• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

What book are you reading now?

Colin Parkinson

Army.ca Legend
Reaction score
2,025
Points
940
Reading the Naval Memoirs of Sir Roger Keyes the beginning of the book is about his time overseeing the development and deployment of the early sub fleet and the technology challenges they faced. Now I am into the Dardanelles Campaign and it's interesting to hear what they believe would be the political gain of forcing the passage and destroying the Turkish fleet. Written 1934.
 

CBH99

Army.ca Veteran
Donor
Reaction score
766
Points
1,090
I know it’s fairly mainstream, and I’m late to read it. But I started Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink on Friday.

So far, enjoying it. Nothing none of us don’t already know, but it’s highlighting things in my life Ive become far too complacent about & didn’t even know it.
 

FJAG

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
2,284
Points
1,040
Okay. I've just started reading Peter Kasurak's A National Force: The Evolution of the Canadian Army, 1950-2000 and am only at page 15 but have already concluded this guy's got a massive hate on for all things British. Mind you I like the one quote he cites when talking about the Commonwealth following a standardized (i.e. British) divisional organization in the 1930s and attempts by a non-Brit to change anything:

Hence, a Dominion officer who feels it is his duty to suggest improvements in military organization must argue the case for a change in all the Empire's forces, taking cognizance of the whole range of the army's duties, from first-class warfare to the suppression of religious maniacs in abominable deserts.

Sounds like what's facing us in the Force 2025 thread and real life.

Notwithstanding this nugget, I have a feeling I'm off on a bit of a wasted journey here. Time will tell.

🍻
 

TCM621

Sr. Member
Subscriber
Reaction score
185
Points
430
I just finished Explaining Postmodernism by a Stephen Hicks. It does a very good job explaining the philosophical routes of Postmodernism back the Kant and Hegel. It also pre-dates the current focus on Postmodernism by about a decade so it doesn't seem reactionary.

I have also just started Chaos under Heaven by Josh Rogin about China under Xi Jinping.

Of a less political variety, I just finished The Anarchist's Workbench by Christopher Shwartz. He writes great books on traditional wood working and this book is a great twist on building a traditional style workbench.

I also just started a Woodworker's Apprentice by Roy Underhill from PBS's the Woodwright's shop. He has been teaching traditional woodworking for decades now.
 

FJAG

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
2,284
Points
1,040
"I alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year" by Carol Leonning and Philip Rucker.


A much better book than Woodward's latest effort. This one is well written and well researched. Numerous sources from within the White House contributed and laid open quite a view of the inner workings of what was a highly dysfunctional presidency. I surprisingly ended up with much more respect for William Barr than I thought I'd be able to muster. Clearly one of the few adults in the administration. On the other hand not enough contempt can be flung into the faces of Rudy Giuliani or White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows or Michael Flynn.

This book is a serious cautionary tale. Even when someone is as blatantly and overtly destructive of the basic principles of democracy, there will be enough enablers come out of the woodwork to give effect to his ravings. Leonning clearly demonstrates just how close-run thing Trump's insurrection was, how he was able to and continues to foster mass delusion within the Republican and how just a handful of Republicans, like Pence, Christy, McConnel held the line.

Highly recommended.

🍻
 

dimsum

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
1,793
Points
1,040

To Boldly Go: Leadership, Strategy, and Conflict in the 21st Century and Beyond​



It seems dry by the title, but it's a collection (with one of the editors being Steven Leonard, or "Doctrine Man" as he's better known on the Internet) of short articles by various authors interweaving science fiction and military topics. So, stuff like examining the civil-military leadership relationship using Battlestar Galactica's Adama and Roslyn, or a GBA+ article on why the Rebel Alliance cockpits were only designed for humanoids.

It was a great read (maybe less so for people who hate sci-fi) and highly recommended. Plus, the articles are generally 3-4 pages long so you don't feel the need to spend hours on it at a time. I spaced (ha!) it out over a month and a half.
 

FJAG

Army.ca Fixture
Reaction score
2,284
Points
1,040

To Boldly Go: Leadership, Strategy, and Conflict in the 21st Century and Beyond​



It seems dry by the title, but it's a collection (with one of the editors being Steven Leonard, or "Doctrine Man" as he's better known on the Internet) of short articles by various authors interweaving science fiction and military topics. So, stuff like examining the civil-military leadership relationship using Battlestar Galactica's Adama and Roslyn, or a GBA+ article on why the Rebel Alliance cockpits were only designed for humanoids.

It was a great read (maybe less so for people who hate sci-fi) and highly recommended. Plus, the articles are generally 3-4 pages long so you don't feel the need to spend hours on it at a time. I spaced (ha!) it out over a month and a half.

I've always been a fan of science fiction, not just because of the great stories, but because it generally challenges the lethargy of bureaucracy by asking the question "what if?". In fact, if you're an old time reader of sci-fi like me you get disturbed by the fact that many of the predictions of what technology would exist in the 24th century are already in the hands of our children, much less the military, today.

It's about time that science fiction became part of the reading curriculum of professional military schools to largely augment military history. History runs in two directions and while I don't discount the lessons of the past, the predictions for the future should guide our way even more so. Can you imagine what the future could hold if we let some of the many concepts of Scalzi's Old Man's War guide our research and development - BrainPals; SmartBlood; MP-35 high-density, nano-robotic ammunition blocks?

