• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

Peter MacKay Hired As Advisor At McInnes Cooper and Deloitte

daftandbarmy

Army.ca Myth
Reaction score
796
Points
910
I wonder how a former MND could be useful to a big legal/ consulting firm? :)  :sarcasm:



Peter MacKay Hired As Advisor At McInnes Cooper and Deloitte

HALIFAX — Fresh off an unsuccessful bid to become the next leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, Nova Scotia’s Peter MacKay has joined McInnes Cooper and Deloitte Canada as a strategic advisor.

The firms made the announcement in a joint press release on December 15.

At Deloitte, MacKay will advise on projects related to government and public service, focusing on “defense modernization, justice reform, infrastructure and economic development.”

McInnes Cooper says they will tap MacKay to “provide counsel to the firm’s clients related to his broad areas of expertise” around business and the public sector.

“Peter’s wealth of professional experience and public service, combined with his Atlantic Canadian roots and national and international background, provide McInnes Cooper with invaluable opportunities to support and partner with our clients in new and meaningful ways,” said Kevin Kiley, managing partner at McInnes Cooper.

MacKay’s new gigs come after his recent loss to Erin O’Tool for the leadership of the Conservative Party of Canada. The August leadership race was MacKay’s first return to politics since he chose not to run in the 2015 federal election.

The New Glasgow-born MacKay was first elected to the House of Commons, representing the Pictou-Antigonish-Guysborough riding, in 1997.

He was elected leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party in 2003, shortly before the party merged with Stephen Harper’s Canadian Alliance to form the Conservative Party of Canada.

During Harper’s time as Prime Minister, MacKay served in several high-profile cabinet positions, including Foreign Affairs and National Defense.

Prior to entering politics, MacKay worked as a lawyer. He studied Law at Dalhousie University and was called to the Nova Scotia Bar in June 1991, before working as a crown attorney through the bulk of the 1990s.

In today’s news release, MacKay said he was “thrilled by the opportunity to collaborate with two such diverse, well-regarded and talent-rich firms.”

“I look forward to applying my experience and expertise and collaborating with both teams to achieve successful results and to working on national files, while also helping Atlantic Canadian organizations and businesses thrive,” he said.

https://huddle.today/peter-mackay-hired-as-advisor-at-mcinnes-cooper-and-deloitte/?fbclid=IwAR1yxyEwFjjlFjp9fxTZw0goAQVqZvQMF6cMAZViy1HQp_8K1ynZ5WfClDc
 

dapaterson

Army.ca Myth
Donor
Reaction score
490
Points
830
Credit where credit is due - at least he didn't beg for a waiver to be able to pimp himself out as soon as he left Parliament.
 

Navy_Pete

Army.ca Veteran
Subscriber
Reaction score
201
Points
680
A couple of years ago I did a marine contracting course (which happened to be run by a few M&C consultants); it was excellent. Both were lawyers with significant practical international experience in complex marine projects (generally after they went bad). Have done a few other courses where retired GoC mandarins gave some lectures, and it was really useful to hear from behind the curtain. Can see similar types of things if you could hear from a former MND for general high level policy kind of things.

Normally you get tasked with doing up briefings for ADMs and up with nothing more than a template for the format and a general description of the goal. Sure it gets vetted as it goes up, but personally wouldn't have minded some anecdotes of what they were looking for from a former Big Giant Head ahead of time before I got tasked. It's not the people that are dealing with the BGHs and understand what they look for that put together the info after all; it's the staffers that are too far down the chain to be in the meetings that know the details. It's a big challenge to put together stuff that gets fired into a void, and very rarely get direct and useful feedback (in my personal experience).
 
Top