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What book are you reading now?

Colin Parkinson

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Reading the Naval Memoirs of Sir Roger Keyes the beginning of the book is about his time overseeing the development and deployment of the early sub fleet and the technology challenges they faced. Now I am into the Dardanelles Campaign and it's interesting to hear what they believe would be the political gain of forcing the passage and destroying the Turkish fleet. Written 1934.
 

CBH99

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I know it’s fairly mainstream, and I’m late to read it. But I started Extreme Ownership by Jocko Willink on Friday.

So far, enjoying it. Nothing none of us don’t already know, but it’s highlighting things in my life Ive become far too complacent about & didn’t even know it.
 

FJAG

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Okay. I've just started reading Peter Kasurak's A National Force: The Evolution of the Canadian Army, 1950-2000 and am only at page 15 but have already concluded this guy's got a massive hate on for all things British. Mind you I like the one quote he cites when talking about the Commonwealth following a standardized (i.e. British) divisional organization in the 1930s and attempts by a non-Brit to change anything:

Hence, a Dominion officer who feels it is his duty to suggest improvements in military organization must argue the case for a change in all the Empire's forces, taking cognizance of the whole range of the army's duties, from first-class warfare to the suppression of religious maniacs in abominable deserts.

Sounds like what's facing us in the Force 2025 thread and real life.

Notwithstanding this nugget, I have a feeling I'm off on a bit of a wasted journey here. Time will tell.

🍻
 

TCM621

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I just finished Explaining Postmodernism by a Stephen Hicks. It does a very good job explaining the philosophical routes of Postmodernism back the Kant and Hegel. It also pre-dates the current focus on Postmodernism by about a decade so it doesn't seem reactionary.

I have also just started Chaos under Heaven by Josh Rogin about China under Xi Jinping.

Of a less political variety, I just finished The Anarchist's Workbench by Christopher Shwartz. He writes great books on traditional wood working and this book is a great twist on building a traditional style workbench.

I also just started a Woodworker's Apprentice by Roy Underhill from PBS's the Woodwright's shop. He has been teaching traditional woodworking for decades now.
 

FJAG

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"I alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump's Catastrophic Final Year" by Carol Leonning and Philip Rucker.


A much better book than Woodward's latest effort. This one is well written and well researched. Numerous sources from within the White House contributed and laid open quite a view of the inner workings of what was a highly dysfunctional presidency. I surprisingly ended up with much more respect for William Barr than I thought I'd be able to muster. Clearly one of the few adults in the administration. On the other hand not enough contempt can be flung into the faces of Rudy Giuliani or White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows or Michael Flynn.

This book is a serious cautionary tale. Even when someone is as blatantly and overtly destructive of the basic principles of democracy, there will be enough enablers come out of the woodwork to give effect to his ravings. Leonning clearly demonstrates just how close-run thing Trump's insurrection was, how he was able to and continues to foster mass delusion within the Republican and how just a handful of Republicans, like Pence, Christy, McConnel held the line.

Highly recommended.

🍻
 

dimsum

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To Boldly Go: Leadership, Strategy, and Conflict in the 21st Century and Beyond​



It seems dry by the title, but it's a collection (with one of the editors being Steven Leonard, or "Doctrine Man" as he's better known on the Internet) of short articles by various authors interweaving science fiction and military topics. So, stuff like examining the civil-military leadership relationship using Battlestar Galactica's Adama and Roslyn, or a GBA+ article on why the Rebel Alliance cockpits were only designed for humanoids.

It was a great read (maybe less so for people who hate sci-fi) and highly recommended. Plus, the articles are generally 3-4 pages long so you don't feel the need to spend hours on it at a time. I spaced (ha!) it out over a month and a half.
 

FJAG

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To Boldly Go: Leadership, Strategy, and Conflict in the 21st Century and Beyond​



It seems dry by the title, but it's a collection (with one of the editors being Steven Leonard, or "Doctrine Man" as he's better known on the Internet) of short articles by various authors interweaving science fiction and military topics. So, stuff like examining the civil-military leadership relationship using Battlestar Galactica's Adama and Roslyn, or a GBA+ article on why the Rebel Alliance cockpits were only designed for humanoids.

It was a great read (maybe less so for people who hate sci-fi) and highly recommended. Plus, the articles are generally 3-4 pages long so you don't feel the need to spend hours on it at a time. I spaced (ha!) it out over a month and a half.

I've always been a fan of science fiction, not just because of the great stories, but because it generally challenges the lethargy of bureaucracy by asking the question "what if?". In fact, if you're an old time reader of sci-fi like me you get disturbed by the fact that many of the predictions of what technology would exist in the 24th century are already in the hands of our children, much less the military, today.

It's about time that science fiction became part of the reading curriculum of professional military schools to largely augment military history. History runs in two directions and while I don't discount the lessons of the past, the predictions for the future should guide our way even more so. Can you imagine what the future could hold if we let some of the many concepts of Scalzi's Old Man's War guide our research and development - BrainPals; SmartBlood; MP-35 high-density, nano-robotic ammunition blocks?

:unsure:
 

dimsum

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It's about time that science fiction became part of the reading curriculum of professional military schools to largely augment military history.
Books like Starship Troopers and Ender's Game are already part of the USMC Commandant's reading list, and some others as well.

Not sure about newer stuff, but I heard about this book through NavyCon, so I have a feeling that some professional military schools are doing this already.

Funny enough, the CAF is cited in this book's foreword as one of the original leaders in this vein of thought with "Crisis in Zefra". The RAF, US Army, USMC, and others followed suit.
 

Weinie

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I am partway through reading "The Tiger's Prey' by Wilbur Smith, who unfortunately died today at 88. I have read about 25 of his books. Good yarns all. RIP Wilbur, and thanks.
 
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