Author Topic: Outdoor Gear Thread  (Read 121117 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rinker

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 1,450
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 88
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #50 on: June 10, 2009, 13:48:23 »
Alright, I would like to know what the best backpack is out there that is about 70-80L for no more than 250$ but cheaper and price for value would be better.
A prisoner of war is a man who tries to kill you and fails, and then asks you not to kill him
Play the game for more than you can afford to lose... only then will you learn the game.
Winston Churchill

Offline Kat Stevens

    beth am dyrnu braf yn y gwddf?

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 194,250
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,363
  • that's how we roll in redneck land
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #51 on: June 10, 2009, 14:11:25 »
What colour would you like? 
Apparently, a "USUAL SUSPECT"

“In peace there's nothing so becomes a man as modest stillness and humility; but when the blast of war blows in our ears, then imitate the action of the tiger; stiffen the sinews, summon up the blood, disguise fair nature with hard-favor'd rage.”

 Every normal man must be tempted at times to spit on his hands, hoist the black flag, and start slitting throats

Offline Bzzliteyr

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 49,595
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,973
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #52 on: June 10, 2009, 14:18:51 »
Seriously, that has got to be the toughest question to have asked.

You have to go and try out pack for yourself.  What might work for one person migh tnot work for the next.  If you have a camping gear store near you, I would recommend going in with a price range and trying out bags.  Most "good" stores will have gear you can fill the bag with to simulate a full bag for confort.

Good luck.
Adsum

UNPROFOR, CPSM, Canadian Forces Commander Land Force Command Commendation (Bosnia 1993), Canadian Decoration, General Campaign Star - ISAF

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #53 on: June 10, 2009, 15:04:15 »
My suggestion is to hit Kijiji and local gear swaps, that's pretty lowball price to me.

Personally, good gear makes good sense and for something like a pack which I would expect to last me ten years plus I am willing to spend another 150 dollars on it. Think of how that extra investment related over ten years compared to the two or three that another, cheaper pack might last. And another point, you can't put a dollar amount on sweat and blisters made by cheap gear, been there, it sucks.

And an update for the mountain bikers and hikers here: Tuonela has now gone to a year round resort www.tuonelawildernessresort.com and is well worth a visit for anyone down in this area. Chris, Anni and Matt will take very good care of you and give you a real education on being eco friendly.
« Last Edit: June 10, 2009, 15:16:36 by Scott »
Be nice for no reason.

Offline Rinker

  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • 1,450
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 88
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #54 on: June 10, 2009, 22:05:42 »
Well thanks Kat.

I have just had a bad expierence with high quality packs before. And do not want to go through it again. As for local gear swaps where I live, not gonna happen. But it is a good idea. Maybe someone could point me in the direction of a decent company?
A prisoner of war is a man who tries to kill you and fails, and then asks you not to kill him
Play the game for more than you can afford to lose... only then will you learn the game.
Winston Churchill

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #55 on: June 11, 2009, 09:20:15 »
MEC is your friend. So is google, for that matter.

Be nice for no reason.

Offline The Crowe

    Sushi out the arse.

  • Albainn Gu Brath!
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 2,747
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 276
  • Just some guy.
    • Daniel MacEnchroe
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #56 on: April 08, 2010, 14:20:03 »
Cheers to everyone in this thread!

Very useful links/tips for my upcoming venture in Algonquin!
Ex-CI of A&SH of C (PL) 2347 RC(Army)CC (2010-2011)
Ex-RSM of A&SH of C (PL) 2347 RC(Army)CC (2002-2008)

http://www.macenchroe.com

Offline Spectrum

  • I'm from the government; I'm here to help you
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 49,035
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,258
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #57 on: May 01, 2010, 14:25:29 »
Just wondering if anyone could suggest some good low cut hiking shoes or trail runners? I'm looking for something durable but not too cumbersome.

I have a Merrell day pack that refuses to quit after 4 or so years of abuse, so I think I may take a serious look at their shoes. Anyone have experience (or know someone) that has used a variation of the Merrell Intercept?

