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New to the site, question about recruiting?

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Hello all,

I apologize if I got this in the wrong section. I am 16 years old and looking to join the Army when I'm out of high school. I've tried for the reserves (they are full) and I just got back from an interview with a Lieutenant for the school Co-op program they offer but I'm afraid due to my nerves I bombed the interview  :(. Anyway, I have a quick question that I failed to ask the man who was interviewing me, and maybe someone here could help?

I am looking to just join the regular army force after high school because it seems all other options are unavailable. My question is should I apply half way through my last year of high school to the army? So when I am done high school is saves me some time of waiting? How long is the wait for recruitment? I am looking to get into the Infantry.

Thanks everyone  :cdn:

 

Romanmaz

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Marshall12345 said:
Hello all,

I apologize if I got this in the wrong section. I am 16 years old and looking to join the Army when I'm out of high school. I've tried for the reserves (they are full) and I just got back from an interview with a Lieutenant for the school Co-op program they offer but I'm afraid due to my nerves I bombed the interview  :(. Anyway, I have a quick question that I failed to ask the man who was interviewing me, and maybe someone here could help?

I am looking to just join the regular army force after high school because it seems all other options are unavailable. My question is should I apply half way through my last year of high school to the army? So when I am done high school is saves me some time of waiting? How long is the wait for recruitment? I am looking to get into the Infantry.

Thanks everyone  :cdn:
No offense, but if you don't have the nerves to handle a fairly informal interview for Co-op, you won't do very well applying for regular force, especially for something as competitive as infantry. As to your question about the wait time, it varies greatly with every applicant depending on numerous factors.
 

jwtg

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Romanmaz said:
No offense, but if you don't have the nerves to handle a fairly informal interview for Co-op, you won't do very well applying for regular force, especially for something as competitive as infantry. As to your question about the wait time, it varies greatly with every applicant depending on numerous factors.

He's also 16. For all we know, this could have been his 1st or 1000th job interview.  Nerves are probably OK at this point in his life.

To the OP- confidence and comfort in an interview situation will come with time and the development of your own self-confidence.  Remember what you did poorly this time around, and also remember what you did well.  If/when you do a reg force interview, do more of what you did well and less of what you did poorly.

Best of luck.
 

Silverfire

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There is no standard amount of time for recruiting, some get through it in a few months, others a few years.  Apply as early as possible, I applied the January of my senior year.  My CFRC asked me when I could start and I told them end of June/July.  You can do the same thing.
 
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Romanmaz said:
No offense, but if you don't have the nerves to handle a fairly informal interview for Co-op, you won't do very well applying for regular force, especially for something as competitive as infantry. As to your question about the wait time, it varies greatly with every applicant depending on numerous factors.

Thanks for the reply. No offense taken, my nerves were due to the fact that it is a competetive program and I live 45 minutes from it so I would really have to make a good impression to be considered. It was not that bad of an interview but I know I could do better. How was your time joining the army? Was it a lengthy process? I've read online that it can be a pain to get into.
 
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jwtg said:
He's also 16. For all we know, this could have been his 1st or 1000th job interview.  Nerves are probably OK at this point in his life.

To the OP- confidence and comfort in an interview situation will come with time and the development of your own self-confidence.  Remember what you did poorly this time around, and also remember what you did well.  If/when you do a reg force interview, do more of what you did well and less of what you did poorly.

Best of luck.


Thanks for the reply. I .ave had interview in the past with no problems but the army base and the Lieutenant (although a very nice man) threw me off a little bit. By no means was it a terrible interview, I just know I could have done better, How was your time joining the military? Was it a lengthy process?
 

Tollis

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Nerves aren't a bad thing as you get older you become more confident.  I've only had 5 interviews in my life including my most recent CF interview.  During my first at a local grocery store I was shaking slightly and could barely talk, during my interview for the CF I was perfectly calm and was chatting and laughing with the sergeant doing the interview.  Have confidence in yourself and your abilitys it will go along way.  The wait time for recruiting varies greatly some people get through the process in 2 months others take 2 years.

However if you planning on joining the CF because "all other options are unavailable" you should do some serious thinking.  If your joining for that reason only you likely won't make it to far.  In my opinion NO options are unavailable at 16 you just need motivation and you CAN do anything.  If you do decide that you really want to join the CF then I wish you the best of luck
 

kawa11

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Marshall12345 said:
Thanks for the reply. I .ave had interview in the past with no problems but the army base and the Lieutenant (although a very nice man) threw me off a little bit. By no means was it a terrible interview, I just know I could have done better, How was your time joining the military? Was it a lengthy process?
http://jobsearch.about.com/od/interviewquestionsanswers/a/interviewquest.htm
^Most of this stuff won't apply to you - unless of course you attend corporate head hunting sessions in your spare time.

However, a lot of these questions will pop up over and over.
I like to read sites like these just to refresh my mind or give a quicker answer the next day. Saves me the embarrassment of sitting there with my jaw open saying nothing or being caught off guard by simple questions.

At 16, interviews can be nerve racking. Even for simple things like McDonald's.
Just remember that a job interview is as much an opportunity for you to present yourself/qualities to them as it is for them to present aspects of their employment that will be attractive to you..
 

