Author Topic: Family Care Plan (FCP) [Merged]  (Read 107706 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Greymatters

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 15,700
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,573
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #50 on: November 14, 2007, 22:13:54 »
6 months for civvie land, 1 year for us

Does anyone know why it is 1 year then? 

I might have missed this as well, but does time away on tour still count towards co-habitation according to CF regs?  Im also interested in learning if this is being applied to reserve personnel who accept six month deployments - if they are away for a six month period, does that time count towards co-habitation, enabling new spousal benefits partway or after a tour?  I might have to address this with our company's HR department policies when discussing employee and spousal benefits.

Offline airmich

  • Mentor
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 402,202
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,161
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #51 on: November 15, 2007, 07:01:51 »
Does anyone know why it is 1 year then? 

I might have missed this as well, but does time away on tour still count towards co-habitation according to CF regs?  Im also interested in learning if this is being applied to reserve personnel who accept six month deployments - if they are away for a six month period, does that time count towards co-habitation, enabling new spousal benefits partway or after a tour?  I might have to address this with our company's HR department policies when discussing employee and spousal benefits.

Check out this thread for more references on Common Law.

Ref:  CFAO 19-41 para 5
Quote
5.     The continuous period of at least one year referred to in subparagraph
(2)(c) of  QR&O 1.075 may include periods of involuntary separation for
such reasons as temporary duty, attached posting or unaccompanied posting
(eg, a six-month UN tour). However, the couple must have resided together
as husband and wife during the remainder of the one-year period .
So I'll raise a glass, not the first nor last, Come join me in this toast...Because the old black rum's got a hold on me ~ Great Big Sea

Offline Fusilier

  • Member
  • ****
  • 380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 100
  • Defence not Defiance
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #52 on: November 15, 2007, 10:36:43 »
Roy, yup that was me (1 VP 1996-2007).  I sent it out to all the Bde units to make use of if they wished.  Thanks for the comments!

Offline Roy Harding

    He\'s Back.

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 14,965
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,234
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #53 on: November 15, 2007, 10:54:14 »
Roy, yup that was me (1 VP 1996-2007).  I sent it out to all the Bde units to make use of if they wished.  Thanks for the comments!

You're welcome - forward them to your boss for PER points!!
I love mankind.  It's people I can't stand.

Linus van Pelt

Offline Fusilier

  • Member
  • ****
  • 380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 100
  • Defence not Defiance
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #54 on: November 15, 2007, 14:15:00 »
Ha ha, don't know if it would get me anywhere.  Besides, didn't do it for points but to "enlighten" and educate my Pl Comds, the original draft was put out in 1999.  I did submit it to the Bde as something that may be more useful if it was an official booklet (like the Pregnancy and the CF booklet) but nothing came of it.  Maybe I'll try again ;)

Offline Greymatters

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 15,700
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,573
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #55 on: November 15, 2007, 15:33:24 »
Check out this thread for more references on Common Law.

Ref:  CFAO 19-41 para 5

Excellent, thanks for the assist.

Offline 3VP Highlander

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 956,720
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 94
  • 39+ years service to date and still enjoying it !!
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #56 on: November 15, 2007, 16:21:04 »
Fusilier

Thanks for the updated info.  It will be very handy for a lot of our new soldiers.

Offline CHIEF MILITARY PERSONNEL

  • Guest
  • *
  • 0
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #57 on: June 28, 2008, 18:08:28 »
If forms are not up to date, nothing can be done; the policy is clear given the huge sums of monies that can be involved in some cases - what is on any form, regardless of the date on the form, is taken as the "last wishes and the direction" of our men and women in uniform.  The leadership must remind, on a regular basis, the men and women under its command to keep these forms up to date. Aside from the PEN form, another good example of a forum that needs to be kept up to date is the Memorial Cross form.   

Ws

MOD EDIT: took the blue out so it could be read.
Bruce
« Last Edit: June 28, 2008, 18:10:28 by Bruce Monkhouse »

Offline Fusilier

  • Member
  • ****
  • 380
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 100
  • Defence not Defiance
Re: THE MILITARY AND YOUR FAMILY RESPONSIBILITIES - UPDATED FOR 2007
« Reply #58 on: July 02, 2008, 12:41:46 »
CMP,

Are you making a comment on content?  Ie; something that must be updated, if so please specify where in the document so that I may amend it.

