Author Topic: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’  (Read 1502 times)

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Offline Baden Guy

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At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« on: October 12, 2018, 14:45:48 »
A Fighter Jet Flipped. Hangars Shredded. At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’

As Hurricane Michael tore across the Florida Panhandle on Wednesday, shredding buildings and homes in its path, the mostly empty Tyndall Air Force Base braced for a ferocious impact.

A wind gauge surged to 130 miles per hour, and then broke. Hangars where Air Force jets have sheltered during past tropical storms began to groan and shudder before being ripped to ribbons.

The eye of the storm cut directly over the base, which sits on a narrow spit of land that juts into the Gulf of Mexico, about a dozen miles south of Panama City. Trees bent in the howling wind, then splintered. Stormproof roofs only a few months old peeled like old paint and were scraped away by the gale. An F-15 fighter jet on display at the base entrance was ripped from its foundation and pitched onto its back amid twisted flagpoles and uprooted trees.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/11/us/air-force-hurricane-michael-damage.html?action=click&module=Spotlight&pgtype=Homepage

We used to fly our Voodoo's from Chatham down to Tyndall for training.
It was a lovely base located on the Gulf. Will be interesting to see how the USAF responds to such a level of damage.


Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #1 on: October 12, 2018, 14:54:51 »
More:

Quote
F-22s, QF-16 likely damaged after Tyndall hangars hit by hurricane

The Air Force said Friday [Oct. 12] that an unspecified number of aircraft left inside hangars at Tyndall Air Force Base in Florida were likely damaged when Hurricane Michael devastated the base, with imagery on social media showing an unknown number of F-22 Raptors are among those impacted.

Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said in an email that some aircraft were left in Tyndall’s hangars due to maintenance or safety reasons, and all of those hangars were damaged when the Category 4 storm pounded the Gulf Coast Wednesday.

“We anticipate the aircraft parked inside may be damaged as well, but we won’t know the extent until our crews can safely enter those hangars and make an assessment,” Stefanek said. The Air Force was unable to say how many aircraft, and which air frames, were left behind.

However, according to the Facebook Air Force Forum page, four F-22 Raptors from the 43rd Fighter Squadron were unable to fly out of the way of the storm and may have been damaged. Three Raptors were in one hangar that had significant damage, according to the forum, and a fourth rode out the storm in a separate hangar that seemed to sustain less damage, based on imagery on the forum. The Air Force would not confirm that the F-22s were damaged in the storm [emphasis added]....


U.S. government satellite imagery from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows the extent of the damage at Tyndall Air Force Base. The base is just east of Panama City, Florida, which took a direct hit from Hurricane Michael. Credit: NOAA
https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2018/10/12/f-22s-qf-16-likely-damaged-after-tyndall-hangars-hit-by-hurricane/

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #2 on: October 12, 2018, 15:11:45 »
Tweet:
https://twitter.com/CanadianForces/status/1050771558611017728

Quote
Canadian Forces
‏Verified account @CanadianForces

Our thoughts go out to our CAF members and their families, as well as the U.S. servicemen and women stationed at Tyndall Air Force Base and all others impacted by the devastating effects of Hurricane Michael. Stay safe and strong - your Forces will support you in the recovery.
11:33 AM - 12 Oct 2018

Mark
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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #3 on: October 12, 2018, 15:38:46 »
To the rescue:

Quote
Special Tactics Airmen open Tyndall AFB airfield for operations

HURLBURT FIELD, Fla. (AFNS) -- Air Force Special Tactics Airmen with the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron assessed, opened and controlled air traffic at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida, Oct. 11.

The Special Tactics Airmen cleared and established a runway at Oct. 11, at 7 p.m., and received the first aircraft at 7:06 p.m.

Special Tactics Airmen have the ability to assess, open and control major airfields to clandestine dirt strips in any environment, including those that have been impacted by a natural disaster.

Special Tactics Airmen are in control of the airfield and are prepared to support airfield operations until further notice, which will allow support to facilitate humanitarian assistance to Tyndall AFB.

