Author Topic: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread  (Read 1286477 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3550 on: July 19, 2019, 13:55:32 »
Chicoms doing it to Aussies too--great kidnappers and a lovely bunch of people. And the fellow lived in the US:
Quote
Australia 'deeply disappointed' by detention of citizen in China

Canberra on Friday [July 19] said it was "deeply disappointed" with the criminal detention of an Australian-Chinese writer in China, demanding Beijing release him if he is being held for "his political views".

Foreign Minister Marise Payne said Australia had received confirmation Friday that Yang Henjun, held by Chinese authorities since January, had been transferred to criminal detention, apparently on national security grounds.

In a strongly worded statement, Payne said the government had raised Yang's case repeatedly with Beijing at senior levels and written twice to China's foreign minister requesting a "fair and transparent" resolution, as well as access to his lawyer.

"This has not occurred," Payne said.

"The government has expressed concern about Dr Yang’s welfare and the conditions under which he is held," she added.

Payne said she had still not received clarification as to why Yang, also known as Yang Jun, was being held.

"If he is being detained for his political views, then he should be released," she said.

The author and democracy advocate was detained had been held in a secret location since being detained in January shortly after making a rare return to China from his current residence in the United States.

The foreign ministry in Beijing said then he was suspected of endangering "China's national security" -- which often implies espionage allegations.

Until this week he was being held under "residential surveillance at a designated location" (RSDL), a form of detention that allows authorities to hold people for serious crimes.

Payne confirmed Friday that he had been transferred to a criminal detention centre.
https://www.afp.com/en/news/3954/australia-deeply-disappointed-detention-citizen-china-doc-1ix13h3

More detail at earlier story:

Quote
Yang Hengjun: Australian writer detained in China expected to be charged, lawyer says
Yang, who has been detained for six months, is expected to be charged with endangering national security
...
Yang, a Chinese public intellectual who has long advocated for democratic reforms in China, has been detained for the last six months in an unknown location in China...

Yang’s case could complicate already cooling ties between Australia and China, over concerns about potential Chinese interference in national affairs, Huawei and human rights...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2019/jul/18/yang-hengjun-australian-writer-detained-in-china-expected-to-be-charged-lawyer-says

Meanwhile that interference in Canada:

Quote
Falun Gong incident more reason Canada needs system to handle complaints of Chinese intimidation: Amnesty
Ottawa handles the issue with a scattershot approach that leaves possible victims unclear how to get help, Amnesty International's Canadian head says

The alleged harassment of a Falun Gong practitioner at Ottawa’s Dragon Boat Festival is one more reason the federal government needs dedicated officials to handle complaints of Chinese-government intimidation, says a prominent human-rights watchdog.

The incident involving practitioner Gerry Smith was “very troubling,” and part of a wider pattern of coercion by Beijing’s representatives, said Alex Neve, Canadian head of Amnesty International.

But Ottawa continues to handle the issue with a scattershot approach that leaves possible victims unclear how to get help, he said.

“When something happens, they don’t really know where should they turn to report this,” he said. “Is this a criminal law matter, is this a security and intelligence matter, is this just a diplomatic incident? Is it all of the above, is it none of the above?”

Neve said Amnesty has been urging federal authorities for some time to create a single point of contact for people and groups “who feel intimidated by Chinese government.”

Such a system would also help Ottawa track the extent of the problem, he said.

Smith says he briefly entered the festival grounds last month with the nine-year-old son of a friend, and was ordered to remove a T-shirt bearing the words Falun Dafa — another name for Falun Gong — by the festival’s CEO. He said John Brooman told him he didn’t want the event politicized, and mentioned that it was co-sponsored by the Chinese embassy. Brooman also threatened to remove a group of other Falun Gong followers doing exercises outside the festival in city-owned Mooney’s Bay park, Smith charges.

A city councillor said he also saw some Falun Gong supporters handing out leaflets to people entering the festival.

China has a well-documented history of persecuting the group — seen as a threat to Communist control — while Canadian authorities have deemed the Falun Gong a spiritual movement deserving of human-rights protections...
https://nationalpost.com/news/falun-gong-incident-more-reason-canada-needs-system-to-handle-complaints-of-chinese-intimidation-amnesty

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3551 on: August 01, 2019, 11:40:06 »
One wonders how involved the Chinese consulate general in Vancouver, and various CPP United Front Work Department-supported local Chinese organizations, are in promoting pro-China actions on campus:

Quote
Hong Kong protests tension spills over onto Simon Fraser University campus

Tensions over the ongoing protests in Hong Kong are growing globally, spilling over onto university campuses as far afield as Brisbane, Auckland — and now to Burnaby.

At Simon Fraser University, a controversy over three “Lennon Walls” — fixtures where people can post notes of support or inspirational wishes — shows how tensions related to increasingly violent protests in Hong Kong may get harder to manage on Canadian campuses. At least one academic is calling on all involved — both students and universities — to take a more formal, respectful approach.

“There are currently two walls,” said Joel Wan, founder of Vancouver Hong Kong Political Activists, a weeks-old, student organization whose Facebook page has posts about the situation at SFU.

The original Lennon Wall, located outside the main Bennett Library, was “repeatedly destroyed and rebuilt, with post-it notes taken down. It’s gone for now,” said Wan.

On Wednesday, some students set up a temporary, second Lennon Wall with post-it notes at a booth. Plans for a third, more permanent Lennon Wall to be established Wednesday were scrapped after assessing security concerns.

“What’s been happening is that we have been reading about other universities having issues where the peaceful and respectful intent of the (Lennon Walls) hasn’t been respected,” said Sylvia Ceacero, executive director of the Simon Fraser Students Society, which supported the third wall.

“We are concerned about the safety of our board and staff and of all students. We just want to ensure and minimize the potential for altercations and conflict that has been seen at other universities.”

Lennon Walls have sprung up in Hong Kong in the wake of citizen protests against its government, with people sticking hundreds of post-it notes in an array of colours on pedestrian underpasses and outdoor staircases. They are handwritten scribbles of support and inspirational wishes for demonstrators protesting a controversial extradition bill that would ease the transfer of fugitives to mainland China.

Other cities have now picked up on mounting Lennon Walls, a concept that originated in Prague, Czech Republic, in the 1980s as an homage to the late John Lennon, assassinated in 1980.

Videos posted on social media show how disagreements over the political situation in Hong Kong between pro-Beijing students and those who support Hong Kong protesters have ended in shoving and punching at the University of Queensland in Australia and at New Zealand’s University of Auckland.

Leo Shin, a professor of Asian Studies at UBC, said Canadian campuses should consider what they can do to head off any serious conflict here.

“I think it is a matter of concern. That we have seen clashes among students in Hong Kong, in Australia and in New Zealand. We should anticipate similar kinds of conflicts to spill over to Canadian campuses,” he said.

“What’s happening in Hong Kong is of a great deal of interest to students who are migrants and among students, in general. There is a large population on Canadian campuses and here at UBC and SFU of students with ties to the Chinese-speaking world. China, Hong Kong and, to some extent, Taiwan. And there are also many second-generation and ‘1.5’ generation students,” he continued.

“There are all kinds and not all are equally concerned, but many are. There are some in the student population supporting the Hong Kong movement and some on (Beijing’s) side, and of course there will be differing opinions. The conflict or clashes in Hong Kong will spill and touch us.

“The tricky thing is what can be done? (A solution will involve finding ways to promote dialogue) in a manner that befits a university where we can disagree in a peaceful manner.”

Simon Fraser University spokeswoman Angela Wilson said it is aware the board of the student society is “considering erecting a Lennon Wall for students’ use. The society has shared that it is currently reviewing protocols to ensure that all safety considerations are met. SFU Campus Public Safety continues to monitor this situation and support campus safety.”

JLee-Young@postmedia.com
https://theprovince.com/news/local-news/hong-kong-protests-tension-spills-over-onto-simon-fraser-university-campus/wcm/baed18be-fde7-43a7-9a9b-5627d3456199

See this earlier by CCP mouthpiece "Global Times':

Quote
Chinese consulate in Australia praises patriotic students for counter-protest against separatists
http://www.globaltimes.cn/content/1159212.shtml

1330 update--note this in New Zealand:

Quote
Chinese consulate praises students in scuffle at Auckland University
https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/114669992/chinese-consulate-praises-auckland-university-students-in-scuffle-for-spontaneous-acts-and-deeds

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« Last Edit: August 01, 2019, 13:27:04 by MarkOttawa »
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3552 on: August 06, 2019, 14:04:28 »
Chicoms threaten India with a trade hammer:

Quote
Exclusive: China warns India of 'reverse sanctions' if Huawei is blocked - sources

China has told India not to block its Huawei Technologies [HWT.UL] from doing business in the country, warning there could be consequences for Indian firms operating in China, sources with knowledge of the matter said.

