links. They have been working with AP State FiberNet, a telecom company in Andhra Pradesh, a state in India which is home to more than 53 million people. Less than 20% of residents currently have access to broadband connectivity, so the state government has committed to connecting 12 million households and thousands of government organizations and businesses by 2019 — an initiative called AP Fiber Grid.

Today AP State FiberNet announced that they’ll be rolling out two thousand FSOC links created by our team at X. These FSOC links will form part of the high-bandwidth backbone of their network, giving them a cost effective way to connect rural and remote areas across the state. The links will plug critical gaps to major access points, like cell-towers and WiFi hotspots, that support thousands of people.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Rifleman62

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #415 on: January 19, 2018, 16:52:21 »
http://www.foxnews.com/tech/2018/01/19/us-military-teams-up-with-silicon-valley-to-revolutionize-battlefield.html  (video at link)

US military teams up with Silicon Valley to revolutionize the battlefield
- Lea Gabrielle, Georeen Tanner - Fox News - 19 Jan 18

The U.S. military is partnering with Silicon Valley to step up its game on the battlefield.

The Defense Innovation Unit Experimental (DIUX), which is part of the Department of Defense, is connecting the U.S. military with companies developing leading-edge technology that would help it carry out missions quicker and cheaper.

"It's all about decision making faster than the enemy,” Lt. Gen. Jeffrey Harrigian told Fox News.

As the commander of the air war in Iraq, Syria, and Afghanistan, Harrigian knows that on today’s complex battlefields, winning often comes down to timing and efficiency.

“We can't do what we need to do every day without software that's the leading edge,” he said.

Harrigian said it was time the military worked with an industry that could bring it to the forefront of technology – and bring greater efficiency on the battlefield.

“[Silicon Valley is] getting out in front of the world to develop software that is now integral to war fighting,” he said. “If you can imagine, there's a target out there that we see, that we want to get after quickly and put ordnance on it."

Private industry is on the same page.

Keith Salisbury represents Pivotal Software, one of the companies trying to help the military work smarter and faster.

“The war fighter needs a decision: ‘Do I engage or not?’” Salisbury said. “The process in general is a bunch of chat windows open on a computer screen—about 20 or more—and then a bunch of people start looking into systems to find out, ‘Where is that target? What are the surrounding facilities? Are there schools? Are there hospitals? Are there civilian populations? What munition would be appropriate? Do we engage or not?"

As part of a Defense Innovation Advisory Board, leaders from technology companies like Pivotal Software went to the Combined Air Operations Center (CAOC) at Al Udeid Air Base in Qatar to see how they could help.

What they encountered was startling.

"They saw lots of whiteboards,” Salisbury said. “They saw lots of Excel spreadsheets, lots of different systems, lots in writing, lots of erasing and a very manually intensive process."

Even planning where and when to have refueling tankers was cumbersome and dated, he said.

“It's about 60 air refueling tankers and then you tag onto that another 150 to 200 fighters that are out there every day and we're war fighting so you can't have a fighter show up and not have a tanker there,” said Harrigian. “It would literally take us 8 to 10 hours to do that every day."

The solution? Make an app for that.

Experts were able to do that by putting software experts next to airmen.

"We paired with them and we taught them this new way of building software and we built the software application side by side with them,” Salisbury said.

The Air Force says it takes half the manpower half the time and saves nearly a million dollars of fuel per week.

They have also developed a program to quickly answer that warfighter question: “To engage or not to engage?”

“Think about using Microsoft Word, Excel, Google Earth and then a tool that manages all our targets for us,” said Harrigian. “So all those are now combined into one tool that allows then the decision maker to see all the information at once and then we can immediately get after the target. It allows us to stay in front of the enemy.”

