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Help with a picture

Edward Campbell

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Can anyone help me with a bit more info about the attached picture.

What I found on my own, my Google-fu is not strong, says: "Soldiers of a Scottish Canadian regiment move up to the start line for the 2nd Battle of Cambrai 1918. Wire-cutters are fitted to the muzzles of their rifles."

Can anyone provide more information, please? I'm just curious, I saw the image on a friends social media feed and I assumed from the shape of the Div patch, that they were Canadians and, from the kilts, that it was 1914-18, but ...
 

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expwor

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E.R. Campbell said:
Can anyone help me with a bit more info about the attached picture.

What I found on my own, my Google-fu is not strong, says: "Soldiers of a Scottish Canadian regiment move up to the start line for the 2nd Battle of Cambrai 1918. Wire-cutters are fitted to the muzzles of their rifles."

Can anyone provide more information, please? I'm just curious, I saw the image on a friends social media feed and I assumed from the shape of the Div patch, that they were Canadians and, from the kilts, that it was 1914-18, but ...

Well hopefully my Google-fu is helpful.  Actually using tineye.com I came up with this link
http://www.xmarksthescot.com/forum/f105/canadas-highland-regiments-59614/index5.html
Scroll down to BoldHighlander's post on that site and he says it is 42nd Highlanders of Canada at Canal du Nord 1918
Hope that helps

Tom
 

Blackadder1916

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While it doesn't identify the regiment, a somewhat expanded view with a (possibly contemporary) caption found on The Regimental Rogue.

1918_canadian_highlanders_cambrai_crop_rd700px.jpg


(Edited to add)

The photograph in question is available at Library and Archives Canada titled
"Personnel of the 42nd Regiment (Royal Highlanders of Canada) moving up to the attack on Cambrai in the early morning".
 

Chispa

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Blackadder1916 said:
While it doesn't identify the regiment, a somewhat expanded view with a (possibly contemporary) caption found on The Regimental Rogue.

1918_canadian_highlanders_cambrai_crop_rd700px.jpg


P.S. Sorry to Blackadder didn't notice your links and have LAC's pic on file.

That's CEF 42nd BATT., see shoulder patch.

42nd_Bn_CEF.jpg




See helmet etc.

a003265-v8.jpg

Oct. 1918: Personnel of the 42nd Regiment (Royal Highlanders of Canada) moving up to the attack on Cambrai in the early morning.
The soldier third from right is R.E. Henley of "B" Company, 42nd Regiment. Copy negative PA-003265.

C.U.

Joseph
 

Edward Campbell

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So, 42nd Highlanders, more properly, the 42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), CEF, was, according to my search "authorized on 7 November 1914 and embarked for Great Britain on 10 June 1915, disembarking in France on 9 October 1915, where it fought as part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war." In other words, The Black Watch, right?
 

Michael OLeary

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The Formation of the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade; CEF
http://regimentalrogue.tripod.com/blog/index.blog/2308099/the-formation-of-the-7th-canadian-infantry-brigade-cef/

Extracts from the opening pages of the War Dairy of the 7th Canadian Infantry Brigade.

42ND BATTALION, (5TH ROYAL HIGHLANDERS OF CANADA).

42nd Battalion (5th Royal Highlanders of Canada) Canadian Expeditionary Forces (Lieut Colonel G.C. Cantlie) joined the Brigade on its formation at Mont-des-Cats, having been for a period of nearly three months on Active Service in France. Recruited and mobilized in the City of Montreal, Province of Quebec in February 1915, and after five months training in Canada sailed for England, where further training in musketry was undergone until the 9th October 1915 when the Battalion came over to France.

The 42nd Canadian Infantry Battalion is now perpetuated by The Black Watch of Canada (Royal Highland Regiment).
 

expwor

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E.R. Campbell said:
So, 42nd Highlanders, more properly, the 42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), CEF, was, according to my search "authorized on 7 November 1914 and embarked for Great Britain on 10 June 1915, disembarking in France on 9 October 1915, where it fought as part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war." In other words, The Black Watch, right?

