Author Topic: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.  (Read 14930 times)

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Offline A Lost Gunner

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Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« on: December 31, 2013, 21:41:14 »
Hello,

Im going to be doing some field training in February. Ive been told to have lots of gloves, socks, and underwear which all makes sense to me... Id like to know if anyone has done extended time in the winter field that could share some tips.

What kind of gloves do you like most? How many? how do you dry them...
Boots? Anything unique with foot care in the winter field?

Id like the time in the field to be more about training and less about braving the cold.

thanks

Offline ATCO

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #1 on: December 31, 2013, 22:53:30 »
From your avatar, I suspect that you are in an artillery unit  ;D

Have you done the Winter Warfare Course yet? Course code is AGLW.

Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2014, 00:20:24 »


What kind of gloves do you like most? How many? how do you dry them...

The issued Goretex gloves are pretty good.  You should pick up another pair of winter gloves or mitts ( I use a set of oakley winter gloves  ) for when your first pair of gloves become wet.  You'll also want a pair of lighter gloves that you can use inside your tent.

Bring some paracord (string) so you can make a clothes line inside your tent and a few clothes pins to hang your stuff.
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Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2014, 03:25:04 »
The issued Goretex gloves are pretty good.  You should pick up another pair of winter gloves or mitts ( I use a set of oakley winter gloves  ) for when your first pair of gloves become wet.  You'll also want a pair of lighter gloves that you can use inside your tent.

Bring some paracord (string) so you can make a clothes line inside your tent and a few clothes pins to hang your stuff.

a string that runs from one arctic mitt to the other. Commonly called idiot mitts. Although there is nothing idiotic about the application.

One weekend in the field will explain the need. Amongst other lessons learned from people that have spent time in the snow.
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Offline A Lost Gunner

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2014, 11:26:11 »
From your avatar, I suspect that you are in an artillery unit  ;D

Have you done the Winter Warfare Course yet? Course code is AGLW.

No I havent,, but once im at that point in the training cycle Ill be all over it,, im not one to pass on a training opportunity!!

( I use a set of oakley winter gloves  ) for when your first pair of gloves become wet.  You'll also want a pair of lighter gloves that you can use inside your tent.

Bring some paracord (string) so you can make a clothes line inside your tent and a few clothes pins to hang your stuff.

Beauty, I hadnt thought of clothes pins!!

Thank you.

How about protecting your feet or head, or whatever other 'secrets' you learned by time in the field??

Offline NFLD Sapper

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2014, 11:34:39 »
Hello,

Im going to be doing some field training in February. Ive been told to have lots of gloves, socks, and underwear which all makes sense to me... Id like to know if anyone has done extended time in the winter field that could share some tips.


From your avatar, I suspect that you are in an artillery unit  ;D

Have you done the Winter Warfare Course yet? Course code is AGLW.

Technically if you don't the above named course you are not supposed to employed in winter field training...
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Offline A Lost Gunner

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #6 on: January 01, 2014, 11:46:06 »
Technically if you don't the above named course you are not supposed to employed in winter field training...

Interesting, Im doing SQ in Wainwright in Feb, the final week of SQ is in the field, isnt it?

Offline NFLD Sapper

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #7 on: January 01, 2014, 11:48:27 »
That's different, that is a bolt-on MOD for the SQ course...
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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #8 on: January 01, 2014, 12:28:37 »
When it wasn't *really* cold, I would just use my green glove liners (old combat gloves) inside my arctic mitts (removed the mitt liner), so I had something on my fingers when I had to take the mitt off.  When it was cold, I wore the glove liners inside the arctic mitt w/liner.

Using the paracord rig RecceGuy described above along with the liners from my combat gloves, my arctic mitts never got lost or dropped in the snow and my fingers never got too cold. 

Feet; change socks when they are wet.  Always and asap. 

Head; the new LWTH is pretty decent, I used to put my scarf on top of my head/around my neck and then put my toque on top of that.  Always warm.

Buy a cheap battery powered electric razor.  Blade shaving can be a real PITA.

Make sure your mukluks/duffle socks fit properly and you have both the felt liner and green insole; both are needed for proper fit and insulation.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2014, 12:32:58 by Eye In The Sky »
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Offline A Lost Gunner

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #9 on: January 01, 2014, 13:50:15 »
Thanks EyeInTheSky, Ill keep it all in mind.
I appreciate the info

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #10 on: January 01, 2014, 15:17:46 »
One more;  you are better off being a little cool rather than a little hot.  Avoid sweating.  Dress in layers so you can add/remove as needed.  I remember having nothing but a t shirt on top during winter ex before as #1 on the toboggan with FMO on.   It was well below freezing.  Never sweat if you can help it.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2014, 19:05:03 by Eye In The Sky »
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Offline ballz

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #11 on: January 01, 2014, 17:54:34 »
If you do end up sleeping outside a heated tent (or inside an unheated one), I have found this works pretty well for my boots. This is probably more useful for the times of the year when its warm enough to be wet/damp during the day and then drops to -15 or -20 at night, but good to know none the less.

