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New Dress Regs 🤣

Quirky

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One take:

Reflecting on our Forces’ new, hyper-casual uniform policy, one might see it as a naïve attempt to conjure interest among radical millennial fringe lifestyles that never have, and likely never will, consider the Forces a career. Or, maybe letting some non-binary male military police sergeant or armored soldier wear a female skirt with their newly long pink hair and prominent face tattoo (yes, all that is possible now) is an attempt to weed out more professionally conservative members of the Forces.
But, maybe I am all wrong and the military’s new casual, self-customizable look is the way of the future. Perhaps I was just brainwashed by the old Cold War army ethos of the 1980s into thinking that drill, dress and deportment were fundamental to a military’s image, cohesion and morale. So maybe once the new hyper-casual dress code comes into effect this September, millennials will actually be lining up in droves to enlist, serve and fight?

Not sure what this has to do with Trudeau, but that would make more sense vise an internally driven change.

Either way I agree with the crusty old Int officer regarding the professional appearance part. I don't think Canadians will care all that much anyway, which is on par for their feelings towards the CAF.
 

Baloo

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And conversely to prove, yet again, that every generation of soldiers endures being seen as 'softer' than the last:

How muscle cars, sideburns and John Travolta helped save the military after Vietnam

In a 1971 article in Soldier magazine, Spc. Mike Speegle, an unofficial spokesman for the new, relaxed Army was described talking to students at a West Virginia high school about his barracks.

“It was pretty nice, and as long as it was neat they didn’t care what you had in it. I had black light posters, peace signs, a little styrofoam beer cooler in the corner,” said Speegle.

The tag lines for the “Today’s Army Wants to Join You” campaign included phrases such as “We care more about what you think, than how you cut your hair” and “When was the last time you got promoted?” It also promised that you could “Take the Army’s 16 month tour of Europe.”
 

Baloo

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So maybe once the new hyper-casual dress code comes into effect this September, millennials will actually be lining up in droves to enlist, serve and fight?

I assume that the generation to whom the author disparagingly refers, is that same one that has served this nation across the globe in multiple active theatres over the past two decades, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Mali, Ukraine and Latvia.
 

rmc_wannabe

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I assume that the generation to whom the author disparagingly refers, is that same one that has served this nation across the globe in multiple active theatres over the past two decades, including Afghanistan, Iraq, Mali, Ukraine and Latvia.
The eldest millenials are 42. The last of that cohort is 27. A lot of the Cpl/Ptes on the ground in 2006 in Kandahar were millenials and we did a bang up job all things considered.

Its Gen Z you're after, and truth be told, they're the hardest generation to sell anything to because of how critically they think. A generation that has had the wealth of human knowledge and opinion at their finger tips theor entire life is not going to take what you're selling at face value.

With that, they have grown up in one of the most tolerant and socially liberal periods in history. They are probably the most "woke" because it's socially unacceptable in their peer group to be sexist, racist, homophobic, etc.

So while this is something we all want to put on Millenials, it's not us. We've been on the whipping post for long enough. Gen Z, your turn.
 

Halifax Tar

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The eldest millenials are 42. The last of that cohort is 27. A lot of the Cpl/Ptes on the ground in 2006 in Kandahar were millenials and we did a bang up job all things considered.

Its Gen Z you're after, and truth be told, they're the hardest generation to sell anything to because of how critically they think. A generation that has had the wealth of human knowledge and opinion at their finger tips theor entire life is not going to take what you're selling at face value.

With that, they have grown up in one of the most tolerant and socially liberal periods in history. They are probably the most "woke" because it's socially unacceptable in their peer group to be sexist, racist, homophobic, etc.

So while this is something we all want to put on Millenials, it's not us. We've been on the whipping post for long enough. Gen Z, your turn.

Us Gen Xers seem to have escaped this whole generational consternation lol
 

AKa

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Gen X gets to roll our eyes at all of them.

Once all the pearl clutching is done and we get on with the new dress regs, I expect we won't see that much change. People who hate uniforms and uniformity tend not to join the military. The intersection of those who want wildly coloured hair/facial tattoos, etc and people who decide to join the CAF will be quite small. I'll be interested to see how many avail themselves of the more controversial expressions of style.

I'm a dinosaur and I don't much fuss over these details. I do rather miss consistently seeing crisp, tidy uniforms that somewhat fit (as much as uniforms ever fit) and footwear that isn't grey with dust.
 

Brad Sallows

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A generation that has had the wealth of human knowledge and opinion at their finger tips theor entire life is not going to take what you're selling at face value.

Assuming they paid any attention. Older generations do not have a monopoly on self-assurance and belief that they are on the right side of history, or confidence in knowing things that just aren't so.
 

