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Engineering Officer

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souj

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Hey everyone, first post here

I will get my degree in electric engineering in december and for a while now, i've been looking at the army for a possible career, or at least a few years experience. Engineering seems like a good place to go. So what are the openings for a bilingual guy like me in the army, specifically for the engineer branch?

Also, the job description says engineers belongs of the Combat Arms. How true is that? I mean, how often do they take part in combat operations or patrols or related matters? Not that i have anything against it, my second choice is Infantry.

Finally, how often do engineers get deployed around the world and what's their primary work right now? Again with the job description, i saw they take cares of building/demolishing various stuff and minefield related-entertainment, though i'm doubt any service members might call it that. But what do they do most of the time?

And do you have any advice i might need to know? Right now, any help is welcome
 

tree hugger

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There are alot of different types of engineers in the military.  Combat engineering, airfield engineering, marine systems engineering, aerospace engineering, electrical/mechanical engineering...gotta be a few more.  Have you looked all through the dnd recruiting site?
 

McG

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souj said:
Also, the job description says engineers belongs of the Combat Arms. How true is that? I mean, how often do they take part in combat operations or patrols or related matters? Not that i have anything against it, my second choice is Infantry.
We are a part of every combat team and every battle group.  We permit friendly forces to live, move and fight on the battle field (fighting & under fire ourselves).  We are the "gurus" of mines, explosives, obstacles, and breaching.
 

zein

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Did you check the Canadian Forces site.... If not  go to www.forces.ca . This site provides valuable information on almost everything you need to know about trades and other related material.
 

Dakota

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There are so many areas that you can branch off and specialize in. Everyone is train in the Combat Engineer trade known as Sappers. Since you have a degree, you would be able enter as an officer. The first year or so would concentrate on Officer training and combat tactics. You could then select a specialized area of interest.

I have applied to be a Combat Engineer. To me it is very appealing and the trade selection is very widespread.

The motto is Ubique(Everywhere) Also "the first in and the last to leave."

Good luck.
 

McG

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Dakota said:
There are so many areas that you can branch off and specialize in.
This is misleading.  airfield engr, EME Offr, aerospace engr, ect do not start in the cbt engr world.  The are seperate occupations and start seperately as well.

However, an Engr (note the big "E") can get into specialisetion in construction engineering or the geo world after first doing a tout in a CER.  Sapper 6 would be the guy to talk about for more on these Engr career paths.
 
S

souj

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Thanks Earl, means a lot.

Anyway, I've been to a recruitment office and brought home a truck load of paperwork. I informed my family recently of my intentions and as i suspected, they were upset. Though i defended myself fairly well at the barrage of prejudices and misconception they have about the army, there was one i couldn't answer with much conviction.

My mother said she was worried that military service might put me at a disadvantage if i wanted to return to a civilian job. though I'm doubtful it's as bad as she tried to convince me, I've been wondering how ex military man are perceived by potential employers. Is it better or worst than a similar civilian job? What's are your opinions on this?
 

geo

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good golly Miss Molly,
how are military types perceived by those in industry?
pretty much the same way as they would perceive someone coming from another business or competitor EXCEPT that this guy (you) has his sh!t together. He can think, he can lead, he works well under pressure - he talks when he knows what he's talking about OR is smart enough to ask questions and find out when he doesn't. He knows how & when to take chances -  is a team player and they guy THEY want on their team.

Then there are always the dumbass wannabees that shoot off their mouth, from the hip, at 100 yds, who are loners and on which you can depend... they won't be there when you need em.

I don't know, I'm convinced - how about you?
 

Sapper6

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souj said:
Anyway, I've been to a recruitment office and brought home a truck load of paperwork. I informed my family recently of my intentions and as i suspected, they were upset. Though i defended myself fairly well at the barrage of prejudices and misconception they have about the army, there was one i couldn't answer with much conviction.

My mother said she was worried that military service might put me at a disadvantage if i wanted to return to a civilian job. though I'm doubtful it's as bad as she tried to convince me, I've been wondering how ex military man are perceived by potential employers. Is it better or worst than a similar civilian job? What's are your opinions on this?

Souj,

    Not sure if you are still around on this site or not...perhaps your family scared you off?

    As McG stated, I have some experience in the recruiting world and dare I say it, including those officers that release.  So, in as few words as possible I will say to you that the CF is one of the best employers in Canada, especially if you are young and lack experience.  I have dealt with many Combat Engineer officers and can honestly say, there is something for everyone if you have the following:

a. good head on your shoulder (ie. common sense),
b. fit
c. motivated (ie. self starter), and,
d. team player.

    You will get excellent training.  However, you must understand that you are joining a Combat Arm, therefore the focus is on operating in an austere environment and it is physically challenging.  But any young adult who is professionally minded should willingly accept the challenge of pushing oneself to the limit...makes you stronger.

    Finally, whether you complete a Term of Service or voluntarily release (6 month notice required) beforehand, I honestly believe your experiences are easily transferrable to the civilian sector.  Technical skills can be attained anywhere, intangibles such as leadership and mental toughness usually come from serving in the Army.  IMHO, I think your family may be misinformed and using bias from previous generations or perhaps, other countries.