Thanks.
« Last Edit: May 01, 2010, 14:33:15 by popnfresh »

Offline Jc066

  • Guest
  • *
  • 545
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 22
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #58 on: May 01, 2010, 15:57:10 »
I know what i can recomend you don't get...Salomon trail runners. I got mine from MEC at a good price. They lasted a year and the fell apart...really, the stiching came out, the fabric fell apart, laces broke, etc. I wasn't a huge user of them but really? A F****ING Year!?

Hi-Tech always makes good products. Try them.

JC
Let's all work together and help stamp out Fixed wing!

Offline Spectrum

  • I'm from the government; I'm here to help you
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 49,035
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,258
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #59 on: May 02, 2010, 17:00:15 »
Thanks JC. I will see if they have anything that I like.

I had found a pair of Merrells that I was going to pick up today, but the store clerk told me that there was nothing in my size, and that the model was probably going out of production.  Back to the search!

 >:(

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #60 on: May 03, 2010, 10:55:31 »
Seconded WRT Solomon trail shoes. The lacing system is unique and great for a kickaround shoe but they do not belong on the trail unless you have funds to replace them every six months. Personally, I would not buy aything without a Vibram sole.

I am partial to Garmont, Asolo, Berghaus, for what it's worth.

Be nice for no reason.

Offline Spectrum

  • I'm from the government; I'm here to help you
  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 49,035
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,258
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #61 on: May 30, 2010, 18:56:42 »
I did indeed go for a pair with Vibram soles.

For anyone interested, I picked up the Merrell "Ottawa" model. Ultra light weight and breathable.

Offline 0tto Destruct

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 9,271
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 444
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #62 on: October 01, 2010, 09:11:15 »
I own a pair of MEC Kootenay 5's which I've put through the ringer and have come through like a champ. I wish I could do my BFTs with them. Normally, I loathe goretex footwear. A good leather pair of boots, properly looked after (SnoSeal is amazing), won't get wet easily. If they do, they're not difficult to dry out. In my experience, GoreTex boots are great for rainy days at the range, but once they get wet (and they will eventually) you can't really dry them out in the field. That said, I picked up a pair of North Face Assailant GTX hiking shoes on the recommendation from a friend, and they're amazing. We had a pretty bad heat/humidity spell in Halifax about a month ago, and even with the temps up in the 40s with the humidity, my feet weren't (too) overheated.

Since folks have been posting their gear, here's my collection

Packs: Gregory Whitney (Decent enough pack, but I get wicked hip hickeys with them...I'm looking to get a new one eventually). I use an Arc'teryx Bora 35 for day hikes, but I'll be replacing it soon.
Sleeping: Snugpak Softie 3 Merlin, MEC fleece liner, silk liner (I had to sew in a bunch of diced up shoelaces to link everything together), Thermarest Prolite 3,  inflatable pillow with Thermarest microfleece pillow case
Tent: I have a Marmot Limelight 3P for camping with the Missus. It replaced our well-worn NF Rock 22 (and is the same weight!). When I'm out by myself, I have a Hennessy Exped A-Sym hammock. (fantastic piece of kit...if you have back problems you'll never willingly sleep in a tent again. If the thing held two and 9D allowed it I'd ditch our bed at home and use this instead)
Water: Katadyn Combi water filter, MSR Dromedary 4L bag. I really like the dromedarys over a normal bladder. You can hook a hose to it, but it has a cap/spigot so you can hang it up once you get to your camp site and use it as a general water source for camp use. It even has a shower attachment!
Nav: Garmin 60CSx, Suunto MC-2 Global compass
Sharp things: Gransfors Small Forest Axe (I'm a bit if a Ray Mears fan...this thing is the BMW of camp axes), Bahco Laplander folding saw (cuts like a lightsabre), Fallkniven F1 Bushcraft knife, Swiss Army One-Hand Trekker.
Cooking: GSI anodized aluminium pot set, MSR Windpro stove, assorted MEC/MSR plates/bowels.
Snivel Kit: UCO Candle lantern, WalkStool folding stool, MEC Sil/Nylon Scout Tarp (used with some custom shockcord bungies I had made 11 years ago at the Halifax Trail Shop for my groundsheet), Black Diamond trekking poles (picked up at a MEC gear swap for 10 bucks 5 years ago...still work fine), Softie jacket.
Clothes: Most of what I use for hiking/camping is from MEC, they make pretty bombproof stuff.