Fox News Correspondent Lea Gabrielle is a former Navy F/A-18C pilot who flew missions in Afghanistan from the deck of the USS George Washington for Operation Enduring Freedom.
Never Congratulate Yourself In Victory, Nor Blame Your Horses In Defeat - Old Cossack Expression

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #416 on: January 25, 2018, 14:50:50 »
Another UV for naval use. This one is a sailing vessel which plies the surface waters, but in conjunction with "wavegliders" and "Seagliders" a fairly robust "picquet line" of sensors could be deployed, either relaying information to deployed ships of a task force or directly to shore based command posts.

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2018/01/141674.html

Quote
CSIRO partners with Saildrone for ocean monitoring
brian wang | January 25, 2018   

CSIRO has announced a partnership with San Francisco-based ocean technology start-up, Saildrone, to radically improve measurement and monitoring in Australian waters and the Southern Ocean.

The research partnership over five years between Saildrone and CSIRO’s Oceans and Atmosphere group will see the deployment of state-of-the-art unmanned ocean surface vehicles, Saildrones, for the first time in Australian waters.

Research with the Saildrones will expand CSIRO’s extensive network of marine and climate monitoring systems around Australia, collecting more information about sea-surface temperature, salinity, and ocean carbon, and providing a platform for continued development of the next generation of marine and climate technologies.

The Saildrones are solar and wind powered and can be at sea for up to 12 months at a time where they can be tasked to assist in science missions including conducting stock assessments, uploading data from subsurface sensors or responding to marine emergencies.

They can be controlled remotely from anywhere in the world and are equipped with both automatic identification systems (AIS) and ship avoidance systems to alert and avoid other ocean users.

CSIRO Research Group Leader Andreas Marouchos said the partnership would see the organisation manage a fleet of three Saildrones deployed from the CSIRO in Hobart.

“This research partnership comes at a critical time for the marine environment, and at a time when technological innovation in the marine sector is booming,” Mr Marouchos said.

“Saildrones are long-range research platforms that can be sent to remote locations for an extended period of time, delivering real-time data back to scientists that was previously impossible to collect.”

“The devices gather fundamental information about our oceans and climate using a powerhouse of ocean chemistry, meteorological and marine acoustic sensors.

Ship time is expensive and yet ocean research depends on it. By augmenting traditional ships with a fleet of Saildrones, you can cost-effectively and autonomously gather data over large ocean areas in any conditions. Launched and retrieved from a dock, the Saildrone fleet navigates to its destination using wind power alone, transiting at 3-5 kts. Each drone can then hold station or perform survey patterns best suited for the specific research mission
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #417 on: January 28, 2018, 18:37:13 »
An introduction to "Blockchains". This is the underlying technology behind "bitcoins" and other cryptocurrency, but it has many other uses as well. For ourselves, this could be used to make things like supply chain management, pay and allowances and other administrative tasks quicker, easier and ultimately cheaper as much of the checking functions of the admin and supply chain are automated, allowing much of the work to be done by fewer clerks and support staff.

https://csrc.nist.gov/CSRC/media/Publications/nistir/8202/draft/documents/nistir8202-draft.pdf

59 page document, but well worth reading to understand how this works.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Colin P

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #418 on: February 07, 2018, 11:33:27 »
and we can call it Phoenix II.....

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #419 on: February 25, 2018, 03:41:12 »
and we can call it Phoenix II.....

Rising from the ashes....
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

Offline Spencer100

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #420 on: February 28, 2018, 16:16:18 »
US army third arm via the Colonial Marines! 


http://www.businessinsider.com/army-mechanical-third-arm-2018-2




Offline GR66

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #421 on: June 24, 2018, 10:41:03 »
From the Science Daily website...

"Infrared cameras are the heat-sensing eyes that help drones find their targets even in the dead of night or through heavy fog. Hiding from such detectors could become much easier, thanks to a new cloaking material that renders objects -- and people -- practically invisible."