Understood, we must accept the forms as they are, however members must also accept responsibility for themselves and be an active participant in their own administration.  As administrators all we can do is remind, nag etc both the chain of command and members to ensure their info is kept up to date.  Document review must be done a minimum of once a year, orderly rooms must ensure that their change of marital status checklists (as per A-PM-245) is updated to include new forms etc as they are introduced.  A standardized method of filing particular forms must be followed (ie; PA'd to the left side of the UPF for forms that require regular review).  There are many things that can be done and should be done however in the growing piles of administration the importance of these documents sometimes seem to be lost, that is from my experience in receiving files.

Offline Technoviking

    DANCE TO THE TECHNOVIKING.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 182,771
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,870
  • OBEY!
Re: Child Care
« Reply #59 on: June 27, 2009, 09:42:56 »
BUMP AGAIN
Hi all, I tried the MFRC and no luck.  I'm looking for someplace (Oromocto) where I can drop off the kids around 7 am and pick them up around 5 pm, though some days sooner.  They are two girls: 12 and 8 (turning 9 in July).  They are low maintenance; however, just a wee too young to be home alone all day long. 

Hints?  Anyone know anyone?

Thanks in advance.
So, there I was....

Offline Celticgirl

  • Sr. Member
  • *****
  • 12,730
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 950
  • 413 Sqn OR Clk
Re: Child Care
« Reply #60 on: June 30, 2009, 09:08:40 »
BUMP AGAIN
Hi all, I tried the MFRC and no luck.  I'm looking for someplace (Oromocto) where I can drop off the kids around 7 am and pick them up around 5 pm, though some days sooner.  They are two girls: 12 and 8 (turning 9 in July).  They are low maintenance; however, just a wee too young to be home alone all day long. 

Hints?  Anyone know anyone?

Thanks in advance.

The Oromocto MFRC has a binder full of names of local childcare providers, their contact info, and what they charge per day. I just found summer childcare for my daughter this way. Good luck! :)
You can't separate peace from freedom because no one can be at peace unless he has his freedom. ~ Malcolm X

Offline IntelGirl

  • Guest
  • *
  • 355
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14
The Only Stressful Part Of Joining Up...
« Reply #61 on: July 08, 2009, 09:22:06 »
Hello everyone,

I have finally made the decision to join the CF in about 1.5 years. Why so long from now? Because I am a single mother...and to be honest planning your child's care isn' easy. My mother has graciously volunteered to take my daughter for my BMQ training, but I am left wondering...what happens after that?

I talked to a local recruiter and he said after training was finished, he sees no reason why she couldn't live on base with me, however I don't know how that would work! I guess it's the only part I am really concerned about...

I'm wondering how many single parents without the full support of the other parent have joined and how they managed?


Offline ArmyVern

    is awake.

  • Army.ca Myth
  • *****
  • 207,746
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 15,536
Hard by MCpl Elton Adams

If you or someone you love is having difficulty & would like to speak to someone who has been through a similar experience, who understands, & will respect your need for privacy and confidentiality, contact OSISS toll-free at 1-800-883-6094. You can locate the peer closest to you by logging on to www.osiss.ca, clicking on “Contact us” link & then choosing the “Peer” or “Family Support Network”. Help IS out there.

Offline PMedMoe

    is retired and loving it!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 249,635
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 10,254
Re: The Only Stressful Part Of Joining Up...
« Reply #63 on: July 08, 2009, 10:04:26 »
How do single parents do anything without the support of another parent?  The military is not that different from any other job with the exception of possibly being away more.  I just hope you're not applying for a trade that has a tendency to be away a lot (e.g. Navy on ships).

When you get posted to a base you will be able to live in PMQs, rent on the civvy side or even buy a house, so there is no reason your daughter cannot live with you.  Just ensure you have a good family care plan set up.  Check the links that Army Vern provided, I'm sure there's lots of info in them.
« Last Edit: July 08, 2009, 10:08:15 by PMedMoe »
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
~ Lao Tzu~

Offline Sea King Tech

  • Guest
  • *
  • 370
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 23
Kids Sick
« Reply #64 on: August 09, 2009, 17:19:21 »
I am wondering how the rest of you out there operate when you have a sick kid.  Lets say your kid wakes up sick and cannot go to school, your spouse has to go to work, or is allready at work and you are stuck.  You can't bring a sicko to work, not can you leave him/her unattended, not that you would want to anyway.