Nauticus

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Marshall12345 said:
Hello all,

I apologize if I got this in the wrong section. I am 16 years old and looking to join the Army when I'm out of high school. I've tried for the reserves (they are full) and I just got back from an interview with a Lieutenant for the school Co-op program they offer but I'm afraid due to my nerves I bombed the interview  :(. Anyway, I have a quick question that I failed to ask the man who was interviewing me, and maybe someone here could help?

I am looking to just join the regular army force after high school because it seems all other options are unavailable. My question is should I apply half way through my last year of high school to the army? So when I am done high school is saves me some time of waiting? How long is the wait for recruitment? I am looking to get into the Infantry.

Thanks everyone  :cdn:
There's no guarantees in any aspect of the application. Nobody can guess how long it would take, nobody knows if they will be hiring infantry that year, and nobody knows how competitive it might be.
 

TTopp

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Because your 16 and have a year or so to finish school the bigger question is will infantry be open. some sort of combat arms usually are but you never know. Also like Romanmaz said it is very competitive. Keep your options open and good luck man.
 

canada94

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Romanmaz said:
No offense, but if you don't have the nerves to handle a fairly informal interview for Co-op, you won't do very well applying for regular force, especially for something as competitive as infantry. As to your question about the wait time, it varies greatly with every applicant depending on numerous factors.

Disagree. Nerves usually show you either have something to hide, or that you care; and by care I mean it must mean a lot.

- Mike

All my opinion.

PS: If you are in your senior of high school, apply in September as the process alone is a very long process.
 

Nauticus

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canada94 said:
Disagree. Nerves usually show you either have something to hide, or that you care; and by care I mean it must mean a lot.

- Mike

All my opinion.

PS: If you are in your senior of high school, apply in September as the process alone is a very long process.
I've found that nerves can also show that the person may lack confidence.
 

Romanmaz

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Nauticus said:
I've found that nerves can also show that the person may lack confidence.
Bingo.
During a job interview, irregardless of the specific profession, you must exude confidence to be able to portray what you have to offer and why you are the best candidate for the job. It is extremely hard to do that if you are not confident in yourself and/or don't believe the words that are coming out of you're mouth.

Disagree. Nerves usually show you either have something to hide, or that you care; and by care I mean it must mean a lot.

I care. Alote, actually. It's not about what you think or feel, its about what you can convey to the interviewer, if you come of like a weirdo it won't make a difference how much you "care".  :2c:

I think it's time for me to go to sleep......
 

Scott

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Romanmaz said:
Bingo.
During a job interview, irregardless of the specific profession, you must exude confidence to be able to portray what you have to offer and why you are the best candidate for the job. It is extremely hard to do that if you are not confident in yourself and/or don't believe the words that are coming out of you're mouth.

Disagree. One can show some level of confidence even if they are nervous. That's why good interviewers have the skills necessary to help put a candidate's mind at ease. Trust me, overconfidence is MUCH easier to get yourself into than nervousness is to get out of.

I care. Alote, actually. It's not about what you think or feel, its about what you can convey to the interviewer, if you come of like a weirdo it won't make a difference how much you "care".  :2c:

I think it's time for me to go to sleep......

Conveying BS to a trained interviewer will land you nothing but a PFO letter. And it should. I've interviewed a few people for jobs and I always start by doing my best to make them feel welcome and comfortable. It is not a cross examination. If they can't take something from what I tell them, as well as my non-verbal cues, then they are going to suffer. However, if they can understand that they are in the room because I (we) have seen something I (we) like then that should give them a confidence boost in itself - and hopefully they cultivate that into a feeling of comfort.

To the OP. If you have an interview then you've done well. Now sit back and relax. Prepare yourself for the interview like you would any other. Get a good night's sleep. Eat a good meal beforehand. For God's sake, be honest. You wouldn't be the first candidate to tell an interviewer that you're nervous.

Good luck
 

canada94

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Nauticus said:
I've found that nerves can also show that the person may lack confidence.

Yes true I do agree you are correct.. never looked at it that way :).
 

Romanmaz

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Scott said:
Disagree. One can show some level of confidence even if they are nervous. That's why good interviewers have the skills necessary to help put a candidate's mind at ease. Trust me, overconfidence is MUCH easier to get yourself into than nervousness is to get out of.

Conveying BS to a trained interviewer will land you nothing but a PFO letter. And it should. I've interviewed a few people for jobs and I always start by doing my best to make them feel welcome and comfortable. It is not a cross examination. If they can't take something from what I tell them, as well as my non-verbal cues, then they are going to suffer. However, if they can understand that they are in the room because I (we) have seen something I (we) like then that should give them a confidence boost in itself - and hopefully they cultivate that into a feeling of comfort.

To the OP. If you have an interview then you've done well. Now sit back and relax. Prepare yourself for the interview like you would any other. Get a good night's sleep. Eat a good meal beforehand. For God's sake, be honest. You wouldn't be the first candidate to tell an interviewer that you're nervous.

Good luck
I completely agree. Didn't mean to imply that you should BS then interviewer if that's how it was taken.
 
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