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All things Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

QV

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Read the article. The child died WITH COVID, not FROM it. I can't imagine having COVID helped with his medical issues though.

A child died in Alberta recently but they had “complex pre-existing medical conditions” which played a significant role.

The headline implies C19 killed the child. Further down it clarifies C19 was not the reason for the hospitalization or the death. How tf can you not see the difference between the headline and the last sentence?

What kind of crap journalism would write that? Are the standards of writing and editing that low? I don't believe that many people are collectively that stupid, which means the misleading headline can only have been on purpose.
 

Booter

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The headline implies C19 killed the child. Further down it clarifies C19 was not the reason for the hospitalization or the death. How tf can you not see the difference between the headline and the last sentence?

What kind of crap journalism would write that? Are the standards of writing and editing that low? I don't believe that many people are collectively that stupid, which means the misleading headline can only have been on purpose.
Those paragraphs are talking about two different children.
 

QV

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My constant rage in this is because of how everything is characterized. And I believe it is manipulated to an extent.

Here is an example; take a child that has severe combined immunodeficiency (at serious risk from bacteria and virus' that aren't life threatening to healthy people). If this child dies after contracting the common cold, we don't say "child killed by common cold" because the common cold is not lethal. The child died because they had a compromised immune system. During this pandemic, it is only C19 that kills, advanced age and comorbidities including terminal brain cancer have been ignored when reporting on deaths.
 

Blackadder1916

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View attachment 67287

Stuff like this ruins all credibility . . .

Source? Link? Yes, it does ruin your credibility.

Remius did provide a link to a reputable (?) Australian daily that included the exact wording, with a 3-person byline that included the individual in your story's byline, though with a more appropriate headline. But when he later mentioned "The Tasmanian Sun" as picking it up and changing the headline for brevity or whatever reason (clickbait, nefariousness, bad journalism), I had difficulty finding the version you provided in that publication. Actually, I had trouble finding any news outlet called "The Tasmanian Sun". Then I realized, duh, the "Sun" appellation was probably a generic nod to tabloids, particularly corner cutting tabloids.

So that brings me back to the question - where did this come from? It's one thing to smear "media" as having no credibility when one can point to a source and follow the trail to nefariousness, it's another when a excerpt from another publication with only a partial byline (the original authors were all staff of the Herald Sun) is displayed with a different headline and then used as evidence of bad journalism.

It's not as if you would have to go very far to find journalistic inconsistencies with this story. In a Republicworld.com article the headline is

Australia Registers Youngest Death From COVID-19; Child Under 10 Dies In Victoria​


But that online news site is not Australian (it's Indian) nor does it have a particularly good reputation (known for a right wing bent, sensationalism, poor fact gathering . . . ). Likewise, the reproduction in your post is probably a poorly altered plagiarization by anyone of the numerous "news consolidators" that can be found on the net. Or it could just as easily be an altered plagiarization by someone who wants to use it for the same reason that you posted it here. So it all comes back to . . . where did you find it?
 

Jarnhamar

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When Covid hit and started ramping up there were videos of people in positions of authority, including state governors, admitting that peoples deaths were counted as covid deaths even though they died from other causes (they incidentally had Covid).


As for headlines being accidental I don't buy it. An infantry cpl being ordered to write up a story for the base news paper screwing up a headline and it slipping into production? Maybe.

Journalists spend on average 4 years in post secondary education to learn their trade. They know how to check their work, they know how important and nuanced words can be (it's their job) and they have experienced editors. News papers used to make money selling news papers. Now they make money when people click on their articles.
 
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daftandbarmy

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Meanwhile, in Peru:

How Peru became the country with the highest COVID death rate in the world


With 200,000 COVID deaths in a population of less than 33 million, the impact of the pandemic in Peru has been particularly devastating: the country has the highest COVID death rate per head of population worldwide. It’s also estimated to have one of the world’s worst rates of children being orphaned or bereft of their caregivers due to COVID.

Yet, compared to many other countries, on paper Peru was relatively well-placed to handle COVID. It is an upper-middle-income country – and before COVID had been performing well economically. Life expectancy had been rising and poverty falling, and it had been making good progress on improving public health, with access to healthcare increasing.

Peru was also one of the first Latin American countries to demand that people stay at home to stop the virus spreading. Unlike in some other badly affected Latin American countries, such as Brazil or Mexico, authorities in Peru didn’t deny the threat of the pandemic.

So how has it still ended up in such a bad situation?


 

Remius

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Meanwhile, in Peru:

How Peru became the country with the highest COVID death rate in the world


With 200,000 COVID deaths in a population of less than 33 million, the impact of the pandemic in Peru has been particularly devastating: the country has the highest COVID death rate per head of population worldwide. It’s also estimated to have one of the world’s worst rates of children being orphaned or bereft of their caregivers due to COVID.

Yet, compared to many other countries, on paper Peru was relatively well-placed to handle COVID. It is an upper-middle-income country – and before COVID had been performing well economically. Life expectancy had been rising and poverty falling, and it had been making good progress on improving public health, with access to healthcare increasing.

Peru was also one of the first Latin American countries to demand that people stay at home to stop the virus spreading. Unlike in some other badly affected Latin American countries, such as Brazil or Mexico, authorities in Peru didn’t deny the threat of the pandemic.

So how has it still ended up in such a bad situation?


The use of invermectin didn’t seem to do any good…

 

Booter

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When Covid hit and started ramping up there were videos of people in positions of authority, including state governors, admitting that peoples deaths were counted as covid deaths even though they died from other causes (they incidentally had Covid).


As for headlines being accidental I don't buy it. An infantry cpl being ordered to write up a story for the base news paper screwing up a headline and it slipping into production? Maybe.

Journalists spend on average 4 years in post secondary education to learn their trade. They know how to check their work, they know how important and nuanced words can be (it's their job) and they have experienced editors. News papers used to make money selling news papers. Now they make money when people click on their articles.
You don’t buy it because you have decided not to buy it. Newspapers being garbage isn’t a new phenomenon.
 

MJP

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I'm fairly impressed with how the process was all put together, to be honest. Streamlined, standardized and 'tested'.

For once I've got compliments for folks in the HHQ.
Agreed it was nice to see a straightforward approach.

I would love to see a more streamlined approach to lots of conduct issues, instead of having to deal with lingering to turds for months if not years
 

Jarnhamar

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Newspapers being garbage isn’t a new phenomenon.
No it's not. But they're becoming increasingly sensationalized, polarizing, and political.
I'm fairly impressed with how the process was all put together, to be honest. Streamlined, standardized and 'tested'.

For once I've got compliments for folks in the HHQ.
I saw some goofy speed wobbles with attestation forms but all in all surprised and impressed as well. I predicted the CAF would cave and drag the process out or support any and every HR and religious claim.
 
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Remius

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That’s a super fair characterization
I would argue they have always been sensationalized, polarizing and political. This is nothing new. So I find the outrage and claim that “they are becoming” a bit much given the history of the free press in western culture. The free press has never been unbiased.
 

Booter

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I think, and most of the time that’s worth very little, it’s become easier to fracture yourself along your political lines now- while the media has always had its slant- now I can only read views that are mine.

Then I am shocked and outraged at the way my views are characterized by the other side when I happen across them.

It used to be with tv your local news was your local news, your paper was your paper. Now I can organize my information by ideology instead of geography 🤷‍♀️
 

Jarnhamar

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I would argue they have always been sensationalized, polarizing and political. This is nothing new. So I find the outrage and claim that “they are becoming” a bit much given the history of the free press in western culture. The free press has never been unbiased.
Yea, maybe. I still think we have some hanlon's spoon going on.
 
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