Pieman

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I'm wondering if troops will start creating their own dress and deportment looks within the regiments. The new regulations seem to allow a great deal of variations which allows for creating cliques. For example, you are now in 12 Troop. We wear our hair like so, our beards are trimmed like so, we have a red streak in our hair on the right side. etc. etc. You dress different then you are not a team player. Anyone seeing that kind of thing happen? I suspect this may happen as a way of creating uniformity at a smaller level which might contribute to creating a more effective sense of belonging/loyalty to a troop. The older regulations would not allow for that kind of individalization within the ranks. If it becomes true then there are positive and negative attributes to creating cliques. The negative part being cliques possibly creating hazing ritutals as they create their own group identities. Oh boy, anyone else see how this could spin out of control?
 
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Jarnhamar

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I'm wondering if troops will start creating their own dress and deportment looks within the regiments. The new regulations seem to allow a great deal of variations which allows for creating cliques. For example, you are now in 12 Troop. We wear our hair like so, our beards are trimmed like so, we have a red streak in our hair on the right side. etc. etc. You dress different then you are not a team player. Anyone seeing that kind of thing happen? I suspect this may happen as a way of creating uniformity at a smaller level which might contribute to creating a more effective sense of belonging/loyalty to a troop. The older regulations would not allow for that kind of individalization within the ranks. If it becomes true then there are positive and negative attributes to creating cliques. The negative part being cliques possibly creating hazing ritutals as they create their own group identities. Oh boy, anyone else see how this could spin out of control?

Like gang colours in the US military. Good question.

Out of curiosity I googled stormfront colours and this popped up

stormfront-aya-cash-the-boys-1596556459.jpg
 

OldSolduer

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Yes, young men will naturally band together under a banner for group security and identity. I always thought that was why the Army gave you an identity and strict uniform dress as a way of preventing these kinds of subgroups forming. :unsure:
Even within the tribe there are clan distinctions. Same with the Army and its Corps and Regiments
 

Pieman

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Even within the tribe there are clan distinctions. Same with the Army and its Corps and Regiments
They are very subtle in comparison to what can happen now. It's psycolgically significant to wear a group identifier such as regimental uniform. Now that uniform can be easily split into sub group identities (cliques) with the new dress regulations. I'm not saying it's a bad thing, but I do think it carries some concequences and potential risks that the CoC will have to deal with.
 

Eye In The Sky

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I'm wondering if troops will start creating their own dress and deportment looks within the regiments. The new regulations seem to allow a great deal of variations which allows for creating cliques. For example, you are now in 12 Troop. We wear our hair like so, our beards are trimmed like so, we have a red streak in our hair on the right side. etc. etc. You dress different then you are not a team player. Anyone seeing that kind of thing happen? I suspect this may happen as a way of creating uniformity at a smaller level which might contribute to creating a more effective sense of belonging/loyalty to a troop. The older regulations would not allow for that kind of individalization within the ranks. If it becomes true then there are positive and negative attributes to creating cliques. The negative part being cliques possibly creating hazing ritutals as they create their own group identities. Oh boy, anyone else see how this could spin out of control?

If the Sgts, WOs and Officers are doing their job it’s a non-threat anymore than it is now.
 

Pieman

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If the Sgts, WOs and Officers are doing their job it’s a non-threat anymore than it is now.
Would they? How would they deal with a situation of a clique forming within a Troop? Is it encouraged or discouraged? What are the signs that they look for indicating the clique is getting out of control?
 

OldSolduer

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Would they? How would they deal with a situation of a clique forming within a Troop? Is it encouraged or discouraged? What are the signs that they look for indicating the clique is getting out of control?
Its rather easy. The RSM and the CSMs see its forming with possible negative consequences. On unit reorg "Bloggins to A Coy, Smiff to B Coy and Herby to C Coy" . After dismissal they can still socialize however with different schedules its not a given.
 

Eye In The Sky

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Would they? How would they deal with a situation of a clique forming within a Troop? Is it encouraged or discouraged? What are the signs that they look for indicating the clique is getting out of control?

Sure they would; it’s their troop, and they way you describe it the red streak would be rather easy to see.

Small cliques have been happening forever and aren’t necessarily a bad thing. I am far more loyal to my crew than I am the Comd RCAF or some other senior RCAF mbr. Why wouldn’t I be? They are the ones who are going to pull my fat ass out of the aircraft if we ditch and are sinking. Comd RCAF will be on the news reading a script approved by a PAO or PMO staffer.

Bad cliques are different of course and I don’t think they will suddenly become a problem based on personal grooming relaxations.
 
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