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/06/180622174752.htm

This is a thin (< 1mm) sheet that they are claiming can absorb almost 94% of IR light it encounters.  By using electronic heating elements it can also be used to mimic other objects.  The example they use is making a tank look like a highway guardrail to an IR sensor.

I imagine one hitch would be that you still can't mask the hot exhaust plumes from a running engine, but it could be very useful for AT missile teams waiting to ambush an advancing armoured column for example.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: Recent Warfare Technologies
« Reply #422 on: July 02, 2018, 16:27:16 »
The American military is replacing the Hellfire with an upgraded missile capable of using both laser and millimetric radar, as well as engaging moving targets. Reading the article I get the idea this is actually just an upgrade of the existing Hellfire, but with a new seeker (everything else seems to be the same). The idea of a "universal" tactical missile for aircraft, ships and ground platforms is good, and perhaps a program we should be buying into, to get our own ATGM house in order.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/weapons/a21969023/hellfire-tank-killer-replacement-enters-production/

Quote
Hellfire Tank Killer Replacement Enters Production
The Joint Air Ground Missile will launch from helicopters, smash tanks, boats, virtually anything worth smashing.
By Kyle Mizokami
Jun 27, 2018

The U.S. military’s replacement for the Hellfire anti-tank missile has entered production, capping off years of development. The Joint Air Ground Missile (JAGM) will arm U.S. Army and Marine Corps attack helicopters, providing a weapon capable of destroying the heaviest tanks from miles away.

The JAGM replaces the AGM-114 Hellfire missile. First fielded in the early 1980s, Hellfire was designed as a heavy tank-killer to destroy Soviet tanks on the Western European battlefield. Just over five feet long, seven inches wide and weighing approximately 100 pounds, Hellfire could kill tanks at ranges of up to five miles. U.S. Army AH-64 Apache attack helicopters carry up to sixteen of the missiles at a time. U.S. Marine Cobra attack helicopters also use the Hellfire to attack armored and ground targets, while U.S. Navy MH-60R “Romeo” helicopters carry the Hellfire to attack enemy ships.

The original Hellfire missile was guided to target by a laser designator, either on the helicopter or on the ground. A later version, AGM-114L, was sent to its target by a helicopter-mounted millimetric wave radar. Hellfire was used in both the 1991 Gulf War, 2003 invasion of Iraq, and the war in Afghanistan, often against non-armored targets such as groups of fighters with rifles or munitions bunkers. As a result the services developed new Hellfires with warheads better suited to destroying softer, but still dangerous targets.

JAGM combines both target designation systems into a single missile. An attack helicopter with JAGMs could launch a missile using its laser designator and then allow the missile’s millimetric wave sensor to guide itself to target the rest of the way, giving it a “fire and forget” capability. This increases the survivability of the helicopter, which might give itself away by firing and need to take evasive action.

JAGM in many respects is the same Hellfire missile, with the same warhead, motor, and flight control systems as the latest version of the Hellfire, AGM-114R. The warhead, as the U.S. Navy puts it, “provides lethal effects against a range of target types, from armored vehicles, thin-skinned vehicles and maritime patrol craft to urban structures and field fortifications.” It also has a programmable, delayed detonation warhead to allow it to penetrate bunkers or similar targets and then explode inside, instead of exploding outside. JAGM can, as Defense News states, engage targets in bad weather or obscured (think smoke) conditions. JAGM’s range is probably identical to the Hellfire—as a tactical battlefield missile, there isn’t much point in a missile that can strike at more than five miles.

The Pentagon hasn’t said much about JAGM’s new capabilties but one new capability it has that Hellfire lacks is the ability to hit moving targets. Hellfires can hit moving targets but the weapons operator must keep the laser trained on the target until missile impact, something that apparently has just a 35 percent success rate. A moving target capability will also be useful to the Navy, which is concerned about fast-moving swarms of armed speedboats overwhelming the defenses of larger ships. The Navy is staying out of the program for now but future interest is a virtual certainty.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.