India is due to hold trials for installing a next-generation 5G cellular network in the next few months, but has not yet taken a call on whether it would invite the Chinese telecoms equipment maker to take part, telecoms minister Ravi Shankar Prasad has said.

Huawei, the world’s biggest maker of such gear, is at the centre of a geopolitical tug-of-war between China and the United States. U.S. President Donald Trump’s administration put the company on a blacklist in May, citing national security concerns. It has asked its allies not to use Huawei equipment, which it says China could exploit for spying.

Two sources privy to internal discussions in New Delhi said India’s ambassador in Beijing, Vikram Misri, was called to the Chinese foreign ministry on July 10 to hear China’s concerns about the U.S. campaign to keep Huawei out of 5G mobile infrastructure worldwide.

During the meeting, Chinese officials said there could be “reverse sanctions” on Indian firms engaged in business in China should India block Huawei because of pressure from Washington, one of the sources said, citing a readout of the ambassador’s meeting.

In response to Reuters’ questions, China’s foreign ministry said Beijing hoped India would make an independent decision on 5G bidders.

“Huawei has carried out operations in India for a long time, and has made contributions to the development of Indian society and the economy that is clear to all,” spokeswoman Hua Chunying said in a statement.

“On the issue of Chinese enterprises participating in the construction of India’s 5G, we hope the Indian side makes an independent and objective decision, and provides a fair, just and non-discriminatory commercial environment for Chinese enterprises’ investment and operations, to realize mutual benefit.”

The Indian foreign ministry did not respond to a request for comment...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-huawei-india-exclusive/exclusive-china-warns-india-of-reverse-sanctions-if-huawei-is-blocked-sources-idUSKCN1UW1FF

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3553 on: August 12, 2019, 17:32:11 »
Meanwhile at Simon Fraser and other universities in Anglosphere:

Quote
Hong Kong protests to Uygur camps: how Chinese students became a subject of scorn

    Campus confrontations have erupted from Canada to New Zealand as mainland Chinese students react, sometimes violently, to public scrutiny of Beijing’s policies
    Such conflict is likely to persist as Chinese diplomatic missions support robust rebuttals to those who disagree with China’s stance [emphasis added--that's one way of describing undiplomatic interference in domestic affairs]

A creative but controversial meme has been racking up likes on a Facebook page titled SFU Dank Memes, a private group frequented by more than 3,700 students at Vancouver’s Simon Fraser University (SFU).

It features a Photoshopped image of a duplicitous masked operative from the popular video game Team Fortress 2 and an accompanying caption that reads: “Try to figure out who’s the Chinese communist spy at SFU when half the school is Chinese. And worst of all, he could be any one of us [emphasis added].”

The purported undercover agent in their midst is an unidentified vandal captured by security cameras last week wrecking the university’s so-called Lennon Wall, a noticeboard turned campaign space which has been covered with a mosaic of multicoloured messages in support of Hong Kong’s anti-government protests
.
The wall has become one of several flashpoints amid an increasingly bitter debate among overseas ethnic Chinese students, which has sparked sometimes testy confrontations emotionally charged by questions of identity, history and political belief. 



“To me, these memes aren’t even funny and merely show ignorance – similar to the racist jokes people made during earlier decades of Chinese immigration,” said 20-year-old student Matthew Wu, who hails from mainland China. “We are talking about serious discrimination towards mainlanders here.”

Wu, who declined to provide his real name, is among the 1.5 million Chinese students studying outside the country who have found themselves thrust into the spotlight at university campuses from Australia
to New Zealand to Canada.  Hong Kong’s extradition bill protests, sometimes unruly, have rocked the city since June and have renewed international scrutiny of Beijing’s policies...

At the University of Queensland in Brisbane, mainland Chinese students last month came to blows with a group supporting the Hong Kong protests when the latter held a demonstration on campus.

The group, comprising of Hong Kong and Australian students, also condemned China’s mass incarceration of ethnic Uygurs in its far western region of Xinjiang. Mainland Chinese make up about 9,000 of the university’s 50,000-strong student population.

Meanwhile, at the Australian National University in Canberra and University of New South Wales in Sydney, local Lennon Walls have also been vandalised or become the site of verbal clashes.

And in New Zealand, at the University of Auckland, where mainland Chinese students make up about 10 per cent of the student body, a man made headlines last month when he was captured on film pushing a female Hongkonger to the ground after an argument over a Lennon Wall...

Canada, Australia and New Zealand, with their natural beauty, clean air and large Chinese diaspora, have long been popular destinations for mainland Chinese youngsters seeking an education overseas. More than 140,000 study at Canadian higher-learning institutions, where they pay an average of C$27,159 (US$20,400) per year in tuition – over four times that of Canadians.

Australia plays host to more than 135,000 mainland Chinese students, and New Zealand almost 30,000.

In Vancouver, one of Canada’s most expensive cities, mainland Chinese students are often perceived as uber-wealthy Lamborghini-driving migrants who lead lavish lifestyles and buy up expensive properties. Yet with all their privilege, perceived or otherwise, they often face difficulties integrating into mainstream society.

...Ma said he and many other mainland Chinese saw displays of support for the Hong Kong protesters as campaigns aimed at separating the city from China, which they took personally.

“It challenges my understanding of my country and myself,” Ma said. He argued that Australian society should seek a greater understanding of the Chinese perspective.

“I do respect freedom of speech – that is a core value – but another core of Australia is multiculturalism. So in that sense, white Australians should also respect Chinese culture – and unity and unification are a very important part of it.”..

Beijing’s influence is on display through some 150 campus organisations that are chapters of the Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA), some of which receive partial government funding for events.
Billed as a student-led group to help adjust to life abroad, American media reports claim to have seen CSSA members in WeChat conversations coordinating with consular officials to rally students for political ends.

Examples include attendance at a protest against a visit by the Dalai Lama to the University of California in San Diego in 2017, and the disruption of a talk by a Uygur activist at McMaster University in British Columbia earlier this year.

“They throw parties and provide rides for new mainland Chinese students, but they also serve as a powerful socialising and monitoring function, where new mainlanders learn that they do not enjoy all the freedoms other students at international universities have,” said Anders Corr, a geopolitical analyst who has written about the influence of these student associations on Western university campuses.

“Chinese students must still promote a positive image of China.”

Meanwhile, Chinese diplomatic missions have made no secret of their support for students promoting Beijing’s line abroad [emphasis added].

After last month’s clashes at the University of Queensland, the consulate in Brisbane issued a statement in Chinese condemning Hong Kong students for “talk of separatism” and “igniting anger and sparking protests”. It praised counter-demonstrators for their “acts of patriotism”.

In New Zealand, after scuffles at the University of Auckland, the city’s consulate lauded students backing Beijing for their “spontaneous acts and deeds out of their love of China and love of Hong Kong”...
https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/society/article/3022207/hong-kong-protests-uygur-camps-how-chinese-students-became

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3554 on: August 13, 2019, 16:52:39 »
By Prof. Charles Burton, one of those rare Canadians who has grokked the nature of the Chicoms for quite a while:

Quote
Xi Jinping may want to rule the world, but he has problems at home, too

Charles Burton is associate professor of political science at Brock University at St. Catharines, Ont., senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute’s Centre for Advancing Canada’s Interests Abroad, and former counsellor at the Canadian embassy in Beijing [as an academic on special assignment, 1991-93, type of position since eliminated,pity https://www.macdonaldlaurier.ca/experts/charles-burton/].

While the Hong Kong showdown continues to deteriorate in clouds of tear gas, hundreds of arrests and increasingly dark rhetoric out of Beijing, the Chinese Communist Party senior leadership has relocated to the seaside town of Beidaihe, 200 kilometres east of Beijing, for their summer retreat.

A party tradition since the 1950s, this is not simply two weeks of sun, sand and sea-bathing with the bodyguards. It is also about political factional posturing in secretive preparation for this fall’s policy debates. There will be a lot of politicking by the beach, as party General-Secretary Xi Jinping strives to reinforce the critical support he needs from the party and military elders, and to stave off any challenges to his authority over the next year.