Thats about it for the most part. Anyone else willing to post their camping setup?

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #63 on: October 03, 2010, 11:12:41 »
My setup hasn't changed much.

I did get a waterproof jacket, Arc'teryx. She's a shell, no liner, cause I like to layer rather than have a 3 in 1 system or whatever. But the thing keeps me dry in the worst. I've got some Patagonia fleece for underneath and I also dig plain old wool. Buying pants is a pain in the *** for me but I did get Patagonia Alpine Guide pants and think they rock.

I am still rocking the MSR Elbow Room 2 tent even after almost having it destroyed by Les Suetes last May and we're going to give it a bit more of a tird season look next weekend when we hit Pollett's Cove. Aside from the wind damage, which could have been avoidable, that thing has been bombproof for us although it is a little heavy. 9er does want me to get a new one though, more vestibule space wanted and side entry plus a little more headroom.

I've got to pick her up some poles this week and will likely stick with Black Diamond because the ones I have are awesome. I use them for hiking, skiing, snowshoeing...

This will be my first visit to MEC in 8 months and I am seriously jonesing for it. Also curious to see what the former TAO did with their new space downtown! I am in the city all week so my debit card might take a beating for gear...
Be nice for no reason.

Offline 0tto Destruct

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 9,271
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 444
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #64 on: October 05, 2010, 14:24:41 »
I'm looking to pick up an Arc'teryx shell when my MEC one dies on me.

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #65 on: October 05, 2010, 16:59:45 »
I am not sure which shell I have but it's freaking awesome. It's cut to be shorter in the front/longer in the back to aid in comfort. Likely not the best for schussing through five foot deep powder at Marmot but I don't plan to do that anyway. It was pricey though, anything GoreTex AND arc'teryx runs stupid.

I am now pricing out telly gear. Thankfully one of my coworkers is a former British national ski coach and called his buddy with Solomon for a favour. Sweeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeet.
Be nice for no reason.

Offline The Crowe

    Sushi out the arse.

  • Albainn Gu Brath!
  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 2,747
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 276
  • Just some guy.
    • Daniel MacEnchroe
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #66 on: December 15, 2010, 18:37:03 »
Any opinions on Columbia shells? I've been hunting around and I like the fit of the Columbia best - But I have no experience with their gear! Their water resistant stuff comfortable/work?
Ex-CI of A&SH of C (PL) 2347 RC(Army)CC (2010-2011)
Ex-RSM of A&SH of C (PL) 2347 RC(Army)CC (2002-2008)

http://www.macenchroe.com

Offline 0tto Destruct

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 9,271
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 444
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #67 on: December 15, 2010, 22:10:41 »
Finally settled on an Arc'teryx Beta AR. Pricey, but worth it. Excellent rain shell, and packs down to nothing.

Now, if I can just get one of the new issued rain jackets. As a reserve unit directly falling under LFAA, we were the last to get the new kit, and by then a lot of the more common sizes were out of stock.

Offline AGame

  • Guest
  • *
  • 110
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 6
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #68 on: September 27, 2011, 11:55:39 »

The stove I went with is an MSR Whisperlite Internationale. NOTE: There is a simple old Whisperlite model available which is one of the most popular selling stoves ever - the difference between this and the Internationale is that the Internationale will burn various different fuels. I believe that the price difference is about ten bucks and I thought better to have and not need than need and not have. About the stove? Backcountry gourmet's need back away! This thing boils water and that is about it! With some learning one can develop skills with simmer control but it's hard. It's pretty decent on fuel in my experience and boils water in about three minutes when you use the included heat shield. It's also very quiet in comparison to some of the other MSR stoves and it's really easy to light and holds flame in the wind with the shield.. Now, there is much debate about whether someone should go with a liquid fuel or LPG stove, here is my stance, take it for what it's worth: LPG stoves are only three season pieces as they do not work well in cold temperatures. As well, you have to pack more things, fuel cells and you have to get the empty ones back out. With liquid fuel you can have the thing work like a charm in arctic conditions (ask me, I know!) and the refillable fuel bottles eliminate the need to dispose of fuel cells.