Options are:
-Leave pass backdated when you get back to work
-call in sick
-Arrange a short leave day from your CO, with all the hassle this entails. 

I am just looking at examples from other milpers out there.
What I do for my guys is this:
-Day off under the table for a first time thing
-2nd day, leave pass
And go from there.........your thoughts?

Offline Eye In The Sky

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 202,870
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,345
    • VP INTERNATIONAL
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #65 on: August 09, 2009, 17:21:49 »
Ummm...what about the Family Care Plan?  Isn't that supposed to be in place to cover stuff like this?
I feel the need...the NEED to FEED! - Prop Gun

Offline Sea King Tech

  • Guest
  • *
  • 370
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 23
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #66 on: August 09, 2009, 17:22:10 »
****NOR can you leave him/her unattended**** spelling

Offline Sea King Tech

  • Guest
  • *
  • 370
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 23
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #67 on: August 09, 2009, 17:23:19 »
I thought family care plans were for deployments, not sudden things.  I had 4 months notice before deploying to get my FCP up and running.

Offline Eye In The Sky

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 202,870
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 8,345
    • VP INTERNATIONAL
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #68 on: August 09, 2009, 17:37:07 »
Hmm...I am sure every unit has it own policy.  My last unit, one of the LS used to get LOTS of grief over this exact topic.  Single dad, 2 small boys, family in a different province.
I feel the need...the NEED to FEED! - Prop Gun

Offline PMedMoe

    is retired and loving it!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 249,635
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 10,254
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #69 on: August 09, 2009, 17:44:35 »
Most units should ensure that people have a care giver lined up for situations such as this.
"A good traveler has no fixed plans, and is not intent on arriving".
~ Lao Tzu~

Offline George Wallace

  • Army.ca Fossil
  • *****
  • 434,625
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 31,575
  • Crewman
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #70 on: August 09, 2009, 17:47:02 »
 ???

Have you contacted your boss about this?  Every unit I have been with, this is a no brainer; call your boss and explain the situation and see what (s)he says and follow those instructions. 
DISCLAIMER: The opinions and arguments of George Wallace posted on this Site are solely those of George Wallace and not the opinion of Army.ca and are posted for information purposes only.
Unless so stated, they are reflective of my opinion -- and my opinion only, a right that I enjoy along with every other Canadian citizen.

Offline airmich

  • Mentor
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 402,202
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,161
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #71 on: August 09, 2009, 17:48:55 »
It is going to depend on your job and your unit.  If it's a position that's easy enough to call in sick for a day here and there, it's all good.  Positions like shift workers that are counting on specific numbers so the off-coming crew can go home, it might be a bit trickier.

Bring it up with your supervisor BEFORE something occurs and see how they want you to handle it.  If it's not a common occurrence, they might be fine with a day off here and there.  The same type of situation comes up in winter too when the buses are canceled and schools closed.

Check with a neighbour or family member ahead of time and have a list of names you can call at last minute notice.  Make sure they are aware that it could be a sick child and that they are able to come to your house.  Your MFRC might have a list of caregivers too that work on an on-call basis.  Good luck.
So I'll raise a glass, not the first nor last, Come join me in this toast...Because the old black rum's got a hold on me ~ Great Big Sea

Offline Simian Turner

    is a veteran who enjoys oddities!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 48,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,624
  • Do the right thing; do the thing right!
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #72 on: August 09, 2009, 20:17:30 »
In my experience as a supervisor:

Day 1 - no problem - someone will cover for you, same as if you were sick
Day 2- can spouse take the day off to balance time away from work between parents, if not same as Day 1 decision as long as individual is not tasked
Day 3 or more - you are looking at annual leave or may be compassionate leave depending on illness and expected duration

As for the Family Care Plan - it is for the situations where the member will be absent from the home for duty reasons (not vice versa).