But things may not go as smoothly as in past retreats. Among the elders attending Beidaihe is former strongman Jiang Zemin. At 92, Mr. Jiang is the patriarch of a significant faction of senior officials who have been severely discomfited by Mr. Xi’s purges, anti-corruption investigations and administrative restructuring to centralize party authority in his own office.

Now that China’s economy and foreign relations are in major turbulence, Mr. Xi is left holding the bag. Much of the problem stems from his attempts to turn back Deng Xiaoping’s legacy of politically accountable collective leadership and undo Mr. Deng’s program of openness to the outside world and market-based economic reform.

It is the betrayal of Mr. Deng’s commitment to 50 years of “one country, two systems” that is the source of Hong Kong’s unrest. China’s propaganda blames the United States as the “black hand” behind the protests, specifically accusing junior diplomat Julie Eadeh, a “trained subversion expert at the U.S. consulate in Hong Kong,” of directing the whole thing. Besides being petty and ridiculous, it is appallingly disgraceful of China’s party-controlled press to openly name Ms. Eadeh’s spouse and two children – apparently an open invitation for the People’s Republic of China’s triad thug supporters to menace the family.

Mr. Xi’s mismanagement of the Hong Kong file strengthens the momentum of Taiwan’s pro-independence regime, seriously compounding the failure of Mr. Xi’s leadership in the eyes of Chinese nationalists who yearn for Taiwan’s reunification with the motherland.

He has aggressively asserted China’s goal to overtake the United States as the global military and political hegemon by 2050, using the Belt and Road Initiative to reorient the world’s economy toward Beijing. This determination is evidenced by shameless flaunting of accepted norms of trade and diplomacy. It is not just Canada that has been outraged by the arbitrary detainment of Michael Kovrig and Michael Spavor, and China’s retaliatory banning of Canadian agricultural products on spurious grounds. In recent years, the Philippines, Japan, Norway, France and South Korea have all had comparable trade and consular pressures put on them for similar political reasons.

But now China’s geostrategic boldness has started to backfire, with a kick back from the United States unifying Republicans and Democrats alike against “the China threat.” The U.S.-China trade war is leading manufacturers with operations in China to pull up stakes and move to locations such as Vietnam, to avoid U.S. tariffs. Moreover, China’s plans to dominate and potentially control global telecommunications infrastructure through its telecom giant Huawei have now been shattered by U.S. opposition.

China’s economy – already unsteady due to pervasive corruption, as well as by overextended banks with too many bad loans on their books – now faces a crisis of business confidence and economic decline. Mr. Xi is unable to respond to U.S. demands that trade relations be fair, honest and reciprocal, lest he alienate too many of the Communist Party elites who ultimately sustain his grip on power.

Perhaps Mr. Xi has done the world a favour by exposing the true nature of the Communist Party’s long-range intentions, but as American commentator Gordon Chang has observed, ultimately his is “a militant, one-person regime that feels surrounded and threatened.”

A “surrounded and threatened” China feeling under siege does not bode well for making a rational conciliatory response to Hong Kong’s unrest. It also does not bode well for the future of Canada-China relations or for global peace. China desperately needs to find a way out of its political conundrum before it’s too late – for all involved.
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-xi-jinping-may-want-to-rule-the-world-but-he-has-problems-at-home/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3555 on: August 13, 2019, 21:18:17 »
One reason why Hong Kong might wind up being treated like a foreign invader by China...


CHINA’S SECURITY PROBLEM
(Rand)

The twin security goals of preserving domestic order and well-being
and deterring external threats to Chinese territory are closely interrelated,
from the Chinese perspective. On the one hand, the maintenance
of domestic order and well-being is viewed as the sine qua non
for the defense of Chinese territory against outside threats. Specifically,
a weak, divided and conflictual, or “unjust” (i.e., highly coercive
and corrupt) leadership and an impoverished, disgruntled populace
are viewed as the primary sources of domestic instability and conflict
and invariably lead to a weakening of China’s defenses, which in turn
invite foreign manipulation and aggression. On the other hand,
maintaining a strong defense, eliciting political (and, during the premodern
period, cultural) deference from the periphery, preserving
the broader goal of Chinese regional centrality, and influencing the
actions of more distant powers are seen as absolutely necessary not
only to ensure regional order and deter or prevent foreign aggression
and territorial dismemberment but also to avert internal social unrest.
This is because a state that is unable to control its borders and
command the respect of foreign powers is seen as weak and unable
to rule its citizenry.

https://www.rand.org/content/dam/rand/pubs/monograph_reports/MR1121/mr1121.ch2.pdf
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3556 on: August 20, 2019, 16:01:28 »
Aren't Canadian sociology profs wonderful?

Quote
Professor Nathan Lauster says Vancouver’s China-money fears mirror Nazism. He just made millions selling home to China-money lobbyists
    UBC academic Nathan Lauster says the role of Chinese money is exaggerated and a ‘moral panic’, testifying in lawsuit aiming to axe Vancouver’s foreign buyer tax
    But at the same time, he was selling his home for C$3million (US$2.3 million), more than double its valuation, to two of the city’s top China-money lobbyists


Ian Young (https://www.scmp.com/author/ian-young)

Godwin’s Law, as anyone remotely familiar with social media should know, posits the shift towards certainty that a comparison to Hitler or Nazism will be made, the longer any online discussion proceeds.

It’s usually a gambit of last resort. But Nathan Lauster – a professor in sociology at the University of British Columbia – went there with little prodding.

Focusing on the role of foreign money in Vancouver’s unaffordable real estate market “mirrors how you move from ‘socialism’ to ‘national socialism’”, he said on Twitter in November.

Lauster is no anonymous troll.

The author of the 2016 book The Death and Life of the Single-Family House, he has been an influential and dismissive voice when it comes to the role of Chinese money in Vancouver’s real estate unaffordability crisis.

Instead of the “exaggerated” role of Chinese investors, Lauster believes Vancouver should be worrying about single family homes, which he calls “invasive parasites”.

It’s a well-liked position by the development industry and supply-side circles.

Lauster has pressed his case widely in social and mainstream media – and in the court battle against Vancouver’s 20 per cent foreign buyer tax.

Lauster was asked to provide expert testimony by Chinese homebuyer Jing Li in her high-profile case against the BC government that seeks to have the tax deemed illegal. It is a wildly popular tax – backed by 81 per cent of BC residents in a 2018 poll. Support among residents of Asian ethnicity is even stronger than among whites, according to a previous survey.

Lauster volunteered to the court in a March 29, 2018, affidavit that “concerns over foreign buyers have taken on the characteristics of a moral panic”.

“This is not to say there aren’t investors living overseas and bidding up local properties in Metro Vancouver, but rather that their impact on the market overall has likely been exaggerated through the stylised and stereotyped social construction of the ‘foreign buyer’ problem, especially as it’s been identified as a particularly Chinese problem,” he said.

“As a result, changes in policy (ie: the Foreign Buyer Tax) have imposed real hardships on individuals … and have inflamed long-standing prejudices against (and within) the Chinese-Canadian community.”

What Lauster did not say in his affidavit was that at the time he was in the process of selling his Vancouver home for millions of dollars, at a price more than double its valuation, to two of the city’s most prominent China-money lobbyists, Pan Miaofei and Chen Yongtao [emphasis added].

A C$3.09 million windfall

This is not to say that Lauster’s views should be disqualified as insincere, or that he, Pan, or Chen, behaved improperly in the sale.

But it is one thing to publicly rubbish a phenomenon – and quite another to do so while privately pocketing millions of dollars as a result of that same phenomenon, courtesy of two of its most enthusiastic facilitators...


Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau (centre) shakes hands with Pan Miaofei at a political fundraising dinner hosted in Pan's Vancouver mansion in November 2016. The dinner became the focus of a “cash for access” furore. Photo: Foreign and Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of the Wenzhou People's Government
...
https://www.scmp.com/news/world/united-states-canada/article/2181447/professor-says-vancouvers-china-money-fears-mirror

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3557 on: August 20, 2019, 16:20:37 »
Further to above post, this from 2016:
Quote
With Serious Chicom Links: "Influential Chinese-Canadians paying to attend private fundraisers with Trudeau"
...
Former Liberal cabinet minister Raymond Chan, who was Mr. Trudeau’s British Columbia fundraiser in the 2015 election campaign, helps with fundraising activities on the West Coast, while Toronto business consultant Richard Zhou is a key organizer of these events in Ontario.