I have the MSR Whiperlite Intl and it rocks. Great quality and it is easy to get going. I usually just use white gas in it, but I like the fact that it's versatile. 
Get your game face on.

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #69 on: September 27, 2011, 14:19:09 »

I have the MSR Whiperlite Intl and it rocks. Great quality and it is easy to get going. I usually just use white gas in it, but I like the fact that it's versatile. 

Agreed. I normally use white gas as well (Canadian Tire loves me)

This thing is still as bombproof as ever and worked well during a backcountry canoe/portage trip I did earlier this year and also cooked Thanksgiving dinner for us last year.

However, I am now thinking of an MSR Dragonfly because, since I am now married and obliged to take her along from time to time, I have to quit eating freeze dried stuff (even if I go for the more gourmet Harvest Foodworks stuff). Like any piece of kit the Whisperlite has its place and will always find a home in my pack when I need to save space/weight and when I do not care what I eat.

My buddy and I are in the process of planning a rather huge canoe trip for spring 13 and we need to start dialing in gear now. So watch for updates!
Be nice for no reason.

Offline Eye In The Sky

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 177,815
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,422
    • VP INTERNATIONAL
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #70 on: January 03, 2012, 02:08:45 »
Has anyone seen the new MSR Whisperlite Universal yet?

I like the idea/concept of it, but was wondering if anyone has actually had "hands on" one of these yet; the MSR video is "advertising" vice a review to me.  I was thinking of adding one to my gear, I just have a PocketRocket w/canister stand (use the Primus PowerGas/4 season canisters).

I'm itchin for a free weekend and some snow, I've got a pair of Atlas 1035s, OR Croc's, a new GSI Pinnicale Dualist set and other stuff to break in...if we could get some freakin' snow here.
The only time you have too much gas is when you're on fire.

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #71 on: January 03, 2012, 02:28:03 »
I like the concept as well but it looks like a lot of parts...

The Whisperlite International, while unable to burn with canisters, can burn just about anything else your heart desires with no change of parts, just a good cleaning or shake every now and then.

The new leg design would also have me asking some questions. I mean, why med with (near) perfection?

Then again, I don't use canister stoves at all...for the simple reason that I have one stove, one set of bottles, one set of tools (packed with the stove). I do see where a canister stove would be ideal for day trips or ultra light stuff when you want to save weight, but to me the weight is negligible if you're going for a day or ultra light as you're only really adding the weight of the liquid. Anyway.

My good friend, a die hard canister type, is always after me to at least try the alternative and she usually wins the argument - when the temps are above 5c. When a load of us hit Pollett's Cove a couple of Thanksgivings ago it was the Whisperlite that won out because of cooler air temps. I never have to worry about calculating fuel consumption based on a met rep.

All of this said, I do not want to be seen as ******** on the new design as I do think it'll find it's niche.
Be nice for no reason.

Offline Eye In The Sky

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 177,815
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,422
    • VP INTERNATIONAL
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #72 on: January 03, 2012, 03:04:36 »
The Whisperlite International, while unable to burn with canisters, can burn just about anything else your heart desires with no change of parts, just a good cleaning or shake every now and then.

Thats the other one I was looking at.  The Universal isn't showing on MSR's site yet, or MEC but I did read it was going to list at $131. 

Quote
The new leg design would also have me asking some questions. I mean, why med with (near) perfection?

Its very similar to the Simmerlite/WindPro design, I thought.  Maybe its "improved" because the word "improved" helps sell stuff?

Quote
Then again, I don't use canister stoves at all...for the simple reason that I have one stove, one set of bottles, one set of tools (packed with the stove). I do see where a canister stove would be ideal for day trips or ultra light stuff when you want to save weight, but to me the weight is negligible if you're going for a day or ultra light as you're only really adding the weight of the liquid. Anyway.