Turn valise inside out (keeps snow/water/mud/etc) on the outside of your valise instead of inside.
Insert boots into your inside-out valise (keeps snow/water/mud/etc) off of you and your sleeping bag.
Place valise-covered boots underneath your knees, inside your sleeping bag, when you sleep. I also sleep inside a fleece liner, so I place it outside the fleece liner but inside the sleeping bag and don't even know it's there.

The effect is, when you wake up, your boots/mukluks/whatever aren't frozen stiff (especially if they were wet), and you and your sleeping bag are not wet.

I know some people who just put their boots in their valise overnight, and had to wake up and use pliers to pull the laces through and then put their feet in an ice block. They are clearly too tough for their own good.

I also know some people who put them in their sleeping bag, but after a night or two their sleeping bag started getting wet inside / muddy during the night... not very fun.
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Offline Towards_the_gap

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #12 on: January 01, 2014, 19:50:15 »
Everyone here has missed the #1 top tip for survival in winter conditions.

Ensure you are in a mechanised unit.  ;D

 You will find yourself with your own portable heater/electrical supply/clothes dryer/hot water supplier(CBU), all of which is helpfully contained within a transportation device, saving you the drudgery of tobaggon pulling.

You can thank me later.


On a serious note, drop some shekels and get yourself a Petzl headlamp. No I'm not a rep, I just have consistently found them to be the best constructed, longest lasting headlamp. Don't go cheap and get the energizer, canadian tire headlamps, except maybe as a backup. Handsfree lighting will make your life just that little bit easier. They are even demandable through the system, but unless you are a combat engineer you will have a hard time getting them.
« Last Edit: January 01, 2014, 19:55:58 by Towards_the_gap »

Offline Fishbone Jones

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #13 on: January 01, 2014, 19:54:47 »
Everyone here has missed the #1 top tip for survival in winter conditions.

Ensure you are in a mechanised unit.  ;D

 You will find yourself with your own portable heater/electrical supply/clothes dryer/hot water supplier(CBU), all of which is helpfully contained within a transportation device, saving you the drudgery of tobaggon pulling.

You can thank me later.

Yup. Put everything in the trucksack ;D
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Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #14 on: January 01, 2014, 20:12:51 »
On a serious note, drop some shekels and get yourself a Petzl headlamp.

I have a 1st gen Tikka XP, was even able to get a colored lens kit for it (red/blue/green).  Still gets great life out of 3 AAs.  Has that 'spotlight' feature.  Nice piece of kit.
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Offline PPCLI Guy

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #15 on: January 01, 2014, 21:55:30 »
Wear your issue kit, in the manner in which it is designed to be worn. 

Listen to your Sect Comd.

That is all.
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Offline Jarnhamar

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #16 on: January 01, 2014, 22:15:03 »
Visine eye drops, fumes from the stove and lantern will collect in the tent and irritate your eyeballs.

If you're going to swap you air mattress with someone elses that actually works make sure you take one without a name. Especially make sure not to take your platoon commanders.
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Offline Ostrozac

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #17 on: January 01, 2014, 23:10:39 »
Wear your issue kit, in the manner in which it is designed to be worn. 

And if the supply system hasn't given you critical equipment -- then tell your boss. Missing equipment in the summer is an annoyance -- in the winter you can really hurt yourself if you're not dressed for it. So if you don't have mukluks, mittens, windpants, long underwear, a tuque -- then say something before you try working in -40 temperatures.

Offline MedCorps

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #18 on: January 02, 2014, 08:41:11 »

Make sure your mukluks/duffle socks fit properly and you have both the felt liner and green insole; both are needed for proper fit and insulation.

This is super important.  It always amazes me when even experienced soldiers wear the mukluk without the complete system and are cold / uncomfortable.  Also make sure you have two pairs of duffle socks, one to wear and one to dry. 

Also be careful when pouring fuels in the cold... especially naphtha.

Keep your kit clean as possible.  Do not allow yourself to overheat. 

MC

Offline George Wallace

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #19 on: January 02, 2014, 09:19:20 »
Everyone here has missed the #1 top tip for survival in winter conditions.

Ensure you are in a mechanised unit.  ;D

 You will find yourself with your own portable heater/electrical supply/clothes dryer/hot water supplier(CBU), all of which is helpfully contained within a transportation device, saving you the drudgery of tobaggon pulling.

You can thank me later.

Of course, when that heater doesn't work (very common occurrence), you are inside up to 50 tonnes of frozen metal.   Now the back deck of the Leopard will keep you toasty warm, without the need of arctic sleeping bags, all night, finally turning to ice around 0600 hrs in time for Reveille.  :nod:

On a serious note, drop some shekels and get yourself a Petzl headlamp. No I'm not a rep, I just have consistently found them to be the best constructed, longest lasting headlamp. Don't go cheap and get the energizer, canadian tire headlamps, except maybe as a backup. Handsfree lighting will make your life just that little bit easier. They are even demandable through the system, but unless you are a combat engineer you will have a hard time getting them.

A very handy piece of kit, indeed.
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Offline Fdtrucker

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Re: Winter training. Hands, feet, and head.
« Reply #20 on: January 02, 2014, 09:30:24 »
Remember the principles of keeping warm - COLD. C - Clean clothing, O - Overheating must be avoided, L- Loose and layered clothing, D - Dry Clothing