Mr. Chan was at the most recent Trudeau fundraiser, which was held on Nov. 7 at the West Vancouver mansion of B.C. developer Miaofei Pan [same fellow as in preceding post], a multimillionaire from Wenzhou province who immigrated to Canada a decade ago. More than 80 guests got their pictures taken with Mr. Trudeau at the $1,500 per ticket event, including Mr. Chan.

Mr. Pan told The Globe and Mail he lobbied the Prime Minister to make it easier for well-heeled investors from China to come to Canada. He said he told Mr. Trudeau the program put in place by the former Conservative government was “too harsh.”

In exchange for permanent residency, rich immigrants must invest $2-million and are subject to strict audits…

A Chinese government agency in Mr. Pan’s hometown that builds ties with and keeps tabs on expatriate Chinese, supplied photos of the Trudeau-Pan event to media in China. The Foreign and Overseas Chinese Affairs Office of the Wenzhou People’s Government promotes China’s interests abroad, according to former Canadian diplomat and China expert Charles Burton.

“That is an agency of the Chinese Communist Party,” Mr. Burton told The Globe and Mail. “The fact that the photos appeared in the [Wenzhou Metropolis Daily] in China suggests that the people who participated in that activity must have been tasked by the Chinese state to try and promote the Chinese position with influential people in Canada. In this case, our Prime Minister.”

Mr. Pan is honorary chair of a Chinese-Canadian organization that is an unabashed backer of Beijing’s territorial claims in the South China Sea and East China Sea [emphasis added, see “Ethnic Chinese Abroad: Once a Dragon, Always a Dragon Says Beijing“]…
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/12/05/mark-collins-with-serious-chicom-links-influential-chinese-canadians-paying-to-attend-private-fundraisers-with-trudeau/

Links to to other posts in one above no longer work, but do if copy and paste in "Search" box at top right.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3558 on: August 25, 2019, 14:43:51 »
More on Dragon's scary reach in Canadian education (with videos):

Quote
Chinese influence in Canada ‘alive and well,’ says student leader threatened by trolls

Canada is failing to combat the spread of Chinese influence that is “alive and well” throughout the country, one prominent student leader says.

And she argues the presence of politicians like former Ontario trade minister Michael Chan [see below after this quote] as a headliner at a rally last week to mobilize the Chinese diaspora against pro-democracy protests in Hong Kong is just another sign of how far Beijing’s influence has spread.

READ MORE: YouTube pulls 210 channels linked to Hong Kong protests influence campaign

“I’m definitely concerned,” said Chemi Lhamo, president of the student union at the University of Toronto’s Scarborough campus, and a Canadian citizen of Tibetan heritage, in an interview with The West Block‘s Mercedes Stephenson.

“These are the folks that are actually implementing the propaganda and amplifying the propaganda that the Chinese state is trying to control.”

WATCH: Ottawa has been weak responding to Beijing, expert says

Lhamo made headlines earlier this year when her election as student union president prompted a wave of abuse by Chinese trolls who mobilized online to threaten Lhamo’s position, her future — and even her life.

“Somehow the international Chinese community came to find out that I was running for the elections, but to be specific, it was more like a Tibetan running for the campaign. When they found out, they immediately released a petition online against me. In addition to that, they took it on social media and they started giving me comments in the thousands from rape threats to death threats — not only to me but my family members,” she said.

“There was a pattern in these comments. Everything was talking about Tibet and China.”

READ MORE: Over 900 Chinese Twitter, Facebook accounts disabled over ‘deceptive tactics’

Those attacks came both from abroad and at home. In some cases, she says she was even told by attackers that they went to school right on her campus.

And Lhamo believes what she experienced is part of a broader pattern of Chinese influence spread throughout Canada.

“It’s alive and well, and it’s creeping on us in every corner.”

Lhamo cited the influence the Chinese government is able to extend through the Confucius Institute, a network of hundreds of centres around the world funded by the Chinese government and branded as educational programs that offer services like Mandarin lessons to students.

But critics argue they are in fact a propaganda arm for the Chinese state used as a means to mobilize pro-Beijing actors in their regions.

WATCH: How far will China go to impose change in Hong Kong?

Last week, the Australian government scrapped Confucius Institutes in that country amid growing fears of the extent of Chinese influence and cited concerns about potential interference and inappropriate influence in its review of the programs.

The U.S. Senate’s Homeland Security committee also released a scathing report earlier this year calling for the centres to be shut down.

In Canada, CSIS has already issued warnings about Chinese influence across all levels of government in this country and declassified intelligence reports pointed to the creation of the centres as part of China’s plans to exert soft power abroad [emphasis added].

But universities and public school systems have continued to sign agreements with the Confucius Institute amid a the backdrop of broader funding cuts for education and increasing demands for services that will prepare students to work in a world with growing Asian power.

There continue to be 12 Confucius Institutes across the country, along with regional programming with public school boards, with more than 20,000 students.

China has repeatedly said the goal of the centres is simply to teach Mandarin and increase awareness about China.

READ MORE: Conservatives want CSIS to investigate John McCallum for election interference

The New Brunswick government tried and failed to axe the programs earlier this year over concerns the institute was blacklisting topics that countered the Chinese state’s opinions. The Toronto District School Board also cancelled plans for the programs several years ago.

Confucius Institutes and connected programming remain in public schools in Alberta, B.C, and other provinces, as well as numerous university campuses including Ottawa’s Carleton University, the University of Regina, the University of Saskatchewan, Toronto’s Seneca College and the University of Waterloo [emphasis added].

Lhamo says without a much stronger stance from the government, Chinese influence will continue to spread.

“There is so much more that we can do,” she said, suggesting attention should turn to students studying in Canada, many of whom she suggests are coming under intense pressure from the Chinese government back home to carry out activities abroad that advocate the state line.

“Chinese international students are one of the biggest cash cows for universities and academic institutions. It’s time that we take a stance and let them know their human rights record does not reflect international standards.”
https://globalnews.ca/news/5804742/chinese-influence-canada/

From 2016 on Michael Chan (link at start no longer works, but does if copy and paste in "Search" box at top right)

Quote
How Convenient: “Ontario minister Michael Chan defends China’s human-rights record”
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/mark-collins-how-convenient-ontario-minister-michael-chan-defends-chinas-human-rights-record/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3559 on: August 28, 2019, 10:14:29 »
Will Justin Trudeau or Andrew Scheer dare suggest similar action in Canada, what with the federal election close at hand and all those voters of Chinese origin?

Quote
Australia investigates foreign interference at universities as fears of Chinese influence grow

    A new task force will comprise of university staff and government officials, and will look at issues such as cyberattacks and national security
    The announcement comes amid heightened scrutiny of China’s influence at Australian universities following a spate of cyberattacks and demonstrations

Australia on Wednesday [Aug. 28] launched a task force to clamp down on foreign interference at universities amid growing concerns about Chinese influence on college campuses.

Education Minister Dan Tehan said the task force, which will be equally comprised of university staff and government officials, would tackle the “intersection of national security, research, collaboration and a university’s autonomy”.

“Universities also understand the risk to their operations and to the national interest from cyberattacks and foreign interference and we are working constructively to address it,” Tehan said.

The initiative will include separate working groups tasked with cybersecurity, fostering a “positive security culture”, protecting intellectual property, and ensuring transparency in collaborations between universities and foreign entities.

“The task force has the potential to be a valuable channel to consult and coordinate efforts by the government and universities,” said Alex Joske, a researcher at the Australian Strategic Policy Institute in Canberra.

“I hope it will lead to genuine action by universities, and encourage effective solutions that involve proactive measures from both government and universities.”

The announcement comes amid heightened scrutiny of China’s influence at universities following a spate of cyberattacks, aggressive demonstrations by ultranationalist mainland students, and incidents of Australian academic research allegedly being used by Beijing to violate human rights. It also follows the release of a report by the Sydney-based Centre for Independent Studies last week which warned that universities were taking a “multibillion-dollar gamble” due to a massive overreliance on Chinese students for revenue.

The report found that seven “too big to fail” universities had much higher numbers of Chinese students than universities in countries such as the United States and the UK, relying on their fees for 13-23 per cent of revenues
[emphasis added--Canada?].

John Blaxland, a professor at the Strategic and Defence Studies Centre at Australian National University in Canberra, said the launch of the task force reflected a “mood shift” in Australia around the issue of foreign interference [emphasis added].

