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CIC TRAINING

Finder

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Hello all,  long time lurker first time poster on these forums.  I am a newly minted ocdt.. I need a little help.  I have been out of cadets and the mitary for 17 years now.  Now that I am back would like abit of a head start on the botc and any other ocdt courses i will need to train in.  Ive read in these forums and have seen past post on this type of requests however the links were broken.  If anyone has new links or resources which could prep me or help me get a better basic grasp before i go i wouldgladly pay back in kind. 

Thx
 

my72jeep

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Welcome to the CIC.
If you have a CCO Net account all the info can be found in the File Repository on the RCIS links.
 

StarFury

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Finder said:
Hello all,  long time lurker first time poster on these forums.  I am a newly minted ocdt.. I need a little help.  I have been out of cadets and the mitary for 17 years now.  Now that I am back would like abit of a head start on the botc and any other ocdt courses i will need to train in.  Ive read in these forums and have seen past post on this type of requests however the links were broken.  If anyone has new links or resources which could prep me or help me get a better basic grasp before i go i wouldgladly pay back in kind. 

Thx

The first course that you will take will be the CIC BOTC.

The CIC BOTC is delivered in two phases; the first, a distributed learning (DL) phase is conducted by the CIC Centre for Distributed Learning (CDL) online through the DNDLearn platform (until 1 May 13, after which it will transition to the new DLN Saba platform). It is normally conducted over a one month timeframe.  Successful completion of the DL phase is required in order to be loaded on the second phase, an in-house (IH) portion conducted by one of the five Regional Cadet Instructor Schools (RCISs). The IH phase is often run in a weekend format, but many RCISs also run a continuous format serial once or twice a year, normally in advance of the summer training season.

The following material is covered on the CIC BOTC:

PO 101 - Adhere to Canadian Forces Regulations and Values
PO 102 - Lead Subordinates
PO 103 - Comply with Safety, Security, and Environmental Protection Policies and Procedures
PO 104 - Communicate Orally and in Writing
PO 105 - Plan Activities
PO 106 - Conduct Activities
PO 107 - Perform Basic Drill Movements at the Halt and on the March
PO 108 - Fire the Cadet Air Rifle
PO 109 - Maintain Personal Health and Fitness

Following completion of the BOTC, you will take the CIC Occupational Training Course (OTC).

Like the CIC BOTC, the OTC is conducted in two phases with the first, a DL phase, being prerequisite for the second, an IH phase.

The fol material makes up the CIC OTC:

PO 101 - Adhere to Canadian Cadet Organization (CCO) Regulations and Values
PO 102 - Lead Cadets
PO 103 - Communicate with Canadian Cadet Movement (CCM) Partners
PO 104 - Instruct Personnel

After the CIC OTC, the next course (with regards to baseline training) will be the appropriate Environmental Training Course to match one's elemental affiliation (Sea, Air, or Land).  Theses courses are, once again, split into two phases (DL & IH).

As an example, the CIC Land Environmental Training Course (LETC) consists of the fol:

PO 101 - Exemplify the Professional Attributes of a CIC (Land) Officer
PO 102 - Perform the Duties of a Platoon Commander
PO 103 - Deliver the Army Cadet Training System
PO 104 - Communicate using Land-Based Radios
PO 105 - Navigate Over Land
PO 106 - Participate in an Overnight Field Training Exercise
PO 107 - Participate in an Army Cadet Field Training Exercise
PO 108 - Conduct a Recce of an Established Trail

 

Jarnhamar

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X Royal said:
What is traing? ???

He means training but he misspelled it traing. He missed an N in the word. Also looks like he missed an I  :eek:
 

Danjanou

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ObedientiaZelum said:
He means training but he misspelled it traing. He missed an N in the word. Also looks like he missed an I  :eek:

Fixed
 

Finder

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Thanka for tbe replys and sorry about the typos.  Using a galaxy$ 1 and my fingers are not that small.

