Author Topic: USAF Woes  (Read 97939 times)

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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #275 on: May 31, 2017, 22:20:35 »
 The Air Force is bringing back into service 8 C5M's over 4 years.I suspect that these numbers could increase as needed.

http://www.popularmechanics.com/military/aviation/a26716/air-force-reactivating-c-5-galaxy/

The U.S. Air Force is bringing back C-5M Super Galaxy transports recently mothballed due to budget cuts. The gigantic planes, sent to an early retirement in a cost-cutting move, are being brought back as money flows back into the service's coffers. The C-5M's range, greater than any other air transport, is a key factor.

The C-5 Galaxy was originally introduced in the late 1960s as a strategic airlifter able to cross entire oceans without refueling. The C-5 is the largest airlifter built by the United States, 65 feet high and with a wingspan of 247 feet. It can carry a maximum of 135 tons of cargo. With a combat load of sixty tons of cargo, the C-5M can fly from Dover Air Force Base in Delaware to Incirlik Air Force Base, Turkey nonstop without refueling. According to the Air Force, it can fly 7,000 miles without cargo.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #276 on: August 02, 2017, 16:47:40 »
Dealing with pilot probs:

Quote
Air Force Gets Creative to Tackle Pilot Shortage

The Air Force's pilot shortage has leaders worried not only about filling gaps in the immediate future, but also how the military and civilian airlines may suffer without fine-tuned aviators in decades to come.

As a result, Air Mobility Command at Scott Air Force Base, Illinois, if given permission, may start a small group tryout for pilots testing a new program in which aviators stay at their home-duty stations longer, thus increasing their longevity and likelihood to stay in service, the head of the command told Military.com in an exclusive interview.

"Should we go with a 'fly-only' track?" Gen. Carlton Everhart II said in an interview Wednesday.

Everhart said he envisions something like this: "You stay with me for 20 years, and I let you fly. You … could maybe [make] lieutenant colonel, but you may not make higher than that.

"Then, [we] allow you to stay at your home station for three to four years instead of two to three, so you can get some longevity," he continued. "Then, it's not just [flying airlift cargo or tanker planes]. You could go to [Air Education and Training Command] and help out there for three to four years to help bring on new pilots.

"To sweeten the deal, as you come into your career, maybe in the last four years, we allow you on a 'dream sheet' to put your top three choices, try to get you moved to there so you can establish your family and where you want to retire," he said.

Everhart said the 'fly-only' effort would still encompass wing, squadron and group duties and deployments but -- bottom line -- "it's longevity."

The same aviator retention bonuses would also apply, he said...
http://www.military.com/daily-news/2017/07/30/air-force-gets-creative-to-tackle-pilot-shortage.html

Mark
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Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.

Offline SeaKingTacco

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Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #277 on: August 02, 2017, 16:59:07 »
What? Actually employing expensively trained pilots in the cockpit?

Madness.

That is no way to run a military bureaucracy....

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: USAF Woes
« Reply #278 on: August 26, 2017, 12:52:30 »
More on pilot probs:

Quote
Airlines Step Up Hiring So Air Force Boosts Retention Pay

Eager to stem the flow of Air Force pilots chasing bigger paychecks and cushier gigs with America’s airlines, Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson announced today [Aug. 25] the service is increasing what used to be called flight pay for the first time since 1999.

US airlines hired 4,000 pilots last year, many of them former military pilots. Wilson said officers will now get $1,000 a month, up from $850 and enlisted will get $600 up from $400 a month. It looks as if the pay is going up because the Air Force just isn’t retaining as many pilots as it had expected to. The service, Wilson said. will also try to recruit up to 25 former military pilots for one-year contracts to serve on critical rated staff positions. Many staff jobs require rated pilots to understand the technicalities they deal with.

Wilson also named Brig. Gen. Michael G. Koscheski as head of the Aircrew Crisis Task Force. Assigning a general officer is an indication, along with the task force’s name, that the Air Force is beginning to get really worried about pilot retention and that the effort needs clearer focus.

Intriguingly, Wilson said the service’s attempts to improve drone pilot retention were on track and that no new measures were needed...
http://breakingdefense.com/2017/08/airlines-step-up-hiring-so-air-force-boosts-retention-pay/

Mark
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Ça explique, mais ça n'excuse pas.