“Nobody wants to turn off the Chinese students but at the same time, one of the things that’s so attractive about our universities is that we’re open liberal institutions of learning,” Blaxland said. “And what we’ve seen, particularly in the last couple of weeks in Australia in response to what’s happening in Hong Kong, has been a little bit chilling.”

In recent weeks, nationalist [actually pro-Beijing] Chinese have staged at times violent counter-demonstrations against pro-democracy Hongkongers and their supporters in Australian cities including Melbourne and Brisbane.

On Monday, the University of Queensland in Brisbane said it had launched an investigation after the ASPI’s Joske published evidence that a firm founded by one of its professors had supplied technology used in the mass surveillance of Uygurs in westernmost Xinjiang. The professor, Heng Tao Shen, disputed the claims as “totally irresponsible” and “wrong”.

Last month, the University of Technology Sydney said it would review a A$10 million partnership with China Electronics Technology Group, a supplier of surveillance technology in Xinjiang, and Curtin University in Perth announced an investigation after an academic helped develop artificial intelligence technology used to pinpoint Chinese ethnic minorities [YIKES!]...


Students in Brisbane hold placards during a protest against the Chinese government’s funding of education organisations in Queensland. Photo: EPA-EFE
https://www.scmp.com/week-asia/geopolitics/article/3024742/australia-investigates-foreign-interference-universities

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3560 on: August 31, 2019, 15:44:01 »
Wiping out the Uyghurs--one way or another? Review of documentary on BBC:

Quote
China: A New World Order review – are we conniving with a genocidal dictatorship
This documentary dared to do what politicians the world over would not, asking tough questions of Xi Jinping’s hardline rule

he drink Mihrigul Tursun’s captors offered her was strangely cloudy. It resembled, she said, water after washing rice. After drinking it, the young mother recalled in China: A New World Order (BBC Two), her period stopped. “It didn’t come back until five months after I left prison. So my period stopped seven months in total. Now it’s back, but it’s abnormal.”

We never learned why Tursun was detained – along with an estimated one million other Uighurs of Xinjiang province, in what the authorities euphemistically call re-education centres – but we heard clearly her claims of being tortured. “They cut off my hair and electrocuted my head,” Tursun said. “I couldn’t stand it any more. I can only say please just kill me.”

Instead of murdering one Uighur mother, critics of Beijing contend, China is attempting something worse – eliminating a people. “There’s a widely held misunderstanding that genocide is the scale of extermination of human beings,” said the former UN human rights envoy Ben Emmerson QC. “That’s not so. The question is: is there an intention to, if you like, wipe off the face of the Earth a distinct group, a nation, a people?” This, Emmerson and Barack Obama’s former CIA director Leon Panetta claimed, is what is happening to the Islamic people of Xinjiang. “This is a calculated social policy designed to eliminate the separate cultural, religious and ethnic identity of the Uighurs,” said Emmerson. “That’s a genocidal policy.”

Independently verifying Tursun’s treatment is scarcely possible, but this documentary heard claims of similar treatment in the province. A teacher and Communist party member told how she had been sent to teach Chinese at a detention camp for 2,500 Uighurs. She claimed not only to have heard detainees being tortured, but also to have learned from a nurse that women were given injections that had the same effect as the drink Tursun took. “They stop your periods and seriously affect reproductive organs,” she said.

China, we learned, denies these charges and claims to be committed to protecting ethnic minority identities. What its critics call detention camps, Beijing describes as “vocational education and training centres” resembling “boarding schools”. We cut to official footage of drawing, dancing and in one room a class singing in English “If you’re happy and you know it, shout ‘Yes sir!’” Which, while not proof of genocidal policy, was grim enough viewing.
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But without doubt, since 2013 when Xi Jinping became president and there was an attack in Tiananmen Square in which Uighur terrorists killed five people and injured 38, Beijing has cracked down on what it perceives as an Islamist threat from the province. That crackdown has included using smartphones and street cameras to create a surveillance state for Uighurs.

Should Britain roll out the red carpet to a country charged with crimes against humanity, of undermining freedom of speech and democracy in Hong Kong, of crushing freedom movements in Beijing, of – it was suggested here – creating a cult of personality around Xi the likes of which have not been seen since Chairman Mao? “Better we engage with them so we can influence them,” said the former chancellor George Osborne.

But does the UK have any influence? Certainly not as much as we did in in the 19th century when, instead of trying to charm them into trade deals, we militarily subdued the Chinese to profitably drug them with opium. “Very few countries have any leverage at all,” said Jeremy Hunt, the former foreign secretary. The rest of the world shrinks from criticising China’s human rights violations because we’re awed by its economic power and how we benefit from it, argued Panetta.

This first of a three-part series did what politicians dare not do, namely to raise hard questions, not just of Beijing, but of us. Are we so in thrall to consumerism, to buying cheap goods made by cheap labour in China, so intimidated by Chinese military and economic might, that we connive with what may well amount to a criminal dictatorship? The Chinese refer to the 19th century, during which the British oppressed them with two opium wars, as the Century of Humiliation. Ours is becoming the Century of Moral Feebleness...
https://www.theguardian.com/tv-and-radio/2019/aug/29/china-a-new-world-order-review-are-we-conniving-with-a-genocidal-dictatorship

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3561 on: September 04, 2019, 14:30:43 »
Good grief! Trudeau has name a top comprador as our next person in Beijing:

Quote
Dominic Barton named Canada’s new ambassador to China
...
Mr. Barton 56, has been a prominent Canadian in international economic affairs, with a long career at consultancy firm McKinsey & Company, where he served as global managing partner for nine years, ending in 2018. He was most recently listed as global managing partner emeritus at McKinsey, although his biography was no longer available on the company’s website Wednesday [Sept. 4]...

“For the Canadian government to have somebody of Dominic Barton’s stature as ambassador would be seen as a very great success, a real coup,” said John Manley, the former deputy prime minister who also previously served as the president of the Business Council of Canada.

“Dominic is one of those few international business leaders who was able to meet at the very highest level with Chinese leadership when he visited China as the head of McKinsey. He’s very well-known in China,” he said...

Mr. Barton is a Rhodes scholar who was born in Uganda, and has lived in Asia, Europe and North America. He recently moved to Hong Kong [RING-SIDE SEAT, eh?], although he has said he maintained a home in Vancouver...
https://www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-dominic-barton-named-canadas-new-ambassador-to-china/

Aaargh! A bio:
Quote
Dominic Barton is the global managing partner [now emeritius] of McKinsey & Company. In his 30 years with the firm, he has advised clients in a range of industries, including banking, consumer goods, high tech, and industrials. Prior to his current role, Dominic was based in Shanghai as McKinsey’s Asia chairman from 2004 to 2009. He led the Korea office from 2000 to 2004.

He is the chair of the Canadian Minister of Finance’s Advisory Council on Economic Growth and the chair of the Seoul International Business Advisory Council. He is also a trustee of the Brookings Institution, a member of the Singapore Economic Development Board’s International Advisory Council, and a member of the boards of Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York City and the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada.

Dominic has authored more than 80 articles on the role of business in society, leadership, financial services, Asia, history, and the issues and opportunities facing markets worldwide. He is a coauthor, with Roberto Newell and Greg Wilson, of Dangerous Markets: Managing in Financial Crises (Wiley & Sons, 2002) and of China Vignettes: An Inside Look at China (Talisman, 2007)...
https://www.fcltglobal.org/about/staff/staff-bio/dominic-barton

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3562 on: September 04, 2019, 18:43:58 »
Good grief! Trudeau has name a top comprador as our next person in Beijing:

Aaargh! A bio:
Mark
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Sounds like a pretty qualified choice, I don’t see any obvious fault with him in the role.
Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3563 on: September 04, 2019, 19:03:18 »
Eminently qualified from the Chicoms point of view, and that of our Canadian compradors (https://www.britannica.com/topic/comprador)--see what his company, McKinsey, has been up to:
Quote
How McKinsey Has Helped Raise the Stature of Authoritarian Governments

Dec. 15, 2018

This year’s McKinsey & Company retreat in China was one to remember.

Hundreds of the company’s consultants frolicked in the desert, riding camels over sand dunes and mingling in tents linked by red carpets. Meetings took place in a cavernous banquet hall that resembled a sultan’s ornate court, with a sign overhead to capture the mood.