I have my PocketRocket as a 3-season and intended it as a 'just in case' for winter day-trips, (I liked the price, weight and size).  But I've started to question that choice given the issues with canisters in cold temps.  Not sure you want your "just in case I get injured/lost/etc" stove in wintertime to not work well in cold temps.  I was planning on getting the International, then heard of the Universal.   

Quote
My good friend, a die hard canister type, is always after me to at least try the alternative and she usually wins the argument - when the temps are above 5c. When a load of us hit Pollett's Cove a couple of Thanksgivings ago it was the Whisperlite that won out because of cooler air temps. I never have to worry about calculating fuel consumption based on a met rep.

I tend to be a die hard "what will work when I really need it to" type myself.   ;D

I like your point on "too many parts"...parts are hard to find in the mud/dark/snow.  Also read a discussion on one site about the change from a Philips to Allen head on the burner screw and a lot of other talk about things I am not up to speed on WRT to Whisperlites.
The only time you have too much gas is when you're on fire.

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #73 on: January 03, 2012, 03:41:06 »
Thats the other one I was looking at.  The Universal isn't showing on MSR's site yet, or MEC but I did read it was going to list at $131. 

That seems pricey for a stove with no simmer capability. The Dragon Fly, another reputed King of stoves, lists at about 120 bucks right now. I am betting that their targets are the expedition types (which will either love or hate it) and the casuals, who might be inclined to buy because of the 'all-in-one' feel to it.

I wonder if this "redesign" is not a complete overhaul of the International. I do not see the International on MEC's website any longer.

Quote
Its very similar to the Simmerlite/WindPro design, I thought.  Maybe its "improved" because the word "improved" helps sell stuff?

This might be the key to my last question/statement.

I am sure the casuals might be affected by the wording used but anyone else with even limited experience on MSR gear should know what's what because they are that bombproof and simple to operate/maintain.

Quote
I have my PocketRocket as a 3-season and intended it as a 'just in case' for winter day-trips, (I liked the price, weight and size).  But I've started to question that choice given the issues with canisters in cold temps.  Not sure you want your "just in case I get injured/lost/etc" stove in wintertime to not work well in cold temps.  I was planning on getting the International, then heard of the Universal.   

Unless you plan to leave North America for uber long treks I would go with the simple Whisperlite (~80 bucks) which should save you, IIRC, 15 dollars over the International. The only difference is in the jet design with the International allowing the 'any fuel' capability. Aside from my trip to the desert in 2008 and some demos for friends mine has only ever burned white gas. And what you get is one of the single most proven stoves to ever hit the market.

I would never trust a canister stove for emergency use. Ever. But that's me. There's also the pack in/out issue that comes with longer trips with is why I prefer the liquid fuel stove. You can also find calculations based on air temp that will give you the amount you should need - I ignore that and go, as I said, with two jugs, always. It's only ~600 ml more. I can get at least three full days out of one bottle and that's being pretty liberal with my use of fuel.

Quote
I tend to be a die hard "what will work when I really need it to" type myself.   ;D

You sound like a Whisperlite guy. Seriously, imagine fixing something by shaking it violently much like a caveman might - you have the Whisperlite.

Quote
I like your point on "too many parts"...parts are hard to find in the mud/dark/snow.  Also read a discussion on one site about the change from a Philips to Allen head on the burner screw and a lot of other talk about things I am not up to speed on WRT to Whisperlites.

They must be using a stock photo of the burner then, because I see a Phillips in the shots I have viewed. I imagine a change to Allen heads would be because of the Phillips having been stripped by over eager users, it happens. It's not hard to tape a certain sized Allen key to your multi tool but you are completely ****ed if you lose it when you need it. The thing about doing anything in the back country, at least to me, is to be a complete minimalist so far as what you might need to fix something that breaks. I also prefer to use kit that can be fixed by semi-numb fingers, not something that requires much dexterity.

I am trying to picture the bag my Whisperlite comes in (I am in the UK right now or I'd go look)...about the size of a softball, it has the windshield, lube, maintenance tool and spare jet in it. Full repair kits are available for about 20 bucks though I have never bothered. I might now that the stove is a little older. Weight is about half a kilo. You can also buy snow plates for them and other bits of kit but I have found that I don't need much with it. I shake mine for about 15 seconds before every use.

