Virtual reality training of ship’s power generation and distribution system

OceanBonfire

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PO2 Gillies from Naval Personnel Training Group assists in the filming of a training video with a film crew from Race Rocks 3D. Photo by PO1 Beaulieu./Le M 2 Gillies du Groupe d’instruction du personnel naval participe au tournage d’une vidéo d’instruction avec une équipe de tournage de RaceRocks 3 D. Photo par M 1 Beaulieu


New training videos

Peter Mallett

A new tool in the training box of Naval Fleet School is currently being developed.

Contracted by Naval Training Development Center Pacific (NTDC(P)), Race Rocks 3D is creating a fully functioning virtual reality version of the ship’s power generation and distribution system. It will include a series of instructional videos to be used in tandem with the virtual task trainer.

By utilizing this technology, NTDC(P) hopes to enable naval trainees to hone their practical skills before placing them in real-world scenarios. This will also help propel current naval training into the future, and fulfill the vision of the Future Naval Training Strategy – to produce a world-class training system that fosters excellence at sea.

Currently, phase two of the development shows trainees how to:

- Sync a generator at the switchboard;
- Parallel a generator with shore power at the switchboard; and
- Reset a load shed condition.

Created by the Program Support Services section of the Learning Support Center division of the NTDC(P), and Race Rocks 3D, this technology can be facilitated in-class or remotely, allowing trainees to learn at their own pace at any time via the Defence Learning Network (DLN). The program can be accessed at the convenience of the trainees via a tablet or computer onboard the ship, or remotely from their own devices.

In the program, trainees or current sailors who need a refresher can decide what level of instruction they need while looking at an interactive, exact replica of a Halifax-class frigate switchboard. Trainees can watch videos that walk them through tasks step-by-step; they can choose to be walked through each step via a series of on-screen instructions; or they can test themselves by completing the tasks without assistance. If they make an error, the program will show them where they went wrong, and what steps they can take to correct it.

Training includes losing power on a warship, which is critical and can have catastrophic effects. This type of skill-development is essential in creating sailors who have competency with confidence in extreme pressure situations – the kind of situation naval trainees may have to face.

Since this kind of training cannot be duplicated ashore in a traditional classroom setting, this program offers a green and sustainable solution that can be updated whenever necessary.

In addition, there are limited opportunities for ships that can facilitate this training due to a significant number of them being on missions, and those alongside often lack functioning equipment due to maintenance.

Furthermore, with ships understaffed, this program can save time for personnel who have a multitude of tasks to complete in a day, in addition to facilitating training for others.

The videos and virtual reality version of the ship’s power generation and distribution system trainer are set to be released in 2020.

https://ml-fd.caf-fac.ca/en/2019/12/35584
 

chrisf

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Since this kind of training cannot be duplicated ashore in a traditional classroom setting, this program offers a green and sustainable solution that can be updated whenever necessary.

Virtual training and videos sound awesome...

I've got a question this part though... can totally simulate any of it in a classroom, it's just more expensive.
 

NavyShooter

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I sent instructors to Quebec (City) a number of years ago to help them develop the Maintenance Procedural Trainer (MPT) programs for the CANTASS and HMS.  This was designed to be a supplement to the equipment we had and used for instruction - it has since mostly replaced it, and training is now done mostly on MPT (100%MPT for some systems) and the first time sailors see the actual equipment they are responsible to maintain is when the arrive in the fleet.

That was not a good thing. 

Learning about power distribution systems is good...but you will never actually *KNOW* them until you've walked the spaces and found the breakers for your gear, one after another. 

That is my professional opinion as a former NET(A).

NS
 

Navy_Pete

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Not a Sig Op said:
Virtual training and videos sound awesome...

I've got a question this part though... can totally simulate any of it in a classroom, it's just more expensive.

The RN has a couple of former hangers in Portsmouth full of old generators, a few gas turbines, a switchboard and some other auxiliaries. Some are non-functional that they use for practicing things (like rebuilding parts, piston inspections, etc, but the GTs are on dynos and they have two separate generators that both work.  Throughout the training you learn how to troubleshoot all of them, and your final test is to 'flash up the plant' like you are going to sea. It's a world class facility, and top tier training. Someone looked at duplicating it in Halifax and it would have cost a fortune, but they sourced the systems from retired ships/equipment, or even other government agencies (like a few diesels out of trains), so wasn't something they built overnight.

Have similar experience to NavyShooter; these are great supplemental trainers, but really shouldn't be used as a full replacement.  Pretty easy to do up a mock up of the IPMS functions and simulate the switchboard, but this can't replace doing it for real. It's a pretty easy one to do training on on a ship as well; you can seamlessly do it as part of normal generation synchronizing and doesn't need to be in a blackout condition.  If we can coordinate blackout drills while deployed in a low threat area of a theatre, shouldn't be any reason you can't manage it.
 

midget-boyd91

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Just curious to know if anyone out there has any info on what courses are running at what time of the year.
The East coast has been opened up training for all trades that had previously only been offered at Esquimault, but do they always run courses simultaneously on each coast?

Looking in particular for course dates for NCI Op and Nav Comm, and if any courses for those trades are scheduled at Fleet School Atlantic, if that info available. 

Thanks
Feel free to move/merge with another thread if needed.
 
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