This concept of a drone ambulance promises to revolutionise emergency operations

Jarnhamar

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In the upcoming videogame Cyberpunk 2077 there's a gameplay trailer where an injured womans monitored vital signs sets off a alarm and V/STOL drone looking ambulance with tactical medic team is dispatched to pick her up. Science fiction and the article is 5 years old but maybe this is something we'll see in the near future?


This concept of a drone ambulance promises to revolutionise emergency operations
A design firm from Austin, Texas, has designed a drone ambulance that promises to speed up emergency support in rural areas and provide quick treatment for major traffic accidents.

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https://www.businessinsider.com/drone-ambulance-concept-with-amazing-images-2015-2


Not as cool as infantry soldiers flying over hard-to-pass terrain with jetpacks but could be a life saver with urban sprawl and traffic.
 

mariomike

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Jarnhamar said:
This concept of a drone ambulance promises to revolutionise emergency operations
A design firm from Austin, Texas, has designed a drone ambulance that promises to speed up emergency support in rural areas and provide quick treatment for major traffic accidents.

I got scolded for referring to it as a "drone".  :)

mariomike said:
Urban ( non-military ) use of drones in severe traffic congestion.

Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxXjlxR7fhE

Eye In The Sky said:
If a aerospace vehicle has a pilot, it is not a drone.  Drone's are pre-programmed before launch, fly a pre-programmed flight profile, with no pilot interaction.  If is has a pilot, or requires a pilot, it is a RPA/UAS/UAV/etc, but not a drone.  Pretty simple concept, if you don't disregard reality.
 

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reveng

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Jarnhamar said:
Not as cool as infantry soldiers flying over hard-to-pass terrain with jetpacks

Maybe not Heinlein, but you might find hybrid UAS/UGV concepts interesting.
 

dimsum

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The drone is also very small: it is the size of a compact car, meaning that it would be able to land on a street, while helicopters still need a lot of preparation on the ground before they can land.

That is from the article.  I'm not a fling-wing guy but wouldn't that aircraft have the same preparation requirements as helicopters?
 

mariomike

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Dimsum said:
That is from the article.  I'm not a fling-wing guy but wouldn't that aircraft have the same preparation requirements as helicopters?

Calling in an ambulance helicopter ( ie: ORNGE ) is a "big deal".

