• Thanks for stopping by. Logging in to a registered account will remove all generic ads. Please reach out with any questions or concerns.

GoPro Cameras

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
290
Points
980
Right, I am in the market for a GoPro and wanted to put it out to the masses to see what feedback I can get on what I think I have learned.

I am pretty sure that the 3+ is what I am going to go with. Newer technology, from what I can tell, but not the flashiest of what's available.

I am keen to learn what users have experienced with recording duration for a 32 vs 64 GB SD card.

Curious about accessories you find as a must have and why.

What's the battery life like and how's the charging system work?

How do you find the app for iPhone works with the unit? I am keen on this feature for reviewing shots/video, and to control it remotely when we have it dash mounted or whatever. More compatibility works for me.

How do you find the editing software they offer for download? Tell me some cool features you've found with it.

We're going to use this on an eastern Europe trip. I'll take it snowshoeing, skiing, canoeing, kayaking, etc. And I am sure, like all new technologies, I'll find more uses. I already saw a dude attach his to the chainsaw - I can do that!

Thanks in advance for sharing.
 
J

jollyjacktar

Guest
I ran into the GoPro while on safari last spring in Africa.  There were several couples who had one and they were taking lots of amazing shots with it. 

From what I gather, the Europeans mostly had small Pelican type cases to carry it all in and keep it safe.  They swore by them. 

Also the yellow handle you can attach the camera on is a good item.  It floats and will keep your camera within reach if it goes in water.  For shooting with it the man explained that if he held the back of the camera against his lips he could pan back a Tnd forth and get good results. 

I also was shown a video by our guide, Fred, which was taken by a German teen earlier that year.  The kid had put his camera down and it was picked up in the mouth of a lioness.  She ran with it for some time in her mouth before dropping it.  The lens was pointed upwards and you could see her eye looking here and there and changing focus as the distances changed.  Pretty cool.  The camera survived just fine as well. 

I plan to get myself one for the next trip back to Africa.  I want to have a 64 card, spare batteries, some suction mounts for vehicle tops and the float handle as well just for a start.  When I was in Chobe National Park in Botswana I watched a pack of Wild Dogs trying to hunt some Wildebeest.  There was tons of action (sights and sounds) that I wish I had the camera to catch it on.  Next time, next time...
 

dapaterson

Army.ca Relic
Subscriber
Donor
Reaction score
8,008
Points
1,090
jollyjacktar said:
I watched a pack of Wild Dogs trying to hunt some Wildebeest.  There was tons of action (sights and sounds) that I wish I had the camera to catch it on.  Next time, next time...

Sounds like just about any night in many bars close to most bases...
 
J

jollyjacktar

Guest
At least with the chasing and grunting noises.  ;D
 

Coty4th

Guest
Reaction score
0
Points
60
I have owned the go pro hero I believe. the only problem i had with it was the interface seeing as the display was smaller then a dime and you only had two buttons. but with the 3 i see that has been fix dramatically. I have done mostly time lapes with it, the batter has lasted at least 2 hrs every full charge use at 1 pic every 3 sec and have never filled my 32g class (10) card. i have had the cold as an issue for batter life but only when it was sitting and not in use. to charge my go pro it was a usb. 

best thing i have owned for accessories was an adapter for the bottom of the camera so it will fit stander camera tripods and products. i say this because i have used other cameras before the go pro and had a lot of equipment with the stander screw fitting.   
 