:unsure:
 

dimsum

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
1,793
Points
1,040
It's about time that science fiction became part of the reading curriculum of professional military schools to largely augment military history.
Books like Starship Troopers and Ender's Game are already part of the USMC Commandant's reading list, and some others as well.

Not sure about newer stuff, but I heard about this book through NavyCon, so I have a feeling that some professional military schools are doing this already.

Funny enough, the CAF is cited in this book's foreword as one of the original leaders in this vein of thought with "Crisis in Zefra". The RAF, US Army, USMC, and others followed suit.
 

Weinie

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1,327
Points
1,110
I am partway through reading "The Tiger's Prey' by Wilbur Smith, who unfortunately died today at 88. I have read about 25 of his books. Good yarns all. RIP Wilbur, and thanks.
 

FormerHorseGuard

Sr. Member
Reaction score
66
Points
280
Has anyone started the new WEB Griffin book written by Brian Andrews and Jeffery Wilson

ROGUE ASSET

one of the Presidential Agent Novels.
I really enjoy reading the books, but always leery of new authors taking over a series of books.

any opinions yet?

Opie
 

dimsum

Army.ca Fixture
Mentor
Reaction score
1,793
Points
1,040
Finished Leviathan Falls, the last book in the Expanse series.

I wasn't sure how it would go, but they seemed to wrap things up nicely. Too bad the TV series won't go as far as the books.
 

FSTO

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
484
Points
960
Just about finished Margaret MacMillan's "War, how conflict shape us". Will then tackle Bruce Jones "To Rule the Waves"
 

dangerboy

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Mentor
Reaction score
426
Points
1,130
Logistics in the Falklands War
By Kenneth L.Privratsky
Genre: Military History

I will be the first to admit that I don’t pay enough attention to military logistics as I should. It has always been black magic, where stuff magically appears when you need it. Now, I know that is not really magic and that it requires work by people to make supplies appear but as I said I never really thought much about it.

This book goes over the challenges that the British Forces had in 1982 when they went to war with Argentina over the fate of the Falklands Islands, deciding if they would remain British Territory or if they would become Argentinian. The book covered these main logistics phases: 1) preparing to move the men, equipment, and supplies 2) Shipping the men, equipment, and supplies. 3) The amphibious assault to gain an initial foothold on the East Falklands Islands 4) Suppling the forces as they advanced inland 5) The post-war issues, dealing with the prisoners of war, supplying the civilian population, and restoring the infrastructure of the islands.

This conflict had some unique challenges that the British had not faced in quite a number of years. The primary being the distance, it is roughly 8,000 miles (12,875 km) from the UK to the Falklands Islands with the only staging area being the Ascension Islands which is about ½ way. The second was the fact that the British did not have air superiority, and this fact cost them hard. The Argentinian forces were able to penetrate the British air defence and caused major damage which caused havoc with the logistics effort. Finally, the actual terrain that they were fighting in, the islands are an inhospitable place that with the exception of inside the towns has no road or transportation network so it is hard to move supplies across the territory.

The author does a great job of explaining how the British forces handled these issues and were successful in supplying their forces enabling them to recapture the Islands and force the surrender of the invading Argentinian forces (spoiler 😊). He also explains what is going on in the actual war and some of the background to the conflict so if you are not overly familiar with the conflict you will not be lost reading this book.
If you are like me and not very knowledgeable about logistics issues then I recommend reading this book, I think you will find it quite enlightening. I also recommend it to anyone that is just interested in military history.

Logistics.jpg
 

Blackadder1916

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
564
Points
1,060
Logistics in the Falklands War
By Kenneth L.Privratsky
Genre: Military History

I will be the first to admit that I don’t pay enough attention to military logistics as I should. It has always been black magic, where stuff magically appears when you need it. Now, I know that is not really magic and that it requires work by people to make supplies appear but as I said I never really thought much about it.

I hadn't seen that one previously, thanks.

In the same vein, I would recommend "Moving Mountains: Lessons in Leadership and Logistics from the Gulf War" by William G. Pagonis. LtGen (ret'd) Pagonis was the US theater logistics commander during the Gulf War. His book has been on my military/leadership shelf for at least 25 years. Besides a good read, I also had an opportunity to listen to him at a conference a couple of decades ago, an example of his style and message here. And yes, I did use 3x5 index cards for a while.
 

grayzone

Guest
Reaction score
1
Points
180
J'ai serré la main du diable -RD

Which I erroniously thought was originally written in french.

Any other Francos find some of the verb tenses off in the FR version?
I was reading aloud and got totally tripped up a few times... now I'm wondering if I accidentally have forgotten my native tongue, or if the translation was just a little off...
 
Last edited:

grayzone

Guest
Reaction score
1
Points
180
"Canada's Army" by JL Granatstein

"Don't Eat this book" by Morgan Spurlock. So far, overly dependant on statistics without details to explain what he is trying to prove.
the "Don't Eat this book" title reminded me of:
"Sex in the Snow" by Michael Adams about Canadian demographics and values, due to it's odd title.

The premise is that though generations have been shown to share values within age groups, these groups are no longer holding to their cohorts, rather their values evolved and transcend beyond their age groups Thus, while one's generation once indicated with some reliability their value-set, this is no longer the case.
 
Top