“I can’t keep calm, I work at McKinsey & Company,” it said.

Especially remarkable was the location: Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road city in China’s far west that is experiencing a major humanitarian crisis.

About four miles from where the McKinsey consultants discussed their work, which includes advising some of China’s most important state-owned companies, a sprawling internment camp had sprung up to hold thousands of ethnic Uighurs — part of a vast archipelago of indoctrination camps where the Chinese government has locked up as many as one million people.

One week before the McKinsey event, a United Nations committee had denounced the mass detentions and urged China to stop.
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But the political backdrop did not appear to bother the McKinsey consultants, who posted pictures on Instagram chronicling their Disney-like adventures. In fact, McKinsey’s involvement with the Chinese government goes much deeper than its odd choice to showcase its presence in the country.

For a quarter-century, the company has joined many American corporations in helping stoke China’s transition from an economic laggard to the world’s second-largest economy. But as China’s growth presents a muscular challenge to American dominance, Washington has become increasingly critical of some of Beijing’s signature policies, including the ones McKinsey has helped advance.
Editors’ Picks
Where Does Affirmative Action Leave Asian-Americans?
How a Trump Tax Break to Help Poor Communities Became a Windfall for the Rich
Organoids Are Not Brains. How Are They Making Brain Waves?

One of McKinsey’s state-owned clients has even helped build China’s artificial islands in the South China Sea, a major point of military tension with the United States.

It turns out that McKinsey’s role in China is just one example of its extensive — and sometimes contentious — work around the world, according to an investigation by The New York Times that included interviews with 40 current and former McKinsey employees, as well as dozens of their clients.

At a time when democracies and their basic values are increasingly under attack, the iconic American company has helped raise the stature of authoritarian and corrupt governments across the globe, sometimes in ways that counter American interests.

Its clients have included Saudi Arabia’s absolute monarchy, Turkey under the autocratic leadership of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, and corruption-plagued governments in countries like South Africa.

In Ukraine, McKinsey and Paul Manafort — President Trump’s campaign chairman, later convicted of financial fraud — were paid by the same oligarch to help burnish the image of a disgraced presidential candidate, Viktor F. Yanukovych, recasting him as a reformer.

Once in office, Mr. Yanukovych rebuffed the West, sided with Russia and fled the country, accused of stealing hundreds of millions of dollars. The events set off years of chaos in Ukraine and an international standoff with the Kremlin.

Inside Russia itself, McKinsey has worked with Kremlin-linked companies that have been placed under sanctions by Western governments — companies that the firm helped build up over the years and, in some cases, continues to advise...
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/15/world/asia/mckinsey-china-russia.html

Sweet.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3564 on: September 12, 2019, 14:03:05 »
One does not imagine the CCP is much less active in Canada, esp. greater Vancouver and Toronto areas:

Quote
Chinese influence pervades Australian politics
Parliamentarian Gladys Liu’s exposed

A legislator in Australia’s ruling coalition has admitted she had links with a communist group used by Beijing to advance its interests overseas. The potentially explosive revelation comes amid increasing scrutiny of political activities by ethnic Chinese in the country.

Gladys Liu, Australia’s first China-born member of parliament, confirmed on September 11 that she had an honorary role in the Guangdong provincial chapter of the China Overseas Exchange Association (COEA) from 2003-2015.

Then run by the Communist Party’s powerful State Council, the COEA is now part of the United Front Work Department, a shadowy state agency tasked with spreading Chinese influence abroad.

“I have resigned from many organizations and I am in the process of auditing any organizations who may have added me as a member without my knowledge or consent,” Liu said. “I do not wish my name to be used in any of these associations and I ask them to stop using my name.”

Liu did not refer to documents showing she had also belonged to the Shandong chapter of the COEA in 2010, but insisted she was “a proud Australian … and any suggestion contrary to this is deeply offensive.”

She has also denied reports that she has links with Ji Jianmin, president of Huaxing Arts Troupe, a cultural organization that is overseen by the State Council.

Ji has been identified as a junket operator who brings high-profile gamblers to the Crown Casino in Melbourne: one of those he brought to Australia recently was Ming Chai, a cousin of China’s leader Xi Jinping.

Interviewed about her political beliefs on Sky News, Liu declined three times to describe China’s actions in the South China Sea as illegal, saying only that she backed the Australian government’s position on the issue.

Canberra does not take sides in the dispute but accepted a ruling by an arbitral tribunal at The Hague handed down in July 2016 that China’s wide-ranging claims to the sea in its nine-dash line map were not consistent with international law.

“Our relationship with China is one of mutual benefit and underpinned by our Comprehensive Strategic Partnership. China is not a democracy and is run under an authoritarian system, Liu said in an apparent attempt to tamp down the controversy. “We have always been and will continue to be clear-eyed about our political differences, but do so based on mutual respect, as two sovereign nations.”

Prime Minister Scott Morrison [Liberal, actually conservative] said that Liu, who represents a Melbourne seat with a large Chinese population, is a “fit and proper” legislator.
https://www.asiatimes.com/2019/09/article/chinese-influence-pervades-australian-politics/

Post from 2016 on Ontario (link at start no longer works but does if copy and paste in "Search" box at upper right):

Quote
How Convenient: “Ontario minister Michael Chan defends China’s human-rights record”
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/06/09/mark-collins-how-convenient-ontario-minister-michael-chan-defends-chinas-human-rights-record/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3565 on: September 14, 2019, 15:35:48 »
USAF (and other US services) look like they're on an increasingly sticky wicket faced with China:

Quote
The high cost of survival in an air war with China

To gain the upper hand in air combat, it is often better to focus on the ground. That was the opinion of one early air power theorist; as General Giulio Douhet of the Italian army noted in 1921: "It is easier and more effective to destroy the enemy's aerial power by destroying his nests and eggs on the ground than to hunt his flying birds in the air." And for the better part of the past century, Douhet's maxim has shaped US Air Force (USAF) strategy, as its commanders have sought to make their air bases fortified and resilient against attack.

That philosophy prevailed until threats to US air bases all but disappeared with the fall of the Soviet Union in 1991. Over the past three decades, the service has focused its efforts on seeking efficiencies through consolidating operations to fewer, larger airfields.

But the era of efficiencies might now be over. As China buys and builds new long-range fighters, bombers, cruise missiles and ballistic missiles – as well as far-sighted satellites and surveillance aircraft – the USA is revisiting the idea of the vulnerable air base. A string of US and Allied facilities in the Western Pacific, including areas as far from any homeland as Andersen AFB in Guam are now viewed as exposed to potential attack from Beijing.

According to an August 2019 report by United States Studies Centre at the University of Sydney [https://www.ussc.edu.au/analysis/averting-crisis-american-strategy-military-spending-and-collective-defence-in-the-indo-pacific], in Australia: "This growing arsenal of accurate long-range missiles poses a major threat to almost all American, allied and partner bases, airstrips, ports and military installations in the Western Pacific.

"As these facilities could be rendered useless by precision strikes in the opening hours of a conflict, the [Chinese] missile threat challenges America's ability to freely operate its forces from forward locations throughout the region.”

In response, the USAF is considering a new strategy known as distributed operations, a concept that calls for the service to operate from a greater number of more spread out air bases, of sizes small and large, so as to increase the number of targets an adversary would need to attack. In other words, the USAF has decided not to put all of its eggs in one basket.


F-22 Raptors fly over Wake Island

BETTER ODDS

The distributed operations concept increases the odds of aircraft surviving or avoiding being attacked, according to a USAF-commissioned study by the RAND Corporation, which was released to the public in July 2019 [https://www.rand.org/pubs/research_reports/RR2959.html].

"It's tough to defend, to defeat a… precision cruise missile with a big warhead," says RAND Corporation senior political scientist Alan Vick, one of the study's co-authors. "But then, it's very costly for them to have a weapon of that size and quality against every aircraft (and) location."

Distributed operations are also costly for the USA, however. As the report observes, more bases means more resources: anti-aircraft weapons, ammunition depots, communications equipment, fuel storage, aircraft hangars, maintenance personnel, soldiers to defend the airfield perimeter and headquarters staff. It could also mean a decentralised command and control structure, which could be complex and reliant on communications that are vulnerable to cyberattack.

To make such a strategy work, the USAF could use a mixture of three types of air bases: a stay-and-fight base, a drop-in facility and a fighter forward arming and refuelling point (FARP), says the RAND Corporation. The mixture of bases would have different strengths and weaknesses for various missions, given the available geography and resources the service has access to during a conflict.

