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Arctic/Offshore Patrol Ship AOPS

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After all the images I've seen of these ships, I just noticed that the bow anchor(s) well (or whatever it's called - not a sailor) is right down at the waterline. It seems that it would be right in the middle of the bow wave and be susceptible to ice damage. Just curious if there is a reason or if it really matters.
Ice no. When icebreaking you aren't bouncing up and down like in seas and ice is pushed aside or under the bow, not up it.

There is a problem during heavy seas that when a wave hits the anchor at the right angle the pressure shoots water up the hawsepipe into the covered foc'sle. They have had to do some waterproofing for things they didn't expect to get that wet. They also put rubber stoppers around the cable but really that just changes the trajectory of the water spout.
 

TacticalTea

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Ice no. When icebreaking you aren't bouncing up and down like in seas and ice is pushed aside or under the bow, not up it.

There is a problem during heavy seas that when a wave hits the anchor at the right angle the pressure shoots water up the hawsepipe into the covered foc'sle. They have had to do some waterproofing for things they didn't expect to get that wet. They also put rubber stoppers around the cable but really that just changes the trajectory of the water spout.
So, one of the hawse pipes had a purpose-built metal plate with a semi-circle cut-out (for the anchor cable) you could slide into two horizontal slits along the hole to reduce water ingress. So did the other, but it had a badly-built metal plate instead. Hah! So it got stuck and took a while to get dislodged and thus, wasn't used again.

So it was replaced by logs, rope, and a fender.
 

newfin

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Strange but true..... Today, while vacationing with my family on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico, I looked offshore and saw what looked like a naval vessel in the distance. I said to my son, "That looks like a Harry DeWolf class ship!" I instantly recognized the two large recesses in the side of the ship that house the blaze orange life boat and Multi-role rescue boat. I thought to myself that I had to be mistaken since....What are the odds that I'm in Mexico and so is the HDW AND I actually see and recognize it so far from shore? Well, I borrowed my daughters' phone to check a vessel tracking app and sure as sh!t there it was.... the HDW herself a few kilometres offshore making her way south between the Yucatan Peninsula and Cozumel Island . Since I live in Niagara Ontario I have never had the chance to see an AOPV myself but this first sighting was quite a treat. I hope the RCN brings her on a Great Lakes tour soon for me to board her visit.
 

Rainbow1910

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Rainbow1910

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HMCS Harry DeWolf and HMCS Margaret Brooke recently alongside in Key West, Florida. DeWolf is operating as part of Operation CARIBBE and Brooke is conducting warm weather trials.
 
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