Author Topic: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia  (Read 2053 times)

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Online tomahawk6

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #25 on: October 01, 2019, 09:48:43 »
Saudi is more important to Japan, India and Europe for oil. Fortunately due to fracking the US is now self sufficient.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #26 on: October 01, 2019, 10:24:59 »
Saudi is more important to Japan, India and Europe for oil. Fortunately due to fracking the US is now self sufficient.

I think Saudi oil is still cheaper though, as it basically oozes out of the ground (Jed Clampett like) vs. having to spend alot of money to extract it.
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Online tomahawk6

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #27 on: October 01, 2019, 10:55:21 »
The US becoming energy self sufficient is a strategic issue. This way we lessen our need for middle east oil. We dont want to repeat Desert Storm if we can help it although it would require calling up the Guard and Reserves. We no longer have the men in uniform that we used to.

Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #28 on: October 01, 2019, 15:35:29 »
The US becoming energy self sufficient is a strategic issue. This way we lessen our need for middle east oil. We dont want to repeat Desert Storm if we can help it although it would require calling up the Guard and Reserves. We no longer have the men in uniform that we used to.


It is, indeed, but there are questions about how long the boom can last.  The US will be a net exporter in 2020, but for how long? The essential element of fracking is that oil is being extracted from "used" fields that had, already, been pumped dry by conventional means ... this is not "new" oil, it is the tail end of old, old fields. Thus for fracking has exceeded expectations, but will it last until 2030 or 2050? That's the strategic question.
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Offline Cloud Cover

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #29 on: October 01, 2019, 15:40:34 »
A change in political control could result in the cessation of fracking. After that, it’s bust and echo.
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Online tomahawk6

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #30 on: October 01, 2019, 16:19:04 »

It is, indeed, but there are questions about how long the boom can last.  The US will be a net exporter in 2020, but for how long? The essential element of fracking is that oil is being extracted from "used" fields that had, already, been pumped dry by conventional means ... this is not "new" oil, it is the tail end of old, old fields. Thus for fracking has exceeded expectations, but will it last until 2030 or 2050? That's the strategic question.


The US has huge energy reserves enough to last a couple of hundred years.

Offline E.R. Campbell

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Re: More US Forces to Saudi Arabia
« Reply #31 on: October 01, 2019, 18:29:52 »


The US has huge energy reserves enough to last a couple of hundred years.


Oh ... that's great, but the US Energy Information Administration says that the US has about 40 billion barrels in proven, recoverable oil reserves. Other sources say there are another 45+ billion barrels in other reserves, so far not proven. The USEIA also says that the US consumes 7.5 Billion barrels a year of petroleum products. Let's assume that that is 5 billion barrels of oil consumed a year and that there are 100 billion barrels of recoverable oil in the ground. If the US stops all oil imports, including from Canada, then it's reserves are good for what? 20 years?  :dunno:

Maybe my math is wrong, maybe the data is wrong. :dunno: But, as far as I can see, most sources agree that Venezuela has 300 billion barrels of proven reserves, Saudi Arabia has almost 270 billion barrels, Canada has 170 billion barrels and the USA has 40 billion barrels. So Canada has a century worth of oil in reserve, but the USA?

It is ill that men should kill one another in seditions, tumults and wars; but it is worse to bring nations to such misery, weakness and baseness
as to have neither strength nor courage to contend for anything; to have nothing left worth defending and to give the name of peace to desolation.
Algernon Sidney in Discourses Concerning Government, (1698)
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