Tyndall AFB received extensive damage in the wake of Hurricane Michael.

For any questions regarding Special Tactics Airmen, contact Jackie Pienkowski at 850-884-3902 or 413-237-4466, or jaclyn.pienkowski@us.af.mil.


Special Tactics Airmen with the 23rd Special Tactics Squadron load water onto a CV-22 Osprey assigned to the 8th Special Operations Squadron at Hurlburt Field, Fla., Oct. 11, 2018. Special Tactics are prepared to assess, open and control major airfields to provide support during humanitarian operations. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Joseph Pick)
https://www.af.mil/News/Article-Display/Article/1660634/special-tactics-airmen-open-tyndall-afb-airfield-for-operations/source/GovD/

Mark
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #4 on: October 12, 2018, 16:33:59 »
Another reason to reopen the F22 production line.

Offline tomahawk6

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #5 on: October 12, 2018, 16:46:18 »
The base seems to have had no casualties thankfully.I include the link yo the base web site. This will require a funding increase to rebuild or the USAF could shut it down and consolidate at other area bases. 


https://www.tyndall.af.mil/Hurricane/

Oct. 11, 2018: 5:40 p.m.:

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE 5 p.m. UPDATE: Tyndall Air Force Base leadership just conducted its first aerial assessment of the base. We are grateful that Tyndall has had no reported injuries or fatalities. Damage across the base is extensive.
 
Here are some highlights; all base houses sustained significant roof and siding damage. Some houses sustained more significant structural failures.
 
Some Tyndall dorms appear to have fared well; others sustained severe damage.
 
The flight line is devastated. Every building has severe damage. Many buildings are a complete loss.
 
The hurricane completely destroyed the Tyndall marina. The structures and docks are gone.
 
The drone runway, AFCEC labs, and Silver Flag areas all sustained catastrophic damage. Tyndall Elementary School sustained severe damage.
 
The BX and commissary sustained severe damage, and the two shoppettes sustained catastrophic damage.
 
Help is on the way. Initial relief and support requested by the ride out team, is due to arrive as early as this evening. Air Force and government officials have responded quickly to our requests.
 
The base remains closed. Trees and power lines block nearly every road. At this time, power and basic utilities remain out.
 
Base leaders will continue to provide regular updates as the base begins the long road to recovery. Thank you for your continued patience.



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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #6 on: October 12, 2018, 16:49:08 »
That's too bad. I deployed to Tyndall a few times way back when and always had a great time there and amazing support from my US counterparts. I'm sure it'll be back better than ever.
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #7 on: October 12, 2018, 16:56:03 »
While it is a necessary space operations site I think it will be cheaper to consolidate. As I suspected the base had been evacuated prior to the storm much like the Navy puts ships in port out to sea.

https://www.businessinsider.com/us-military-installations-are-prepping-for-hurricane-michael-2018-10



Offline SupersonicMax

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #8 on: October 12, 2018, 18:29:53 »
Homestead AFB was killed by a tornado years ago.  I wouldn't be surprised if the base moves assets elsewhere (Eglin?)

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #9 on: October 13, 2018, 02:00:37 »
The USAF has no shortage of air bases they could consolidate at. There are 21 military bases in Florida is it the usually nice warm weather ?

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #10 on: October 13, 2018, 03:47:26 »
I'm curious why they didn't evac high-price assets from a storm of that strength.  I've been on US bases and evac'd for similar events(more than once from the same storm when the track changed).  Everything that didn't have a hanger left the ramp and a few other...assets.  I guess they thought the hangers/HASs would hold up to the test?
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Offline Baz

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #11 on: October 13, 2018, 06:47:49 »
Homestead AFB was killed by a tornado years ago.  I wouldn't be surprised if the base moves assets elsewhere (Eglin?)

It was Hurricane Andrew in 1992.