Pusser

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1
Points
430
You may want to consider looking at the Garmin VIRB or VIRB Elite.  I've only had mine for about two weeks and I haven't had a chance to really try it out yet.  However, I bought it based on a review in Cycling Active (a UK magazine) comparing it to the GoPro.  For my purposes (recording images of drivers trying to kill me on my bicycle on crazy-assed hidde-curved, narrow, pothole-ridden English roads), it seemed the best choice.  I like the fact that it's more streamlined (i.e. torpedo shaped) than the GoPro and that it has a comparatively large viewscreen on it.  You can also take still photos at the push of a button while it's also recording video.  From what I've noticed so far, it's video and still photos are exceptionally clear (to the point that I can easily read the licence plates of the cars that pass me).  My initial impression of the software (downloaded from the Garmin website) is that it's reasonably user-friendly.  A 64MB micro-SD card gives it about 6.5 hours of recording time and the I think the battery is supposed to last about three hours (mine came with two batteries).  I also bought the Garmin VIRB external charger (sold separately, but it's multi-voltage and comes with plug adapters for use anywhere in the world) so I can always leave the house with two charged batteries if I need to.  It's water resistent for use up to 1m, but there is also a waterproof case available (which I don't have) if you want to go deeper.  The Elite version apparently has a GPS function (not sure if it can be used for navigation, but apparently it does recored location on the video - I don't have the Elite version).  I also think that I may be able to sync the regular VIRB with my bicycle GPS (also a Garmin product), but I haven't tried that yet.  One the downside, the audio isn't great and you need external lighting to use it in the dark (however, my 500 Lux headlight seems to suffice) and my light seems to dazzle licence plates so I can't read them if I'm shooting in the dark.

Like I said, I've only had it for a short time, so I haven't had much of a chance to fully appreciate it, but I think it's a viable option in comparison to the GoPro.  It's cheaper too.
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
290
Points
980
Update.

I went with a Hero 4 and have had it out for a few days of skiing since. It took me a bit to get used to the editing software, but I can now say that I'm learning that as well as the nuances of the camera. It's completely fucking awesome with bright light and contrast, so skiing ruled and I imagine any sort of boating would as well.

My advice, based on limited experience:
-get a spare battery
-go with at least 64 GB of cards, or have the means to transfer. I'm going on holiday soon and have to have extra cards or lug a laptop.
-get some sort of bag to carry all of the extras. You will end up with a few things. The guy that sold me mine said he doesn't make money off of the cameras, it's the accessories. There are loads.

Lastly, remember that you're limited only by your imagination. Get a couple of the clamp mounts and some ideas and you'll have this thing in all sorts of zany spots.
 

Pusser

Army.ca Veteran
Reaction score
1
Points
430
I too have had a chance to use my VIRB camera (by Garmin) a fair bit now and I have to say that I'm quite pleased with it.  It's quite easy to use and mounts nicely on my bicycle.  One of the best features is its vibration control (which you can turn on/off if you like).  When riding along a bumpy English road, I can look down and see that the camera is shaking quite a bit, but when I look at the video, it's still clear and stable.

The singularly best feature is the ability to sync it with my Garmin bicycle GPS.  I have the VIRB camera (the more basic version) and the "Edge Touring" GPS (also the most basic version from Garmin).  Using the VIRB software, I can sync the data from both instruments.  I usually have to adjust it a bit* because starting the GPS and the camera at exactly the same time is virtually impossible, but the end result is a split screen video that shows what the camera sees on one side and a map with a location marker (which moves) on the other.  The display also shows what speed you're doing at the same time.

*This is done manually.  I usually do it by watching the video until I find a spot where I stopped at an intersection and then finding that point on the map and moving the location marker to that spot.  The software does the rest.  I believe that syncing the more advanced versions of both the camera and GPS is more automatic and, therefore, even easier.

I'm not saying the VIRB is better than a GoPro ( I haven't tried one), but it certainly meets my needs.
 

Scott

Moderator
Staff member
Directing Staff
Subscriber
Reaction score
290
Points
980
Glad it works for you.

I haven't experienced too much shaky video with tree skiing, but also haven't had it on my bike yet so the jury will remain out on that. Youtube tried telling me they detected shakes in my video, but that comes with skiing over bumps or catching air. There is a vibration dampener that comes with the initial kit, but I haven't tried it out yet.

I can see the usefulness of the syncing between GPS and footage, just not for me.

My buddy has a Sony model of mini cam and while a bit bigger than the GoPro, it does the same job for him. I think the most fun part of having any of the iterations is how it changes how you think about your adventure(s). I am no pro by any means, but it has already been hellish fun seeing what I have captured while skiing - wipeouts included.
 
Top