A stay-and-fight base would likely be the furthest from combat zones and the most heavily fortified with active and passive defences. Active defences might include Patriot missiles for air defence and a THAAD high-altitude anti-ballistic missile defence system. Passive defence could include camouflage and concrete aircraft hangars, as well as dispersal of aircraft, fuel, and payloads across the airfield.

Drop-in and FARP facilities would have fewer defences. The former would only have enough strength to recover from an attack to evacuate aircraft. The latter would only be used for a few hours, enough time for a fighter to receive quick maintenance, fuel and ammunition, before an adversary would detect their location and launch an attack – effectively forcing the enemy to play whack-a-mole [read on]...


https://www.flightglobal.com/news/articles/the-high-cost-of-survival-in-an-air-war-with-china-460409/

Plus posts from 2016:

Quote
USAF “Officers Give New Details for F-35 in War With China”
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/07/04/mark-collins-usaf-officers-give-new-details-for-f-35-in-war-with-china/

RAND on War Between the Dragon and the Eagle
https://mark3ds.wordpress.com/2016/08/02/mark-collins-rand-on-war-between-the-dragon-and-the-eagle/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3566 on: September 14, 2019, 18:39:12 »
Long post on Intapundit today, as Michael Yon continues to report from Hong Kong. One thing of note is how China has quietly backed down on some tariffs, since the importation of food is a major concern of the government:

https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/342055/

Quote
”There is a tiny, tiny notice in the news today that China has backed off on its tariffs on US soy and pork.

Ya don’t say…

First of all, soy and pork are protein, which is a chronic problem in all national food chains, but more so in China. Between their traditional plant based diet and the cultural prestige of eating pork (the middle class literally measures its affluence by how many nights a week they eat pork and the lower classes and villages use pork as a celebratory meal), China’s protein consumption is very narrowly restricted to soy and pork (fish is common, but not nearly as available as soy and pork).

Second, by lifting the tariffs, China has just admitted it cannot produce enough protein for national consumption, both as a staple or as a preferred meat. Imagine a US shortage of wheat and chicken, with no real access to corn or beef, and a couple dozen urban areas of 20 millions or more with just a third arable land as now. That’s China.

So, what’s the problem with China’s agricultural industry? Basically, they simply do not have enough land to grow the volume of soy they need; and, their pork production is highly diffused and is ravaged by a massive and seemingly uncontrollable swine flu epidemic. In fact, it is estimated that up to 60% of China’s pigs are infected with the flu.

As well:
Quote
While this seems to have little to do with defense or military matters, I would suggest it is a huge red shift event offering insights into both the underlying economic and organizational civilian support system of the Red Army and suggestive of a wider indigenous structural and organizational condition of the military and government writ large.

I believe we can draw significant conclusions from closely studying China’s responses to this food supply crisis and extrapolating our observations to the military to understand what they do under stressful conditions, what resources they deploy, and how they organize their response. Not to mention, how the civilian population responds to the military’s demands.

“Stipulated: The food supply chain is in fact a national security issue and it is a function of the military’s most basic needs. A lot can be learned by studying this issue.”

Lots of interesting things to watch lately
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3567 on: September 16, 2019, 11:33:00 »
Seems this may have been linked as some not satisfied with government's public response:
Quote
Exclusive: Australia concluded China was behind hack on parliament, political parties – sources   

Australian intelligence determined China was responsible for a cyber-attack on its national parliament and three largest political parties before the general election in May, five people with direct knowledge of the matter told Reuters.

Australia’s cyber intelligence agency - the Australian Signals Directorate (ASD) - concluded in March that China’s Ministry of State Security was responsible for the attack, the five people with direct knowledge of the findings of the investigation told Reuters.

The five sources declined to be identified due to the sensitivity of the issue. Reuters has not reviewed the classified report.

The report, which also included input from the Department of Foreign Affairs, recommended keeping the findings secret in order to avoid disrupting trade relations with Beijing, two of the people said. The Australian government has not disclosed who it believes was behind the attack or any details of the report ]emphasis added].

In response to questions posed by Reuters, Prime Minister Scott Morrison’s office declined to comment on the attack, the report’s findings or whether Australia had privately raised the hack with China. The ASD also declined to comment.

China’s Foreign Ministry denied involvement in any sort of hacking attacks and said the internet was full of theories that were hard to trace.

“When investigating and determining the nature of online incidents there must be full proof of the facts, otherwise it’s just creating rumors and smearing others, pinning labels on people indiscriminately. We would like to stress that China is also a victim of internet attacks,” the Ministry said in a statement sent to Reuters.

“China hopes that Australia can meet China halfway, and do more to benefit mutual trust and cooperation between the two countries.”

China is Australia’s largest trading partner, dominating the purchase of Australian iron ore, coal and agricultural goods, buying more than one-third of the country’s total exports and sending more than a million tourists and students there each year.

Australian authorities felt there was a “very real prospect of damaging the economy” if it were to publicly accuse China over the attack, one of the people said.

UNHINDERED ACCESS

Australia in February revealed hackers had breached the network of the Australian national parliament. Morrison said at the time that the attack was “sophisticated” and probably carried out by a foreign government. He did not name any government suspected of being involved [emphasis added].  

When the hack was discovered, Australian lawmakers and their staff were told by the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the President of the Senate to urgently change their passwords, according to a parliamentary statement at the time.

The ASD investigation quickly established that the hackers had also accessed the networks of the ruling Liberal party, its coalition partner the rural-based Nationals, and the opposition Labor party, two of the sources said.

The Labor Party did not respond to a request for comment. One person close to the party said it was informed of the findings, without providing details.

The timing of the attack, three months ahead of Australia’s election, and coming after the cyber-attack on the U.S. Democratic Party ahead of the 2016 U.S. election, had raised concerns of election interference, but there was no indication that information gathered by the hackers was used in any way, one of the sources said.

Morrison and his Liberal-National coalition defied polls to narrowly win the May election, a result Morrison described as a “miracle”...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-australia-china-cyber-exclusive/exclusive-australia-concluded-china-was-behind-hack-on-parliament-political-parties-sources-idUSKBN1W00VF

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3568 on: September 26, 2019, 15:40:12 »
I cannot recall when, if ever, Canada has arrested anyone for spying for China:

Quote
Ex-U.S. intelligence officer gets 10 years in Chinese espionage case

A former U.S. Defense Intelligence Agency officer who admitted he betrayed his country for financial gain was sentenced on Tuesday to 10 years in federal prison for attempted espionage on behalf of China, the U.S. Justice Department said.

Ron Rockwell Hansen, 60, of Syracuse, Utah, pleaded guilty in March to trying to pass classified U.S. national defense information to China, and admitted to receiving hundreds of thousands of dollars as an agent for the Beijing government.

FBI agents arrested Hansen in June 2018 as he was on his way to the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport to board a flight to China, the Justice Department said.

As part of his guilty plea, Hansen acknowledged soliciting U.S. national security information that he knew China would find valuable from a fellow Defense Intelligence Agency (DIA) case officer, and agreeing to sell that information to the Chinese.

The documents he received from the DIA officer related to U.S. military readiness. Hansen also admitted to having advised the DIA case officer how to record and transmit the documents without detection, and how to hide and launder any funds received as payment for those secrets.

Unbeknownst to Hansen, the case officer reported his conduct to the DIA and acted as an FBI informant in the case.

Hansen, who is fluent in Mandarin Chinese and Russian, was hired by the DIA as a civilian case officer in 2006 following his retirement from the U.S. Army as a warrant officer with an intelligence background, according to court records.

Chinese intelligence agents recruited him in 2014, he admitted.

Hansen, who was sentenced by a federal judge in Salt Lake City, is one of three former American intelligence officers convicted in recent months on charges of espionage on behalf of China [emphasis added].

One of them, Kevin Patrick Mallory, a former CIA agent, was sentenced in May to 20 years in prison for conspiracy to transmit U.S. defense secrets to China. Another, former CIA officer Jerry Chun Shing Lee, pleaded guilty to charges of spying for China and is awaiting sentencing.