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #12 on: October 13, 2018, 06:49:31 »
I'm curious why they didn't evac high-price assets from a storm of that strength.  I've been on US bases and evac'd for similar events(more than once from the same storm when the track changed).  Everything that didn't have a hanger left the ramp and a few other...assets.  I guess they thought the hangers/HASs would hold up to the test?

They did; from above "Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said in an email that some aircraft were left in Tyndall’s hangars due to maintenance or safety reasons, and all of those hangars were damaged when the Category 4 storm pounded the Gulf Coast Wednesday."

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #13 on: October 13, 2018, 08:28:03 »
copy, tks.   
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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #14 on: October 13, 2018, 16:55:08 »
Yikes!

Quote
Tyndall F-22s, Left Behind Before Michael Hit, Possibly Damaged Beyond Repair



More than a dozen F-22s were left behind as Hurricane Michael bore down on the base Oct. 10. Now, in Michael's wake, many of those are damaged, and some beyond repair, at a cost of more than $1 billion, Air Force officials said.

Chief of Staff Gen. David Goldfein canceled Friday afternoon meetings and was preparing to fly to Tyndall to personally assess damage to the base and the aircraft. Air Combat Command chief Gen. James “Mike” Holmes was also preparing to visit Tyndall.

The F-22s left behind could not fly for either mechanical or safety reasons, said a spokeswoman, who also said all the hangars on base were damaged. Aerial video showed roofs and siding torn apart by savage winds and some hangars suffered severe structural damage.

“We anticipate the aircraft parked inside may be damaged as well, but we won't know the extent until our crews can safely enter those hangars and make an assessment,” the spokeswoman said.

The loss is significant but not devastating. “The Air Force remains capable of executing its combat mission across the world with aircraft from other bases, as well as those that were evacuated from Tyndall in advance of the hurricane,” she said.

The storm caused “catastrophic damage” across Tyndall, with all buildings from the flight line and beyond damaged, and all base housing rendered unfit for occupancy. Wing Commander Col. Brian Laidlaw said in a statement Friday the base was “better than yesterday, and that is how it is going to continue to be. We will continue to persevere.” He called on airmen who had fled the base to go to their nearest military installation for medical help.

Air Force Personnel Centers at bases across the country have volunteered to assist as possible...
http://www.airforcemag.com/Features/Pages/2018/October%202018/Tyndall-F-22s-Left-Behind-Before-Michael-Hit-Possibly-Damaged-Beyond-Repair.aspx

Mark
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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #15 on: October 14, 2018, 12:17:26 »
Reality in face of fast-developing Hurricane (further links at original):

Quote
Setting The Record Straight On Why Fighter Jets Can't All Simply Fly Away To Escape Storms
Outrage over F-22s left behind at Tyndall AFB as Michael hit and statements saying they should have all been flown away are divorced from reality.

We have been leading the coverage on the state of aircraft left behind after Hurricane Michael made a direct strike on the highly important Tyndall Air Force Base. We have posted pictures showing QF-16s, Mu-2s, and yes, F-22s, sitting among the rubble inside badly damaged hangars at the base. The USAF has stated that aircraft were left behind, with unofficial figures being reported that range from three to 18 of the precious super fighters riding out the storm on site. Even though I repeatedly explained why not all aircraft can fly off in advance of a storm's arrival, I have been inundated with tweets, Facebook messages, emails, and comments ranging from people demanding to know how this could have happened to being outraged that the commanders at the base didn't see that all of the planes flew out and that they should face stiff punishments for their actions. Some even claimed they should have been flown out on transport planes. These are naive and in some cases absurd statements that are totally divorced from the reality of tactical jet operations. Here's why.

At modern fighter is not a Honda Accord. You don't just hop in it and drive it around for months until you finally have to take it for a one-hour oil change when the light comes on. If anything, they are far more akin to high-end sports cars that require a lot of expensive TLC to keep operating. The F-22, in particular, is more analogous to an exotic supercar or even a high-end race car than anything else. It requires dozens of hours of maintenance for every single flight hour and deep maintenance can take days or even many weeks to accomplish, depending on what is needed to be done and availability of spare parts, which can be scarce.