Anyhow some pretty useful info.  I do not have an account yet or my own access to fortress.  Just hoping i could mybe get some added info to prep myself in my free time before doing the course itself.    Perhaps the coure mat itself or a good summery of it.  Thanks again and a sorry in advance to those grabmert nutzies...  Using a smart phone n all.  ;)

Newly minted ocdt
 

Snakedoc

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Out of curiousity, at what point does a CIC officer reach the OFP for their officer classification?  After the CIC occupational course I would assume?  Or is there a specific point?  Cheers.
 

gwp

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Snakedoc said:
Out of curiousity, at what point does a CIC officer reach the OFP for their officer classification?  After the CIC occupational course I would assume?  Or is there a specific point?  Cheers.
I presume you mean Operationaly Functional Point -

A person without any former military service who enrolls in the Canadian Forces Cadet Instructors Branch is enrolled as an Officer/Naval cadet and may be employed immediately at a local cadet corps/squadron where on the job training begins immediately.  After completing the approximatly 9 weeks of DL and in house training on BOTC and Occupational Qualification Course along with the OJT during the service period, the candidate is eligible to be promoted to 2Lt/Acting S/Lt after a years service or if the candidate has a university degree.  Promotion must be recommended to and approved by the Commanding Officer of the Regional Cadet Headquarters. 

As mentioned above, follow on training includes on the job activity, supported by the Environmental Training Course then the Intermediate Officer Course along with specialist courses in supply, administration, range safety officer in order to provide the services required to run a corps or squadron.  Corps Squadron Commanding Officers are required to have advanced training as well the Commanding Officer's Course.

Additionally, there is a long list of other courses available including:

Basic Safety Officer Training Course (BSOTC)
Unit Environmental Officer (Env O)
Glider Instructor Course (GIC)
Tow Aircraft Conversion Course (TACC)
Launch Control Officer (LCO)
Band Officer (Band O)
Range Safety Officer – Smallbore (RSO (SB))
Range Safety Officer — Air Rifle (RSO AR)
Range Safety Officer — Large Bore (RSO (LB))
Sailing Coach
Small Craft Operator Program (SCOP) Instructor
Tender Officer in Charge Course (TOIC)
ORCA Class Patrol Craft Tender Officer in Charge Course (ORCA OIC)
Cold Weather Leader (CWL)
Abseil Instructor Course (AIC)
Orienteering Instructor (OIC)
Basic Canoe Instructor (BCI)
Canoe Trip Leader (CTL)
Moving Water Canoe Leader Course (MWCLC)
Naval Field Gun Safety Course (NFGSC)

A person with former military service who transfers to the Cadet Organizations Administration and Training Service Reserve Subcomponent will be assessed as to whether to skip the BOTC and take the MOC training or not.  One aspect is how long they have been away from the service. 
 

quadrapiper

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gwp - very informative, but doesn't address OFP. Pardon my dreadful memory, but that'd be the point at which a member is employable in their trade or specialty?

On a practical level, rather hard to pin down for CIC - newly-enrolled NCdts are immediately employed "in trade" while waiting for training.

If memory serves, I heard something about OFP and the conclusion of BOTC, OCC, and the relevant environmental course.
 

gun runner

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You are correct. I am a Lieutenant with an Army cadet corps, and I was deemed OFP after my LETC course. I spent the time after my BOTC/OCC course teaching basic(green star) cadets the Cadet program for their level every LHQ session. I still spend my time in the classroom/parade square when I am in the armouries for LHQ sessions. My time as an Ocdt. was spent attending lectures, and assisting in drill class, but not actually teaching. Post BPTC/OCC I was teaching these classes, and now, I am sitting in and evaluating the lectures/drill sessions conducted by other members. Time wise, I would have to say that unless you are attested and then are immediately departing for BOTC/OCC training, you will be waiting a minimum of 4-6mos at your LHQ before you go. Your time would probably be spent much as mine was. Learning how to handle a class of twelve year olds, and keep them focussed on the lesson. This is difficult, considering you have around 30-40 mins of time to conduct the lesson. After LHQ, if your course date is on the horizon, you will be at your home computer hip deep in DLearning in preparation for the BOTC/OCC. This will take about three weeks of solid effort to complete(2-3hours/session). All I can suggest, is study, and ask questions of your fellow officers/instructors. Good luck, and welcome to toonville! Ask any member of the PRes/RegF why we are called toons, they might just answer you.
 

gwp

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quadrapiper said:
On a practical level, rather hard to pin down for CIC - newly-enrolled NCdts are immediately employed "in trade" while waiting for training.