S6  :army:
 

geeno

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Hello,
I'm in the ROTP for an engineering officer and was wondering whether the training I'll receive at the military engineering school in Gagetown and other experience in the militar will translate to time in getting a P.ENG license.  Or we may receive licenses once were qualified military engineers?, I'm not sure.  Do any Engineering Officers out there know.  THe only reason I'm asking is because in a long while from now I'll leave the military and I'll be looking for work in the private sector, and info would be helpful.
 

54/102 CEF

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Yes. Although I am not an Engr officer - I have worked with many who are P ENgs and all got it with all military experience
 

Spr.Earl

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geeno said:
Hello,
I'm in the ROTP for an engineering officer and was wondering whether the training I'll receive at the military engineering school in Gagetown and other experience in the militar will translate to time in getting a P.ENG license.  Or we may receive licenses once were qualified military engineers?, I'm not sure.  Do any Engineering Officers out there know.  THe only reason I'm asking is because in a long while from now I'll leave the military and I'll be looking for work in the private sector, and info would be helpful.

The Civie world will recognise you Mil.E. training and service and odd's on when it come's to a job you will be chosen ahead of a civiie because of your Mil.E. training and service.
 
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If I'm not mistaken, you will need your engineering degree from a university before you go to write your professional exam.  While CF training will likely help you vis-a-vie the applied side of the house, withought the degree and writing the exam, I don't think you're going to have much luck getting your iron ring. 
 

54/102 CEF

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Having one of the famous Iron rings in the family I know that its degree, IRON RING, experience, test - then P ENG.

Good luck - you can do it! :)
 

Jed

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No more is it like 'back in the day' when it was degree, ring, 2yrs experience, NO TEST, than P. Eng. lol
 

Flav

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Judging from the replies in this thread, I presume that one can use engineering experience in the military to be used towards the P. Eng. designation. But I was wondering though, would I have to transfer/apply to the provincial association where I'm being trained at?

I've applied for the AERE postion as my first choice and currently I'm being merit listed as a CELE. I have my B.E. degree and currently register as an Engineer in Training with APEGBC, but if I do get accepted, to my knowledge, I'll be training in St. Jean then to Kingston then to wherever I'll be posted when my training is done. Since the training in St. Jean is just the BOTP should I bother applying to the PEO while I'm in Kingston or just keep my BC license? It's not free to apply and to be licensed, so I don't want to be paying unnecessary fees. I probably should ask APEGBC if it would be okay licensed there and be working in another province.  :-\

Currently, I'm not sure if I want to have a career as a military engineer, but I would like to be enlisted and see if that is what I want to be doing. And at the minimum service a few years from now, I would like to have the P. Eng. designation just in case I decide to have my release from the service. So, for those that did get the experience for a P. Eng. through the military, did you bother being licensed during your service? Thanks.  :)
 

McG

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geeno said:
I'm in the ROTP for an engineering officer and was wondering whether the training I'll receive at the military engineering school in Gagetown and other experience in the militar will translate to time in getting a P.ENG license.  Or we may receive licenses once were qualified military engineers?, I'm not sure.  Do any Engineering Officers out there know. 
There are people who have used experience within the CME toward the requirements for a PEng.

Spr.Earl said:
The Civie world will recognise you Mil.E. training and service and odd's on when it come's to a job you will be chosen ahead of a civiie because of your Mil.E. training and service.
PEng is a professional certification that is required to legally practice engineering on civi street.  If an employer is looking for a PEng, then military experience is not going help if you don't have the certification. 
 
R

rormson

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My advice is for you to check with the Engineering Association to which you will apply for a licence. In the case of Ontario, the PEO (Professional Engineers Association) and APGO (Association of Professional Geoscientists "i.e. Engineering Geolgists") have published requirements. Generally, the minimum supervised level of work experience is 5 years. That work experience must be verified by a referee who is already a licenced member. In the reseve world I am aware of ex Reg Force personnel who are P.En gs in good standing and have had their mil exp recognized - - some; however, are not as they have not done any eng design work. The question is to what extent the applicable Professional Assoc will recognize your experience and essentially how that experience compares to the published minimums. Your university transcripts (whether from a Civ U or RMC) will also be evaluated by an education and experience committee.

Chimo
 

Cajun

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A quick question for any sappers out there...

As I understand it from the recruiting website, sometimes those with a college dip. in certain fields can be accepted DEO ENGR O. My question then, is how common or uncommon is it to see an Engineer Officer without a degree in Engineering?

In terms of my background, I have an arts degree, but I also have a post-grad adv. dip. in surveying/geomatics and have worked for 3 years in the subsea construction/engineering/surveying field in an operational capacity, all in positions whose 'Formal Requirements' included a BEng. Currently my first and only choice is Engineer, and my file is being sent in for a PLAR.

I've asked about the CEOTP, but was told it was not an option for the Engineer occupation. ROTP is really not an option for me either, as I've been out in the working world for a few years, and could not afford the time nor pay cut to go that route. I told the folks at recruiting I would be 110% willing to start working on a BEng part-time if accepted DEO, if thats what it takes, given that no CEOTP option is available.

All I'm trying to do is serve my country in the occupation I think I'd enjoy most, and be the most effective in. That, and I hear the CERs may be looking for a few more lads for their hockey teams  ;)

I appreciate any comments or advice.

SA














 
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