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Cosmic impact found on ancient city

Colin Parkinson

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People worry about Climate change and I worry about asteroids because they can undo all our efforts in a split second. We need to get into space and create a planet defense system. The evidence of cosmic impacts and events shaping our planet and human history is mounting.


A favorite site for archaeologists and biblical scholars, the mound hosts evidence of culture all the way from the Chalcolithic, or Copper Age, all compacted into layers as the highly strategic settlement was built, destroyed and rebuilt over millennia.

But there is a 1.5-meter interval in the Middle Bronze Age II stratum that caught the interest of some researchers for its "highly unusual" materials. In addition to the debris one would expect from destruction via warfare and earthquakes, they found pottery shards with outer surfaces melted into glass, "bubbled" mudbrick and partially melted building material, all indications of an anomalously high-temperature event, much hotter than anything the technology of the time could produce.
 

Kirkhill

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The thing I like about "the other guys", those that don't conform, is that they drag up the data that everyone else tends to sideline and bring it centre stage for a while. Soon enough there are enough extraneous points that alternate patterns can be suggested.

Some folks would call it following the science. 😁
 

Colin Parkinson

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My friend found a better article, 4m thick walls sheared off by the event, it would have sucked badly to been in the city at that time
 

brihard

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Damn, that’s wild.

I went down a bit of a rabbit hole reading a few other articles about that. There’s interesting speculation about how oral history of this event may have made it into the Bible, potentially forming the basis of the story of Sodom and Gomorrah.
 

FSTO

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Damn, that’s wild.

I went down a bit of a rabbit hole reading a few other articles about that. There’s interesting speculation about how oral history of this event may have made it into the Bible, potentially forming the basis of the story of Sodom and Gomorrah.
Well of course! The flood and Noah's ark was likely started as a campfire tale by some goat herders about a big rain that flooded the area. The entire bible is just bullshit tall tales that someone in ancient times decided to collect into one book. Then some cult leader used it a basis for the swindling of his flock!
 

brihard

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Well of course! The flood and Noah's ark was likely started as a campfire tale by some goat herders about a big rain that flooded the area. The entire bible is just bullshit tall tales that someone in ancient times decided to collect into one book. Then some cult leader used it a basis for the swindling of his flock!

Biblical literalism is never going to fare well when subject to scrutiny, but there’s nothing wrong with accepting the reality that any major religion has likely incorporated very real historical elements into its narrative. Is it reasonable to think a several megaton meteor blast smoked a few then-major cities, and this just got completely overlooked in the historical stories of the time, but meanwhile cultural traditions that eventually got written down coincidentally include accounts of a fire-and-brimstone smiting of an entire urban area? I personally don’t think that would get completely overlooked.

There’s a lot of interesting and plausible historicity to various aspects of the Old Testament. People talk and tell stories about things that happen, and eventually started writing them down. That’s a far cry from ‘bullshit tales’. Do I believe that a great rain for fourth days covered the entire earth minus one dude and his family who built a boat and somehow got a breeding pair of every animal? Of course not. Genetic and geological evidence contradicts that. But sure as hell there were major floods in ancient Mesopotamia that could account for some of this history, and many civilizations have at various points had flood myths, and ample geological evidence out of Iraq supports the theory of some floods having been locally cataclysmic.

Anyway- it’s an interesting story, and interesting (to me, at least) to see researchers potentially matching actual historical events with the history and myth that likely underpins some of the stories found within the Abrahamic religions. For me to say that is not an attack on your or anyone’s beliefs.
 

FSTO

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Biblical literalism is never going to fare well when subject to scrutiny, but there’s nothing wrong with accepting the reality that any major religion has likely incorporated very real historical elements into its narrative. Is it reasonable to think a several megaton meteor blast smoked a few then-major cities, and this just got completely overlooked in the historical stories of the time, but meanwhile cultural traditions that eventually got written down coincidentally include accounts of a fire-and-brimstone smiting of an entire urban area? I personally don’t think that would get completely overlooked.

There’s a lot of interesting and plausible historicity to various aspects of the Old Testament. People talk and tell stories about things that happen, and eventually started writing them down. That’s a far cry from ‘bullshit tales’. Do I believe that a great rain for fourth days covered the entire earth minus one dude and his family who built a boat and somehow got a breeding pair of every animal? Of course not. Genetic and geological evidence contradicts that. But sure as hell there were major floods in ancient Mesopotamia that could account for some of this history, and many civilizations have at various points had flood myths, and ample geological evidence out of Iraq supports the theory of some floods having been locally cataclysmic.

Anyway- it’s an interesting story, and interesting (to me, at least) to see researchers potentially matching actual historical events with the history and myth that likely underpins some of the stories found within the Abrahamic religions. For me to say that is not an attack on your or anyone’s beliefs.
And that Christianity basically co-opted pagan ceremonies for conversion purposes.
 

brihard

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And that Christianity basically co-opted pagan ceremonies for conversion purposes.
Sure. There’s an inherent political aspect to the spread of a religion. If working with and through local custom helps achieve the ends, why not? There’s a lot of overlap between the purely spiritual, and the cultural.
 