Quite right. The reality is that at the cadet corps/squadron the CIC MOC not only includes "leading, managing the cadet program and delivering the cadet training" it includes serving as AdminO, RMS Clerk, Finance Clerk, Supply Off, Supply Tech, Training Officer, Operations Officer, Transport Officer, Rations Clerk, Cook, Accomodations Officer, PAO and more.  Few corps/squadrons have the luxury of having a program of introduction as outlined by gunrunner.  The exigencies of the service require that a warm and willing body be employed in the service of the cadets at the outset. 

If memory serves, I heard something about OFP and the conclusion of BOTC, OCC, and the relevant environmental course.

That is probably the first point when reality and formal training meet. 
 

LittleBlackDevil

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Rather than start a new thread, it made sense to me to post a question here in this thread that already has a lot of very helpful information.

StarFury said:
The CIC BOTC is delivered in two phases; the first, a distributed learning (DL) phase is conducted by the CIC Centre for Distributed Learning (CDL) online through the DNDLearn platform (until 1 May 13, after which it will transition to the new DLN Saba platform). It is normally conducted over a one month timeframe.  Successful completion of the DL phase is required in order to be loaded on the second phase, an in-house (IH) portion conducted by one of the five Regional Cadet Instructor Schools (RCISs). The IH phase is often run in a weekend format, but many RCISs also run a continuous format serial once or twice a year, normally in advance of the summer training season.

Question specifically about the "Distributed Learning" ... how does this work? Do you have to log-in every day for classes? Can you work through the materials at your own pace? How much time per day/week on average should one expect to spend on the DL?

Just wondering what I need to "gird my loins" for and do some planning ahead. I'm self employed so I have some flexibility, but I also work a lot of hours so I may want to make sure I book myself some light days here-and-there for when I am expected to do the DL stuff (which at this point I have no idea when it will be since I'm still in the recruitment process but closing-in on my interview having already completed medical and background/reference checks).
 

Burrows

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LittleBlackDevil said:
Rather than start a new thread, it made sense to me to post a question here in this thread that already has a lot of very helpful information.

Question specifically about the "Distributed Learning" ... how does this work? Do you have to log-in every day for classes? Can you work through the materials at your own pace? How much time per day/week on average should one expect to spend on the DL?

Just wondering what I need to "gird my loins" for and do some planning ahead. I'm self employed so I have some flexibility, but I also work a lot of hours so I may want to make sure I book myself some light days here-and-there for when I am expected to do the DL stuff (which at this point I have no idea when it will be since I'm still in the recruitment process but closing-in on my interview having already completed medical and background/reference checks).

The DL is primarily self-directed.  There are weekly timeframes in which certain tasks must be completed (discussion posts, etc.).  When you are loaded on your course, you will be given a breakdown of what is covered and in what order, as well as a schedule that is specific to that course.

The DL is conducted through the Defence Learning Network (DLN), which can be accessed through a civilian computer.  You will need to ensure that your CCONet account is set up as all communication will be to you @cadets.gc.ca email address.

The new BOTC course duration is fairly on the mark for the time allotment, which I believe was 7 paid days.  Prepare yourself for some decently long study sessions as some of the content is not easy to pick up and set down. 

Keep in mind that this course is NOT your CIC training course, it is designed to equip you with basic skills for carrying yourself as an officer in the CAF.  It has been designed to serve this purpose, so you can expect to learn quite a bit about the CAF and Officer-ship and very little about working with cadets (this will be covered in occupational training).
 

Gunnar

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So, just to bring life to a mostly dead thread...what can I expect from BOTC?  Drill?  Ironing?  Polishing shoes & obstacle courses followed by classroom training?  Waterman training?  I have no idea how much “normal” stuff they put CIC through, but I expect in ten days it’s not going to be as intense as 1 1/2 weeks of BMQ.  What’s a normal BOTC day like (after the DLN portion)?
 

ArmyRick

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One of my last jobs in the CF before retiring was Drill Sergeant Major (different than the RCR DSM in role) for CIC BOTC.
I worked with CWO (ret'd) Elli Aucoin (great man). In Borden. Its 8 days and your schedule is full. It really doesn't do alot of inspecting barracks or kit checks or stuff like that.

