Author Topic: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy  (Read 900447 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Hamish Seggie

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 237,232
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 10,668
  • This is my son Michael, KIA Afghanistan 3 Sep 08
Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3000 on: March 10, 2020, 14:36:17 »
I find it notable that the one ship not built by the yard visible is the one ship that's actually sailing...and is capable of sailing around a continent.

As for the Halifax Class - there was a LOT of steel returned by the RCN post MLR that ISI ran out of time/money to install on the hulls.  That was steel which was surveyed as requiring replacement before the ships went into the MLR...and wasn't done...so how much worse has it gotten since then? 

The MLR was not a re-fit, it was a combat-systems reconfiguration.  The MAR ENG world either had or let their major 'big ticket' items get pushed out of the MLR - DG replacement, Chiller replacements, etc.   Can't blame them.

Something rotten in the state of Denmark perhaps?
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 80,705
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,929
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3001 on: March 10, 2020, 15:54:31 »
Yes, they are but the refit focused almost exclusively on updating the combat suite. The hull and marine systems were not updated.  Freddy's recent docking work period replaced almost 20m of steel amidships due to rust out and metal fatigue...

CP story:

Quote
Navy’s aging warships getting harder to repair: Defence report

The Royal Canadian Navy’s maintenance facilities are having an increasingly tougher time fixing Canada’s warships because of staff shortages, lack of spare parts and the age of the fleet, according to an internal Defence Department study.

The navy was also found to be critically short of sonar and sensor operators for its frigates while ongoing challenges in getting Canada’s submarines into the water are hurting the navy’s ability to train new submariners to crew them.

The study’s findings were written last year but only published by the Defence Department this week. The Canadian Press recently reported on navy and Canadian Coast Guard needing hundreds more sailors between them to get up to strength.

The study found the navy was able to conduct nearly all of its overseas missions despite the challenges, in part by moving people and equipment around to where they were needed most. The exception was Canada’s trouble-plagued submarines.

Navy officials also told those conducting the study that they were working on plans to address the underlying problems, including putting more money and staff into the fleet maintenance facilities in Victoria and Halifax.

The findings nonetheless reiterate the importance of addressing those personnel shortfalls both in terms of sailors and maintenance staff while underscoring the importance of preventing any further delays in the long-running effort to replace Canada’s warship fleets.

The difficulties facing the maintenance facilities figured prominently in the study findings, which said the facilities “have been increasingly challenged to sustain the aging platforms and increasingly obsolete systems of the Halifax-class frigates and Victoria-class submarines.”

The challenges were even found to extend to some systems only recently installed aboard the 1980s-era frigates as part of a major upgrade that is intended to keep them operating until new warships arrive, which is currently expected to happen in the late 2020s and early in the next decade.

In the meantime, “the obsolescence of certain parts and systems, including some recently installed (Halifax-class modernization) systems, and the growing age of the platforms themselves, remain significant issues,” the study found.

The maintenance facilities were also found to have lost about 10 per cent of their staff over the past few years even as the demand for repairs steadily increased. The study did not say why staff were leaving.

Complicating matters was availability of spare parts, again part due to the age of the ships. In some cases, parts had to be taken from one ship or submarine that was docked in extended maintenance periods and put in another needing less work to get it out the door faster...
https://www.mromagazine.com/2020/03/09/navys-aging-warships-getting-harder-to-repair-defence-report/

Mark
Ottawa
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline MarkOttawa

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 80,705
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6,929
  • Two birthdays
    • The 3Ds Blog
Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3002 on: March 27, 2020, 14:07:03 »
While RCN and CCG wait and wait and wait for their fleets of new vessels, Aussies are now building first of 12 OPVs, based on PV80 design of Germany's Lürssen (https://www.luerssen-defence.com/opv-80/):

Quote
Australia officialy starts construction of first Arafura class Offshore Patrol Vessel

The Government’s $90 billion Continuous Naval Shipbuilding Program has reached a new milestone with construction on the first Offshore Patrol Vessel (OPV) to be built in Western Australia commencing.

This will be the third of twelve Arafura class OPVs, and the first to be built at the Civmec shipyard in Henderson, Western Australia. The twelve Australian vessels are based on the PV80 design with the first two vessels to be built at ASC's Osborne shipyard in South Australia before production moves to Civmec's Henderson shipyard in Western Australia.

The program will replace and improve upon the capability delivered by the Armidale Class and Cape Class Patrol Boats which entered service in 2005.

The Arafura class offshore patrol vessels (OPV) are being built for the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). The new OPVs are intended to replace the existing Armidale class and Cape class patrol boats, Huon class coastal minehunters, and Leeuwin class survey ships in service with the RAN.

The OPVs in the class will be able to perform maritime patrol, response duties, and constabulary missions. The vessels can be customized to perform mine hunting, hydrographic survey, fisheries patrol, disaster relief, and unmanned aerial system (UAS) missions [emphasis added].

The new OPVs will be 80 meters in length with a displacement of 1700 tonnes [like many WW II destroyers] and a draught of 4 meters. They will be fitted with a 40 mm gun for self-protection, three 8.4 m sea boats, state of the art sensors as well as command and communication systems [top speed 22 knots].

The vessels are able to embark unmanned aerial (UAV), underwater (UUV) and surface vehicles (USV) and can operate larger sea boats which are essential for boarding operations.

The first two vessels are already under construction by Luerssen Australia and ASC in Adelaide [emphasis added].

The remaining ten vessels will be constructed by Luerssen Australia and Civmec at Henderson in Western Australia under the SEA1180 OPV program.


https://www.navyrecognition.com/index.php/news/defence-news/2020/march/8213-australia-officialy-starts-construction-of-first-arafura-class-offshore-patrol-vessel.html

Mark
Ottawa

« Last Edit: March 27, 2020, 17:15:10 by MarkOttawa »
Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Online Chris Pook

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 211,985
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 12,891
  • Wha daur say Mass in ma lug!
Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3003 on: March 27, 2020, 18:37:46 »


The Aussie's are a nation of chancers.  There is no Canadian equivalent of Two-Up.

Canadians want to know the outcome of the game before they'll place a bet.

The Aussie's are more willing to lose a dollar so they can move when there is a greater level of uncertainty and deliver projects faster.







"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

"If change isn’t allowed to be a process, it becomes an event." - Penny Mordaunt 10/10/2019

Offline MTShaw

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Jr. Member
  • *
  • 3,580
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 59
  • Dont believe everything you say.
Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3004 on: March 27, 2020, 18:42:24 »
While RCN and CCG wait and wait and wait for their fleets of new vessels, Aussies are now building first of 12 OPVs, based on PV80 design of Germany's Lürssen (https://www.luerssen-defence.com/opv-80/):

Mark
Ottawa

Thank you for bad mouthing all of the builders at Irving and Seaspan who, in your opinion, are not working fast enough.

Get a grip, Mark.

HMG of both parties have bungled the start of the shipbuilding process. However, that process is underway, and I will reserve judgement until we are well in to it.

Michael

Offline Colin P

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 157,185
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 10,002
  • Civilian
    • http://www.pacific.ccg-gcc.gc.ca
Re: New Canadian Shipbuilding Strategy
« Reply #3005 on: March 27, 2020, 18:56:08 »
Warts and all I am in favour of the NSPS, I just wished they started 20 years earlier. Regardless of party, I don't see how they could not involve Irving.