Remius

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Biblical literalism is never going to fare well when subject to scrutiny, but there’s nothing wrong with accepting the reality that any major religion has likely incorporated very real historical elements into its narrative. Is it reasonable to think a several megaton meteor blast smoked a few then-major cities, and this just got completely overlooked in the historical stories of the time, but meanwhile cultural traditions that eventually got written down coincidentally include accounts of a fire-and-brimstone smiting of an entire urban area? I personally don’t think that would get completely overlooked.

There’s a lot of interesting and plausible historicity to various aspects of the Old Testament. People talk and tell stories about things that happen, and eventually started writing them down. That’s a far cry from ‘bullshit tales’. Do I believe that a great rain for fourth days covered the entire earth minus one dude and his family who built a boat and somehow got a breeding pair of every animal? Of course not. Genetic and geological evidence contradicts that. But sure as hell there were major floods in ancient Mesopotamia that could account for some of this history, and many civilizations have at various points had flood myths, and ample geological evidence out of Iraq supports the theory of some floods having been locally cataclysmic.

Anyway- it’s an interesting story, and interesting (to me, at least) to see researchers potentially matching actual historical events with the history and myth that likely underpins some of the stories found within the Abrahamic religions. For me to say that is not an attack on your or anyone’s beliefs.
There are several studies into the “historicity” of the Bible. Especially in regards to the Old Testament. Some fascinating links to events in the past that have basis in truth and fact and “borrowed” stories from previous cultures and civilisations and incorporated into their own and becomes part of their oral history. The story of Noah is believed to be based on a much older tale. Gilgamesh I believe. Like you i don’t believe the earth was covered in water and only Noah survived with all those animals. But we’re indeed geological events back then that could account for flooding. Volcanoes or earthquakes leading to Tsunamies that could wipe out fledgling civilisations. Some guy could have tried to save his farm by loading a bunch of farm animals and his family on a barge and float around for a few days. The story spreads and centuries and millennia go by and the story of this guy gets a bit exaggerated. Most Historians agree that a person called Jesus Christ existed. And was crucified. But that is pretty much all they agree on. It is all very fascinating to me as well. And that some people try to make those links of fact vs myth is pretty cool.
 

Remius

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There is a guy on a YouTube called the Metatron. He gets into the weeds on historical things. Like into stuff like the metallurgy of various Eras weapons and armour. He has a big slant towards all things Roman. But he does a great job breaking down all sorts of historical questions.

He has a video on the historicity if Christ. I thought it was pretty good.

 

FJAG

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Well of course! The flood and Noah's ark was likely started as a campfire tale by some goat herders about a big rain that flooded the area. The entire bible is just bullshit tall tales that someone in ancient times decided to collect into one book. Then some cult leader used it a basis for the swindling of his flock!
There's actually a fairly good hypothesis of a major and relatively rapid flooding event of the Black Sea around 7,500 years ago that many consider the factual background behind Noah's flood.

There's a quick Wiki link here:


I was doing some research a few years ago for a novel about the late Neolithic period in North America (around 8,000 BC) and was quite intrigued about the changing geography and zoology resulting from the retreating ice age. Key in much of this was that the ice age locked massive volumes of water into ice dropping world sea levels by 400 feet or so. The retreat of the ice caused a widespread sea level rise including an event called the Laurentide Ice Sheet collapse which released vast quantities of water that had been trapped in North America. Some have tied this in as a causative event of the Black Sea deluge although there are many who disagree (including me - I think they were too far separated in time).

Nonetheless, there were many events of flooding during this period, when human civilization was stabilizing, as sea levels rose dramatically and water courses changed directions. People of the time would have seen noticeable changes over the generations (especially in the Black Sea) and would have created many flooding legends passed orally and by some of the first written texts.

What I find interesting is that, like the Noah's flood and like Sodom and Gomorrah, a more detailed examinations through archeology provides an explanation of an event which early superstitious societies ascribed to some supreme being are in fact the result of a natural but catastrophic event.

🍻
 

Colin Parkinson

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The West Coast rebounded from 20-200m when the ice retreated, coupled with raising water levels, it's likley we are looking in the wrong places for evidence of early human occupation of North America.
 

FJAG

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The West Coast rebounded from 20-200m when the ice retreated, coupled with raising water levels, it's likley we are looking in the wrong places for evidence of early human occupation of North America.
Quite true. In the Black Sea much of the research deals with much later sunken ships which are well preserved and generally more "sexy" archeology, but amongst one of Ballard's expeditions they came up with a house some 300 feet down.


🍻
 

Remius

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The West Coast rebounded from 20-200m when the ice retreated, coupled with raising water levels, it's likley we are looking in the wrong places for evidence of early human occupation of North America.
There is an emerging archeological field that is looking at that very thing.

 

OldSolduer

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And that Christianity basically co-opted pagan ceremonies for conversion purposes.
Like many other religions have. The original bible was written several hundred years after the death of JC. And it was written in Greek IIRC.

And we all know stories are embellished as they get older.
 

Colin Parkinson

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There are detailed accounts of the Quaran being written, well condensed and edited from about 500 different versions to 6 official ones and that was a mere 20 years after Muhammad death.
 
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