The paramedic shall:
1. assess the scene response to meet one or more of the following operational criteria:
a. The land ambulance is estimated to require more than 30 minutes to reach the scene and the air ambulance can reach the scene quicker.
b. The land ambulance is estimated to require more than 30 minutes to travel from the scene to the closest appropriate hospital* and the air ambulance helicopter can reach the scene and transport the patient to the closest appropriate hospital* quicker than the land ambulance.
c. The estimated response for both land and air is estimated to be greater than 30 minutes, but approximately equal, and the patient needs advanced paramedic level care which cannot be provided by the responding land ambulance.
d. There are multiple patients who meet the clinical criteria and the local land ambulance resources are already being fully utilized.
2. if the scene response meets the requirements of paragraph 1 above, assess the patient to determine if he/she meets one or more of the following clinical criteria:
a. Patients meeting the criteria listed in the Field Trauma Triage Standard.
b. Patients meeting one or more of the following:
i. Medical:
1. Shock, especially hypotension with altered mentation (e.g. suspected aortic aneurysm rupture, massive GI bleed, severe sepsis, anaphylaxis, cardiogenic shock, etc.)
2. Acute stroke with a clearly determined time of onset or last known to be normal <3.0 hours
3. Altered level of consciousness (GCS <10)
4. Acute respiratory failure or distress
5. Suspected STEMI or potentially lethal dysrhythmia
6. Resuscitation from respiratory or cardiac arrest
7. Status epilepticus
8. Unstable airway or partial airway obstruction
ii. Obstetrical:
1. Active labour with abnormal presentation (i.e. shoulder, breech or limb)
2. Multiple gestation and active labour
3. Umbilical cord prolapse
4. Significant vaginal bleeding (suspected placental abruption or placenta previa or ectopic pregnancy);
3. in conjunction with the ACO, assess if an on-scene air ambulance helicopter is appropriate, based on:
a. the perceived severity of the reported injuries and without confirmation that the clinical criteria have been met, or
b. the patient cannot reasonably be reached by land ambulance (e.g. sites without road access such as islands; geographically isolated places, etc.);
4. if the requirements listed in paragraph 2 or 3 above are met, request an on-scene air ambulance helicopter response:
a. Provide the ACO with the information set out in operational and clinical criteria above. In order for the ACO to determine if an air ambulance response and transport will be quicker than land ambulance, the paramedic will provide the ACO with the estimated time to prepare the patient for transport, identify separately any time required for patient extrication, provide the estimated land ambulance driving time to the closest appropriate hospital* and any additional information as required.
b. The paramedics shall not delay patient transport by waiting for the air ambulance helicopter, unless the air ambulance helicopter can be seen on its final approach to the scene. If the air ambulance helicopter is en route but not on final approach to the scene, and the land paramedics have the patient in his/her ambulance, then the land ambulance will proceed to the closest local hospital with an emergency department. The air ambulance helicopter will proceed to that local hospital and, if appropriate, assist hospital personnel prepare the patient for rapid evacuation.
c. While en route to the local hospital, paramedics may rendezvous with the air ambulance helicopter if:
i. the air ambulance helicopter is able to land along the direct route of the land ambulance; and
ii. it would result in a significant reduction in transport time to the most appropriate hospital*.
*Note: The closest appropriate hospital for on-scene call patients assessed as meeting the criteria specified within the Field Trauma Triage Standard is the closest LTH.
5. if the call’s circumstances and patient(s) fail to meet the criteria set out in this standard and an air ambulance helicopter is known to be responding based on the merits of the initial request for ambulance service, contact the CACC/ACS and advise that an on-scene air ambulance helicopter response is not required and why it is not required.
Air Ambulance Helicopter Landing Site Safety and Coordination
Upon confirmation that the air ambulance helicopter is responding, the paramedic shall designate a Landing Site Coordinator to take the following actions to coordinate the safe landing of the air ambulance helicopter while maintaining the safety of the scene.
Wear Safety Apparel
• Don and secure a high visibility vest or coat
• Don and secure a safety helmet with visor
• Wear safety goggles or safety eyewear
Landing Site Selection
The air ambulance helicopter pilot-in-command is responsible for selecting the landing site and has the final decision on whether or not to land. Using the air ambulance helicopter airborne vantage point, the pilot-in-command will select a site that best meets the following conditions:
• A site that will not affect the rescue efforts underway.
• A clear area of approximately 45 meters x 45 meters.
• A safety area, extending approximately an additional 30 meters for the purpose of controlling vehicle and personnel access during landing and take-off.
• The landing site should be away from overhead wires and utility poles.
• The surface should be as flat as possible.
• No loose debris should be within the landing site or the safety area; check ditches.
• Gravel and sand sites should be avoided, if possible, due to the potential of injury from flying dust particles and reduced visibility.
Site Safety
• No vehicles or personnel are allowed within the landing site and safety area during landing and take-off.
• Vehicle doors, windows, and access compartments should be closed.
• Stretchers should be left in the ambulance and all loose articles secured.
• If requested by the flight crew, the Landing Site Coordinator will stand at the upwind edge of the safety area, back to the wind and facing the site, to maintain security during landing and take-off.
• If site security is compromised, such as personnel or vehicles entering the safety area, the Landing Site Coordinator is to wave off the air ambulance helicopter by crossing outstretched arms over his/her head.
Safely Working Around a Helicopter
• Stay out of the safety area and landing site during landing and take-off.
• Approach or depart only when directed by a member of the air crew.
• Do not approach the helicopter from the rear as the tail rotor is difficult to see.
• If on uneven ground, approach and depart from the downhill side.
• Carry all equipment horizontally at or below waist level, never over shoulder.
• Ensure hats, scarves, gloves, glasses and any other loose articles are secure before entering the safety area.
Other Use of Air Ambulance Helicopter
• Air ambulance helicopters are not permitted to respond to night calls which require a landing at a site other than night licensed airports, helipads or night approved remote landing sites.
• Air ambulance helicopters are not permitted to conduct search and rescue calls. For purposes of this section, Search and Rescue is defined as “The act of looking diligently to find a patient whose exact location is not known, and, once located, requires removal from the location using specialized tools and skills outside the scope of EMS practice.”
• In cases where a land ambulance can reach the patient(s) and an on-scene response by air ambulance helicopter is appropriate, the ACO will assign a land ambulance and continue the land response until the flight crew requests that the land ambulance be cancelled.
• In cases where a land ambulance arrives on-scene prior to the air ambulance helicopter, paramedics shall inform the CACC/ACS as clinical events occur.