Your days are very long and your looking at 2 drill sessions every day. Their is a leadership classroom portion where you will learn and do task procedure (watered down BP).

I have seen people failed off the course. Elli and I used to hammer people pretty hard on the parade square. I was also expected to hover around the lecture building and growl at OCDTs for dress, deportment, drill, conduct, etc.
 

gwp

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Gunnar said:
So, just to bring life to a mostly dead thread...what can I expect from BOTC?  Drill?  Ironing?  Polishing shoes & obstacle courses followed by classroom training?  Waterman training?  I have no idea how much “normal” stuff they put CIC through, but I expect in ten days it’s not going to be as intense as 1 1/2 weeks of BMQ.  What’s a normal BOTC day like (after the DLN portion)?

The aim of the Basic Officer Training Course (BOTC) is to introduce course candidates to the military environment, teach basic military and leadership skills common to all CF officers, guide the development of officer-like qualities and provide opportunities to apply leadership. Phase 1 is delivered by four weeks of computer based distributed learning (DL) and on the job training that must be completed before moving on to the inhouse Phase 2 that involves eight days classroom training (10 days if Standard First Aid is included for those not qualified already). The BOTC Course content includes:

Adhere to CF Regulations and Values
Lead Subordinates
Comply with Safety, Security and Environmental Protection Policies
Communicate Orally and in Writing
Plan Activities
Conduct Activities
Perform Basic Drill Movements at the Halt and on the March
Maintain Personal Health and Fitness

Some of this you will have been introduced to during the "on line" training.  The primary purpose is to allow you to get injected with CF esprit de corps and more importantly hoist in the profound responsibility and duty of meeting the mission/aim of the cadet organizations, to lead and look after and care for the cadets.   
 

Burrows

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Gunnar said:
So, just to bring life to a mostly dead thread...what can I expect from BOTC?  Drill?  Ironing?  Polishing shoes & obstacle courses followed by classroom training?  Waterman training?  I have no idea how much “normal” stuff they put CIC through, but I expect in ten days it’s not going to be as intense as 1 1/2 weeks of BMQ.  What’s a normal BOTC day like (after the DLN portion)?

Your BOTC timetable will typically be 8-4/5 with other fun stuff peppered in. You will receive a course schedule on your first day.

A regular day may be something like this:

0600-0645 - Ablutions/Dress Yourself/Make sure you don't look like a bag of hammers and make sure your people don't look like a bag of hammers.
0700-0740 - Breakfast
0740-0800 - Form up and inspection w/ course staff and course senior.
0800-1100 - Classes (everything from drill to Military Law and tasking - learn SMESC now if you can)
1100-1200 - Lunch
1200-1600 - Classes
1700-1800 - Dinner
1800-End - Personal time with the exception of mandatory scheduled activities (some courses like to go to the gym, some prefer to have meet and greets at the Officers Mess, at some point there will be a mess dinner, etc.)  Good time to work on assignments.

Some of the evening events are mandatory (Meet and Greet, Course Interviews, Mess Dinner, etc.) and some are coordinated by staff or your own peers if folks need extra help or want to bounce ideas.  Best advice I can give is to take advantage of these informal meetings as well as it will help you to confirm your own understanding.

When it comes to confirmation of the learning, you will typically have one opportunity to re-do an unsuccessful performance check.  If your second attempt is not successful, you will have a Performance Review Board with the Senior Instructor (SI).

If there is anything you come pre-equipped with for your BOTC, I'd recommend you make sure all of the following knowledge is included:

* Basic knowledge of moving and stationary drill. (Enough to execute movements)
* Care of your uniform(s)
* How to polish your shoes/parade boots (if you have parade boots and oxfords, bring both)
* How to wear your uniform(s) properly (everything from how to use boot bands, properly formed beret, lint rolled, not looking like a bag of hammers, etc.)
* How to approach an office

These are core "life skills" that you should know upon showing up.  Unlike the RegF, your first time in uniform with the CAF is not part of your Basic - your staff will have a very reasonable expectation that someone has taken the time to teach you how to do these basic things before sending you on course.  (You know, and the hope is that your CO or their designate did this instead of letting an OCdt free to wander aimlessly)
 
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