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Sexual Misconduct Allegations in The CAF

btrudy

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I think you missed the point entirely.

In the particular case that has been the topic of discussion lately, you seem to be quite happy to ignore the concerns raised regarding the investigation. I suspect you are quite happy ignoring the concerns for broadly the same reasons the MPs seem to have conducted themselves the way they did, wanting to see someone pay. i.e. "March the guilty bastard in"

You can't fix a broken system by breaking the system in a different way. If people don't trust that they will get a fair investigation into allegations, then the system has failed.

Simply put, no one here has convinced me that the concerns about the investigation are all that legitimate. I'm not a lawyer nor a police officer, but I was never under the impression that investigating officers are required to interview suspects. No one here has provided any evidence to the contrary.

Nor do the family's claims that these texts would be exonerating seem convincing. Certainly if said texts were released, I'd read 'em and might come to a different conclusion. But they haven't been, so I'm left basing my conclusions upon the evidence I do have available to me: the clearly articulated and credible sounding account that the victim in this case told to the media.

Guilty people proclaim their innocence all the time.
 

ModlrMike

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This case is why I don't believe that the MPs or CFNIS should have the power to lay charges. We should align with what is practice in the civilian arena where the Crown prosecutor's office decides.

To quote from Law & Order: In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: The police, who investigate crime, and the district attorneys, who prosecute the offenders.
 

btrudy

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This case is why I don't believe that the MPs or CFNIS should have the power to lay charges. We should align with what is practice in the civilian arena where the Crown prosecutor's office decides.

To quote from Law & Order: In the criminal justice system, the people are represented by two separate yet equally important groups: The police, who investigate crime, and the district attorneys, who prosecute the offenders.

Uhhh maybe don't get your info from Law and Order? That's a different country. Police can and do lay charges in Canada; e.g. "Regina Police Service lay charges to Sunday's Amber Alert abductor"
 

btrudy

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Drinking to blackout, with another person your cheating with in a hotel room, makes you credible??

Actually, let me touch upon this again.

In your mind, the fact that she was drinking heavily ruins her credibility. Let's follow this line of reasoning to its natural conclusion. Ergo, women who are drinking heavily can't have their testimony trusted. Ergo, it's open season to rape anyone who ever gets really drunk with you, because you know that you'll get away with it. As long as there's no other witnesses, perfect crime.

You do realize just how absolutely shitty of a stance it is that you're taking here, right?

Sometimes people who are sexually assaulted aren't perfect people. Sometimes the things they were doing aren't "respectable".

That doesn't mean they're not entitled to justice when they are victimized. It doesn't mean that it a woman passed out drunk should be viewed as a slab of meat to stick your dick in, because who's going to believe her?
 

Jarnhamar

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Drinking to blackout, with another person your cheating with in a hotel room, makes you credible??

I don't have an opinion either way who's telling the truth and who isn't.

This story seems like there is way more to it than what we're reading about.

Not letting the civilian accuser have a one on one meeting with the accused's military supervisor was still the right call.


Maybe the way forward is for the CAF to have some type of support liaison officer who can offer victims support services and resources. Similar to a Designated Assistant role.
Not that we could logistically accomplish that at this time. A civilian liaison person maybe ?
 

btrudy

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I don't have an opinion either way who's telling the truth and who isn't.

This story seems like there is way more to it than what we're reading about.

Not letting the civilian accuser have a one on one meeting with the accused's military supervisor was still the right call.


Maybe the way forward is for the CAF to have some type of support liaison officer who can offer victims support services and resources. Similar to a Designated Assistant role.
Not that we could logistically accomplish that at this time. A civilian liaison person maybe ?

Even civilians can request a Victim Liaison Officer (please note this system wasn't in place at the time), although I'm sure that 99.9% of them wouldn't be aware of that fact.
 

Kilted

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Society itself has to change.


Good luck
I remember the attitudes the other members of my BMQ had about women the day they showed up to BMQ many, many years ago. Let's just say that they weren't positive. New recruits now may be more afraid to say the same things out loud, but I'm sure many of them think the same way.
 

OldSolduer

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Seriously? What the fuck it is with you and the stupid "that's sexist" claim any time someone describes something that overwhelmingly happens to women?

51% of women report it having happened to them. Fifty one fucking percent.

Get your head out of your ass and try arguing in good faith for once.
Me thinks you doth protest too much. And I could tell you a few stories about being wrongfully accused but I sure it will fall on deaf ears.
 

Kilted

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Seriously? What the fuck it is with you and the stupid "that's sexist" claim any time someone describes something that overwhelmingly happens to women?

51% of women report it having happened to them. Fifty one fucking percent.

Get your head out of your ass and try arguing in good faith for once.
Not really sure as how that article is relevant to the discussion. The testimony of a drunk person will always be less credible than if they were sober.
 
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