 

Good2Golf

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Circumferentially-faired rotors/fans would make it a fair bit easier to get into tight spaces than standard EMS choppers. Airflow and debris would still be a factor, but as counter-gravitational propulsion comes into play in years to come, the parasitical effects of unintended lift force against debris, spectators and other objects in the immediate area around the incident PZ would be reduced.

Additionally, you could missionize the drone with plug-in service modules, and make it multi-role, so pizza delivery with a FoodSafeTM-compliant temperature-controlled food module, then swap it out for a GoldenHourTM ambu-kit and re-task to pick up a patient. :nod:
 

daftandbarmy

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Recently we provided the City of Vancouver with  report on the use of AI, like drones, in municipal operations, like fire and emergency services.

Beyond the fact that it's currently illegal, AI technology is at least 20 years away from being useable, economically, safely and reliably in a municipal setting.

 

reveng

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Good2Golf said:
Airflow and debris would still be a factor, but as counter-gravitational propulsion comes into play in years to come, the parasitical effects of unintended lift force against debris, spectators and other objects in the immediate area around the incident PZ would be reduced.

Inertial mass reduction pizza delivery?
 

armyvern

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mariomike said:
Calling in an ambulance helicopter ( ie: ORNGE ) is a "big deal".

Fuck; you'd think they could figure out a way to get it down to a simple 9 liner eh, perhaps with a pop of smoke?

Someone should try that.
 

daftandbarmy

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ArmyVern said:
frig; you'd think they could figure out a way to get it down to a simple 9 liner eh, perhaps with a pop of smoke?

Someone should try that.

It seems Ornge has a different funding model though, which might conflict with that 'bare bones' approach :)

Kick back allegations

After Ornge bought helicopters from AgustaWestland for $144 million, AgustaWestland then made a $4.7 million payment to Mazza-controlled ORNGE Global. A later additional payment of $2 million was promised. Allegedly, the payment was for “marketing services”. It was found that this "consisted of a small binder of information pulled together by Long."[18] Subsequent Ornge leader Ron McKerlie said the two small binders do not justify the large payment. The binders are said to be in the possession of the OPP.[19]

Later, a former executive indicated that Ornge had paid AgustaWestland $7 million more than should have. It was this allegation that prompted the OPP investigation.[18] Tom Rothfels indicated that Mazza insisted on paying about $600,000 extra per helicopter (roughly $7 million).[20] Rick Potter, former COO, indicated about $10 million extra.[20]

AgustaWestand also agreed to donate $2.9 million US to Ornge's charitable foundation.[21]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ornge
 

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Drones would be far more suitable for search and rescue and wildfire operations than medical evacuations. I would never trust an autonomous machine with any living organism, for reasons that go beyond my familiarity with multiple staples of science fiction. Without a level of face-to-face interaction, the individual being evacuated is certainly not going to be as comfortable trusting instructions.
 

Good2Golf

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Xylric said:
Drones would be far more suitable for search and rescue and wildfire operations than medical evacuations. I would never trust an autonomous machine with any living organism, for reasons that go beyond my familiarity with multiple staples of science fiction. Without a level of face-to-face interaction, the individual being evacuated is certainly not going to be as comfortable trusting instructions.

So you don’t take terrestrial drones (aka driverless shuttle trains) between terminals at most major airports? 
 

mariomike

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I don't even trust elevators without operators. Joking (  sort of )  :)
 

lenaitch

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Good2Golf said:
So you don’t take terrestrial drones (aka driverless shuttle trains) between terminals at most major airports?

They're not trying to insert things in various openings or create new openings with sharp things as we bounce along.
 

Jarnhamar

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lenaitch said:
They're not trying to insert things in various openings or create new openings with sharp things as we bounce along.

A paramedic team could work on a patient, stabilize them and whisk them away to a hospital avoiding traffic, or, a paramedic could ride with the patient to the hospital.
 

mariomike

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Jarnhamar said:
A paramedic team could work on a patient, stabilize them and whisk them away to a hospital avoiding traffic, or, a paramedic could ride with the patient to the hospital.

Even back in 1965, when police cars were yellow, Toronto could have used them.

 

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Good2Golf

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lenaitch said:
They're not trying to insert things in various openings or create new openings with sharp things as we bounce along.

That wasn’t Xylric’s issue, I believe. It was generally trusting to travel in an unmanned machine, which millions do around the world on those unmanned shuttles.
 

lenaitch

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Good2Golf said:
That wasn’t Xylric’s issue, I believe. It was generally trusting to travel in an unmanned machine, which millions do around the world on those unmanned shuttles.

Ya, sorry, my mind went to not only autonomous piloting but robotic paramedics.
 
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