DAOD 5044-1: http://www.admfincs.forces.gc.ca/dao-doa/5000/5044-1-eng.asp

Excerpt:

The purpose of the family care plan (FCP) is to:

- assist members with planning for family care needs in the event of an absence for duty reasons; and
- apprise commanding officers (COs) of potential difficulties regarding family care needs that may be encountered by some members in the event of an absence for duty reasons.

Preparation and Amendment of the FCP

All Regular Force and Primary Reserve members who are responsible for providing financial, health care or other support to a family member shall prepare an FCP, fully taking into account all family care circumstances which could prevent an absence for duty reasons.

Members shall consider all possible scenarios of absence for duty reasons, including emergency call-outs, domestic and international operational deployments, collective and individual training, and short-term duty requirements.

Members shall review and amend their FCP:

- on posting when initially reporting to a new unit;
- as their family care circumstances change; and
- during the deployment preparation process.

There may be situations in which a member is required to be absent for duty reasons and breakdown of the FCP is beyond the control of the member. However, a member who does not in good faith fully take into account all known family care circumstances in the preparation of the FCP may be subject to administrative and/or disciplinary action.
« Last Edit: August 09, 2009, 20:30:28 by Frostnipped Elf »
The grand essentials of happiness: something to do, something to love, something to hope for.  Allan K. Chalmers

Offline X-mo-1979

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 11,605
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,048
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #73 on: August 09, 2009, 21:44:44 »
Depends on the guy and what were doing.If were sitting around with our thumbs inserted elsewhere,he can stay the heck home.(note not all guys...just the good workers).Depending on the severity I would direct him to compassionate leave,so I could inform higher instead of low key buck sheet days.

Crap workers can pay for child care.


If you want soldiers to work for yah treat em well at home.If they lie or mess about HAMMER THEM!

Is it fair? Nope. Neither is life.

That's my leadership principle.Those who work get rewarded.You wouldn't believe how soldiers never want to be the lazy one.

Offline ArmyVern

    is awake.

  • Army.ca Myth
  • *****
  • 207,746
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 15,536
Re: Kids Sick
« Reply #74 on: August 10, 2009, 06:57:58 »
Depends on the guy and what were doing.If were sitting around with our thumbs inserted elsewhere,he can stay the heck home.(note not all guys...just the good workers).Depending on the severity I would direct him to compassionate leave,so I could inform higher instead of low key buck sheet days.

Crap workers can pay for child care.


If you want soldiers to work for yah treat em well at home.If they lie or mess about HAMMER THEM!

Is it fair? Nope. Neither is life.

That's my leadership principle.Those who work get rewarded.You wouldn't believe how soldiers never want to be the lazy one.

Good luck having a charge stick to the "lazy worker" who gives you the old "frig you" when you attempt to dole out your double standard to him when his kid's sick and he stays home ... you've already set the precedent by allowing others to ~ that will be the precedent that sticks. As it should.

Like his sick kid has anything to do with or any say over how his dad/mom performs at work. If you worked for me and you were pulling this BS, it wouldn't be for long. Sits like this are exactly the reason that Units are supposed to have policies in place, equally applied - that's what standards are for.

Guy's a poor worker? We have other standards applicable in that situation and actual approved methods of dealing with and correcting those problems - which would be your job as the supervisor to ensure happens.

I love guys like you that hold grudges. Grudges are good in some circumstances, not in others. "Hammer them year-round with crap like this" then hammer them on their PERs too ... then wonder why they have no desire to perform for you. I just give mine their extras - and it's done with; happens again? Then we have IC, RW, C&P to go through in hopes of correcting that poor performance (or whatever sit). That's my job - to correct poor performance -- it sure isn't to frig my troops (even the poor performers) over and over again every which way I can to keep the other ones performing because they don't want to be "that guy". Correct "that guy" properly and have them all performing ~ I was quite sure that that was the actual goal.

And speaking of people putting stupid stuff in their profiles --- nice one.  ::)
« Last Edit: August 10, 2009, 07:18:34 by ArmyVern »
Hard by MCpl Elton Adams

If you or someone you love is having difficulty & would like to speak to someone who has been through a similar experience, who understands, & will respect your need for privacy and confidentiality, contact OSISS toll-free at 1-800-883-6094. You can locate the peer closest to you by logging on to www.osiss.ca, clicking on “Contact us” link & then choosing the “Peer” or “Family Support Network”. Help IS out there.