On top of some aircraft being sidelined for extended periods of time for repairs, others have to go through periodic planned servicing, discreet component inspections, and invasive phase inspections, the latter of which sees the aircraft largely disassembled before being arduously put back together and flight tested before returning it to the active flight line after all its issues, or 'gripes,' are worked out. In other words, many of these operations are not ones you can simply stop and reverse to rapidly generate the aircraft into a flying condition in a matter of a day or two—in some cases, not even close. There are always a number of aircraft going through these planned maintenance intervals, that way a squadron's inventory can remain fairly predictable given the demands being placed upon it. 

So it is not uncommon to have at least a handful of a unit's aircraft incapable of flying due to foreseen maintenance, let alone unforeseen issues. That number can actually grow higher based on the type, the age of the aircraft, and the general readiness status of the aircraft's community overall...

The F-22 fleet, in particular, sits at the lowest readiness rate across the USAF fast-jet inventory. There are a number of contributing factors to this, including the type's short production run that pretty much everyone regrets in hindsight. But as of 2017, the F-22 community as a whole struggled to meet a 50 percent mission capable rate. Their legacy fighter predecessors fared better at generally above 70 percent...
http://www.thedrive.com/the-war-zone/24204/setting-the-record-straight-on-why-fighter-jets-cant-all-simply-fly-away-to-escape-storms

Mark
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #16 on: October 15, 2018, 01:52:12 »
Northern Command Air Ops and North American Aerospace Command have been moved to Langley AFB in Va. 

https://www.stripes.com/news/northern-command-air-operations-center-moves-to-virginia-in-wake-of-hurricane-michael-1.551925

Offline Old Sweat

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #17 on: October 15, 2018, 07:07:43 »
The article suggest a NORAD regional centre has moved, not the command headquarters from Colorado Springs.

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2018, 07:27:03 »
I will note, the aircraft that was noted as having flipped over (visible in the 4 minute video that's circulating) is actually a gate sentry airplane - an F-15 at that.

I did a google-map look and found that aircraft with 3 others in a small park on the base.

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Re: At Tyndall Air Force Base, a ‘Complete Loss.’
« Reply #19 on: October 15, 2018, 16:07:16 »
Update:

Quote
Air Force: Hurricane damage to Tyndall F-22s ‘less than we feared,’ but unknown how many will fly again

After touring Tyndall Air Force Base Sunday, the Air Force’s top leaders said the F-22s that remained behind when Hurricane Michael struck were not as badly damaged as originally feared.

But more inspections of the advanced fighters still need to be done before the Air Force can tell whether some or all can be repaired and returned to the sky, said Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson, Chief of Staff Gen. Dave Goldfein, and Chief Master Sergeant of the Air Force Kaleth Wright in a statement Sunday evening.

It also remains unclear when the 11,000 Tyndall personnel who were ordered to evacuate a week ago will be able to return [emphasis added]...

“We also looked into each of the hangars that housed aircraft which weathered the storm for maintenance or safety reasons,” they said. “Visually, they were all intact and looked much better than expected considering the surrounding damage to some structures. Our maintenance professionals will do a detailed assessment of the F-22 Raptors and other aircraft before we can say with certainty that damaged aircraft can be repaired and sent back into the skies. However, damage was less than we feared and preliminary indications are promising.”

But the Air Force has so far refused to answer questions about how many Raptors may have been damaged [emphasis added].

...some of Tyndall’s F-22s — which initially evacuated to Wright-Patterson Air Force Base in Ohio — were moved to Joint Base Langley-Eustis in Virginia Sunday, where they could be worked on by maintainers from the 1st Fighter Wing...
https://www.airforcetimes.com/news/your-air-force/2018/10/15/air-force-hurricane-damage-to-tyndall-f-22s-less-than-we-feared-but-unknown-how-many-will-fly-again/

Official Tydall info here:
https://www.afpc.af.mil/Hurricane/

Mark
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