From The Black Watch's website http://www.blackwatchcanada.com/
Their lineage
http://www.blackwatchcanada.com/en/heritage-and-history/lineage-chart
In short...Yes

Tom
 

Michael OLeary

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And here's the SMLE wire cutter:

http://www.historicalfirearms.info/post/54458499203/smle-wire-cutter-hundreds-of-thousands-of-miles

In 1916 the British Army developed a device that would allow individual soldier to cut the wire themselves.  The device could be attached using a loop and wingnut to the muzzle of the standard issue Short Magazine Lee-Enfield service rifle just behind the front sight.  The cutter was made of stamped steel by Decimals Ltd. of Selly Oak near Birmingham, the example seen above is a No1 MkII pattern made in 1917.

The design itself was ingenious: the soldier would feed the wire into the device and then use his rifle as leverage to cut it.  However, this proved extremely impractical in the field, with up to 20m of wire to breach the average soldier cutting his own path was an easy target.  They were quickly abandoned and with steel being in short supply many were melted down and put to better use.

https://www.google.ca/search?q=SMLE+wire+cutter&espv=2&biw=1289&bih=918&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiS9Mqd_5jMAhXnsYMKHVdUA0EQsAQIGg
 

exspy

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Pardon me, but weren't kilts and hose completely replaced with trousers when in the field by this point of the war?  Or am I completely mistaken?  Again?

Cheers,
Dan.

a003265-v8.jpg

Copy negative PA-003265.
 

mariomike

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Dan M said:
Pardon me, but weren't kilts and hose completely replaced with trousers when in the field by this point of the war? 

I saw this, for what it is worth,

geo said:
Highlanders did wear their kilts through the trench warfare of WW1.
I have photos of Cdn Highlanders going over the top in 17/18 wearing their kilts...... Highalnd heavy Brigades in the CEF
I am positive the Impreial highland regiments wore them as well.  Though I would have to research to validate....

Danjanou said:
Imperial and Canadian Highlanders did wear Kilts as part of their normal battle uniform in World War 1.
 

Chispa

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13th and 42nd mainly wore kilts, some officers wore trousers, and other personal of the Battalions during the war, the fighting force even in winter wore kilts.

Conlan_42ndBn.jpg



A/Major Charles Blair Wilson MID 'B' Company 42nd Battalion Royal Highlanders Of Canada CEF.

http://www.cefresearch.ca/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=7343&view=next


Joseph
 

Chispa

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E.R. Campbell said:
So, 42nd Highlanders, more properly, the 42nd Battalion (Royal Highlanders of Canada), CEF, was, according to my search "authorized on 7 November 1914 and embarked for Great Britain on 10 June 1915, disembarking in France on 9 October 1915, where it fought as part of the 7th Infantry Brigade, 3rd Canadian Division in France and Flanders until the end of the war." In other words, The Black Watch, right?

S.V.P. I’m just adding my opinion: Second Contingent CEF 42 Inf. BATT., was not the Black Watch or any connection to 5th Regt RHC in those times,
raised in “4th Divisional Area,” not forgetting the “legal Attested” matter; the lines indicated in Expeditionary Force War Establishments, 1914 (pp. 121-126).
Considering it took the Otter Committee, decades of grief, “come hell or high water,” establishing a connection, only unfolded in 1st Jan 1930 renamed BW RHC.
Unlike “Mother’s” first offspring, 13th BATT which was a fusion of “4 parent regiments,” I believe, however haven’t looked for the documentation, the 42nd only consisted
of one “Parent Regiment,” while the enrollment office was at 5th Regt RHC Armoury O.R., they came from far and wide, even Americans enlisted.

S.V.P. I know the status quo for 13th consisted at first of one, (see CEFresearch) then it was uncovered 3 parent regiments contributed at VC 1914.
I haven't published the paper on my blog yet and yes have evidence supporting my comment, will be revealed when posted.

Just my thoughts.

Joseph
 
J

jollyjacktar

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There was a veteran of the 42nd whom was a friend of the family when I was a young teen.  He told my Dad that their unit was quite popular with ladies when they were boarding the trains heading for the channel.  The Highlanders liked to dive on through windows etc, which caused many a kilt to go northwards and give a free show, much to the delight of all (officers and Snr NCO excepted).  A bit of an animal show, apparently.  ;D 
 
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