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Pay Raise 2021

coolintheshade

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Hi all.....I guess this is finally happening. Good timing with Tax time and relocations. Pls find attached an xls script to help you calculate how much you can expect.

Cheers
 

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  • 2021-back-pay-calculator (blank).zip
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Dhillongs

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does anyone know if this applies to released veterans currently receiving ELB since the announced date?
 

brihard

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does anyone know if this applies to released veterans currently receiving ELB since the announced date?

If you released after the raise takes effect, then ELB/IRB should adjust to the new pay rate effective when you released, yes. If you released prior to the first day of the raise, then no.
 

Dhillongs

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If you released after the raise takes effect, then ELB/IRB should adjust to the new pay rate effective when you released, yes. If you released prior to the first day of the raise, then no.
thank you for clearing that up
 

Kilted

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Is there anyway that this could have been given on a separate pay so that it did not cause everyone to be taxed at a significantly higher level?
 

ModlrMike

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Unfortunately, no. Income is taxed in the year in which it is paid, not necessarily earned. This is why people need to be very careful about choosing a retirement date when there are payments due.
 

ballz

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Is there anyway that this could have been given on a separate pay so that it did not cause everyone to be taxed at a significantly higher level?

No but they could have actually calculated the proper source deductions instead of just deducting it at the highest tax rate for everyone which is what appears to have happened.

In any case, take solace in the fact that it doesn't matter. Your tax bill is calculated on Dec 31st based on all of your income for the year. If they over-deducted at source (which appears to have happened here, definitely did to me) then you'll get the rest back when you do your taxes.
 

Weinie

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No but they could have actually calculated the proper source deductions instead of just deducting it at the highest tax rate for everyone which is what appears to have happened.

In any case, take solace in the fact that it doesn't matter. Your tax bill is calculated on Dec 31st based on all of your income for the year. If they over-deducted at source (which appears to have happened here, definitely did to me) then you'll get the rest back when you do your taxes.
Yup, except that I and others could have taken that 20% of over taxation and invested it for 9 months. So, double loss.
 

ballz

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Deductions made by software systems have to comply with CRA standards, which get wonky when there are one-time spikes in pay.

If you wish to dig into how it's calculated, the policy document is online at:


While I knew source deductions had to comply with CRA requirements, I didn't realize the method for lump-sum payments was so... overly simplistic (chalk it up to no experience doing payroll).

I'm surprised to find myself accusing CRA of approaching something too simply, but yes, they basically treat it like you're going to get that lumpsum payment every month for the entire year, in effect source deducting you at the highest marginal rates. So even if you make $30k a year, if you get a $10k lump sum it gets taxed as if you make $120k a year. That method disadvantages people as @Weinie has pointed out, or if they just needed the extra money for something (anything... it's their money).

In any case, I'm always happy to learn something new.
 

Navy_Pete

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While I knew source deductions had to comply with CRA requirements, I didn't realize the method for lump-sum payments was so... overly simplistic (chalk it up to no experience doing payroll).

I'm surprised to find myself accusing CRA of approaching something too simply, but yes, they basically treat it like you're going to get that lumpsum payment every month for the entire year, in effect source deducting you at the highest marginal rates. So even if you make $30k a year, if you get a $10k lump sum it gets taxed as if you make $120k a year. That method disadvantages people as @Weinie has pointed out, or if they just needed the extra money for something (anything... it's their money).

In any case, I'm always happy to learn something new.
There is a form you can fill in to request a change in deductions (ie if you live in Ontario but work in QC, to be taxed at the ON rate), but not sure if you can do it for a one time thing like this.

This is why I prefer it when it comes in November/December, so you can get it back quickly, but not going to complain about getting a backpay (that I had no idea was coming until the message came out) when I feel pretty lucky to have a steady job.
 

Milhouser911

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Any updates on how this affects folks on retired folks, or those on a VAC voc rehab program? I received the actual lump sum for the time I was serving, but I haven't seen my pension amount or ELB updated yet.

Scott
 

CountDC

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doesn't that happen in Jan of each year? Maybe misread something.

Wonder why they label this as 2021 pay increase when it only went to 2020? Can't wait to see what we get in 2025.
 
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