If it were me...I would buy the Whisperlite and spend the spare cash on a maintenance kit and a spare pump. You have to buy cylinders plus fuel or canisters anyway so I consider that to balance out. If you want a little more for options in cooking then I'd go with the Dragon Fly and same accessories.

I can't tell people enough: the one drawback to any Whisperlite is that it has two settings - off and nuclear. My friend who constantly bleats about her canister stove always gets me there.
Be nice for no reason.

Offline Scott

    - apparently an antagonist.

  • Likes fire and loud noises.
  • Chief of Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 179,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 7,437
  • El Scorcho Diablo
Re: Outdoor Gear Thread
« Reply #74 on: January 03, 2012, 04:38:10 »
I just read back through the thread and see that it's time for an update as well.

MEC's "Rock Solid Guarantee" came through for me when my wife and I were blown off of the beach at La Bloque thus shredding a bit of the tent and snapping two poles. Replacement pole sections, silly string, new ends all for free. Plus some dubious looks when they were told we did in fact survive the gale - though we haven't found my thermarest. It was doing mach 3 south the last time I saw it. Anyway, they were willing to replace it for me had repairs been ineffective but luckily, or unluckily I guess, we got it fixed.

We are going to replace the old Elbow Room eventually because my wife and I are both 5'10" tall and it's a pain in the arse for the two of us to try to occupy that space when getting in or out. I am certain we'll either see another MSR (Hubba Hubba me likey) or go with one of the MEC products. To be honest, in retrospect, the Elbow Room tent really was only good for one and I am glad they have discontinued it.

After helping to write a canoe booklet on inland canoe routes of Nova Scotia, the project manager awarded all of us with Redtail Paddles. I had used his the weekend before during a midnight paddle around Keji and was thoroughly impressed. I have always been a die hard Canadian Tire "Field and Stream" type and the aforementioned booklet pays homage to the one I snapped about ten minutes into our trek - but the Redtail has me in love. My busy also gave me a decorated one as a wedding present...which will have me feeling guilty if I ever allow my wife to get it wet!

I bought a dehydrator and a vacuum sealer and have been having a blast making jerky for treks as well as freezing some meals then sealing them for trail use. I have gone mostly away from anything freeze dried because my wife isn't a huge fan of them and it's pointless packing two separate meal sets. Plus the stuff you make yourself is better for you, and cheaper by far. There are a few recipes that we use almost exclusively due to the ease of freezability and re-heatability, which is probably the most important thing to consider.

I have also changed out water footwear to Keen Newport's which are great but do need some design changes (and I have seen that they are afoot) due to the stitching around the heel strap blowing out. No matter the problems, these shoes are far superior to the old Merrell's I had and I have actually been avoiding anything put out by them of late.

Light trail wear sees me sporting the Keen Targhee II's which have, so far, been the best light shoes I have ever owned, and I have owned several others like Columbia, Solomon, North Face, Merrell, Asolo and Garmont (although if I ever see the right pair of Garmonts at the right time again I would buy them). Wit the Keens I have had to apply some crazy glue to a couple of parts of the soles due to them separating but I do wear these as everyday shoes and they are over a year old. The soles have worn well despite not being Vibram (which I would prefer) an the only negative I could offer is that mine do not seem to wear well with a thinner sock which will allow heel movement. It's caused a little hole in each of the heels but nothing major, just the inner liner.

Here's a link to the booklet we wrote. 10 authors, 17 routes. Mine was the Tangier Grand - read all a bout it, that'll save me clacking it out for you here! For those in the NS area, we are planning more projects for the future...just no idea what they will be as we are still processing feedback from this one.

Online "magazine" version: http://issuu.com/pollutiondesign/docs/nova_scotia_canoe_routes_

PDF Version: http://www.ckns.ca/index.php?option=com_docman&task=cat_view&gid=36&Itemid=59 Click on "NS Canoe Route Book"

The booklet is free for distribution so feel free to share! Any feedback please hit the email listed in the booklet or hit me here.

Happy trails.
« Last Edit: January 03, 2012, 06:43:03 by Scott »
Be nice for no reason.