"These cases show the breadth of the Chinese government's espionage efforts and the threat they pose to our national security," Assistant Attorney General John Demurs said in a statement. (Reporting by Steve Gorman in Los Angeles; editing by Jonathan Oatis)
http://news.trust.org/item/20190924222024-aiftk/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3569 on: September 27, 2019, 12:03:14 »
I cannot recall when, if ever, Canada has arrested anyone for spying for China:


The problem does not seem to be arresting Chinese spies but being able to successfully prosecute them.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/hamilton/case-of-hamilton-man-allegedly-spying-for-china-tangled-in-secrecy-1.5193658
Quote
Case of Hamilton man allegedly spying for China, tangled in secrecy
It has been more than five years since Qing Quentin Huang was arrested in Burlington, Ont.

The Canadian Press · Posted: Jun 28, 2019

The case of a Canadian man accused of trying to spy for China is once again tied up in mysterious closed-door proceedings over confidential information.
 
It has been more than five years since Qing Quentin Huang was arrested in Burlington, Ont., following an RCMP-led investigation called Project Seascape.

Huang, an employee of Lloyd's Register, a subcontractor to Irving Shipbuilding Inc., was charged under the Security of Information Act with attempting to communicate secrets to a foreign power.

. . . .

https://www.thestar.com/news/immigration/2018/05/17/man-accused-of-spying-for-china-can-remain-in-canada-immigration-board-rules.html
Quote
Man accused of spying for China can remain in Canada, immigration board rules
Nicholas Keung Immigration Reporter    Thu., May 17, 2018

A Chinese immigrant accused of being a spy can remain in Canada after the federal government lost an appeal to strip him of his permanent resident status.

In upholding a lower tribunal’s decision, the Immigration Appeal Division concluded that Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale and his officials have failed to establish Yang Wang was a member of the Chinese Ministry of State Security (MSS) or Taiwan’s Military Intelligence Bureau (MIB) to render him “inadmissible” to Canada.

While the 40-year-old Toronto man had admitted to providing information for both intelligence agencies, the appeal tribunal said the information — including details about the activities of Falun Gong, a spiritual practice banned in China — was obtained through “open source research” and personal knowledge.

. . . .
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3570 on: September 30, 2019, 13:22:36 »
Start and end of major article:

Quote
Fifth Column Fears: The Chinese Influence Campaign in the United States
The growing reach of PRC influence operations present a special challenge for Asian-Americans.

We were halfway through the lavish Chinese welcome banquet — the honey walnut prawns had just arrived — when the obligatory toasting for the USAF delegation began. I sighed regretfully but shot to my feet when I noticed the figure coming toward me, maotai glass in hand, was none other than our host and the head of the Chinese delegation, a high-ranking general in the People’s Liberation Army Air Force.

He was already a bit unsteady, but he ordered his aide to bring over another glass, and to invite someone else to my table — a friend of mine, a fellow Asian-American officer. He then waved his aide aside to pour the three glasses of maotai himself. A signal honor, and rather puzzling as neither my friend nor myself were more than middling rank.

The toast started out in standard fashion. “To your health.” Drink. “To your families.” Drink. Then came the twist. “And to remembering that blood is thicker than water. Chinese blood runs through you. You understand us, and know that no matter what flag you wear on your shoulders, you are Chinese first and foremost.”

I lifted the glass to my lips but did not drink. That particular line was, and is, a common phrase in Chinese Communist Party (CCP) propaganda specifically aimed at the Chinese diaspora. While that dinner was a number of years ago, the propaganda has not changed. In fact, Chinese influence operations in the United States have dramatically intensified and increased in sophistication over the last few years. This poses an unique and significant threat to Asian-Americans...

The U.S. government should invest more heavily in academia and begin outreach to academic organizations to increase understanding of CCP influence operations. PRC threats to U.S. university funding should be met with homegrown U.S. financial and informational support, to include diversification of the international student demographics and to publicly support Chinese students/researchers whom face PRC opprobrium/internet doxing for speaking their minds. Similarly, attempts by U.S. universities to self-censor for PRC financial gain – as North Carolina State University did in 2009 when they cancelled the Dalai Lama’s visit after the local Confucius Institute objected — should be met with very public U.S. Congressional questioning. Finally, the U.S. government should lend counterintelligence and Department of Justice support for countries, such as Australia and New Zealand [CANADA?], which face an even greater PRC influence threat against their polities. Just as China seeks to use Australia and New Zealand as a test case for influence operations, the United States can bolster its allies and simultaneously gain experience in working against PRC influence operations at home.

In the end, the final toast given by the Chinese general wasn’t completely untrue — “you understand us.” Asian-Americans, particularly those of the first or 1.5 generation, generally do have a bit more cultural/linguistic fluency when it comes to understanding and dealing with the CCP. One of the subtle satisfactions of working in the U.S. national security apparatus as an Asian-American is seeing the increasing diversity of the military, particularly over the last decade. This satisfaction is not simply representational, but also professional as well: One of the standard lines that the Chinese military likes to use during a disagreement is “you do not understand China!” — a line that has significantly less power when thrown into the faces of the Asian-American military officers or defense experts sitting on the other side of the table. If PRC influence operations are to be countered, then that understanding must be shared across all sectors of U.S. society.

Eric Chan is a China/Korea strategist for the U.S. Air Force’s Checkmate office. Mr. Chan was previously the China, Korea, Philippines, and Vietnam Country Director at the U.S. Air Force’s International Affairs office, responsible for Foreign Military Sales to US allies and for engagement with the Chinese Air Force.

The views expressed in the article are those of the author and do not reflect the official positions of the U.S. Air Force, the Department of Defense, or SecuriFense.

https://thediplomat.com/2019/09/fifth-column-fears-the-chinese-influence-campaign-in-the-united-states/

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3571 on: September 30, 2019, 15:01:01 »
Considering climate change is emerging now as one of the central election points, I'd say it's worthwhile looking at China's part in this, and maybe how its propagation actually works in favour of what is likely China's "grand strategy"

Except for a small portion in Australia, China has possession of just about all the sources of rare earth elements, which are believed to be key in energy storage and technological advancement, technology that is the supposed hope out of this climate change crisis. China has bought up every possible source of this resource around the world, more specifically throughout Africa and South America, where often they are able to leverage host countries through debt traps, ensuring solid control of their natural resources. The massive "belt and road" project are sure signs, too, of the trade routes it intends to use to bring those resources to market. Now, it looks like it's even going after one of the few sources in the Western world, and it's in our backyard

 Trump's recent gaffe over buying Greenland, I think, was merely his old man brain flummoxing something very important about a geopolitical brief he no doubt got on the matter.  I believe this  summary by the Caspian report is a fair estimate of the situation, and why Trump might of said, jokingly or otherwise, that Greenland is for sale; it certainly looks like China might've already beat him to it.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lv9qHzwsvfM

While the Belt and Road project no doubt will service the demand for the natural sources it's pulling from Africa and South America, China has a problem in getting a relatively secure route to bring the resources it's mining in Greenland. But it certainly seems to have a friend in the Liberal Party of Canada, many of them in fact. Recently, even Gen (ret'd) Leslie espoused in China's favour on access through the Northwest passage.
www.theglobeandmail.com/world/article-agreeing-on-the-arctic-why-canada-sides-with-china-over-the-us-on/

Add to it, too, the conflicting message the Liberal old guard is sending behind the scenes, in regards to the Meng Wanzhou extradition hearings
https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/whose-side-is-jean-chretien-on/

And other leveraging, including over 5G
www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/chinas-offensive-on-canada-in-plain-sight/

This situation might look like a win-win, I suppose, to some proponents of fighting climate change through an upheaval of fossil fuel reliance with technological breakthroughs.  That it's China positioning itself to do this, by dominating the world's resources needed to effect this change, doesn't seem to be all that important to Canadians.  To some, the end does justify the means, or maybe nobody is really looking, so long as the investment dollars keep coming. I believe too many are ignoring this situation, especially warnings such as this one at the end of this article
https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/china-silk-road-yellowknife-1.4782123

Quote
If major investments are made in Canada's North by companies where China holds a significant interest, "it is a point of leverage" that China could potentially use to influence domestic policy, according to Lajeunesse...

Schumann said courting Chinese investment means balancing security concerns with a desire to bring money into the territory.
"You've got to remember, these guys have all the money," he said.
"We've got to pay attention to what they're doing — but it's got to line up with, not just what the Northwest Territories, but what Canada wants." 


Too bad nobody wants to talk seriously about foreign policy in Canada, not even during an election
« Last Edit: September 30, 2019, 15:14:27 by Petard »

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3572 on: October 01, 2019, 22:11:30 »
Highlights from the Chinese 70th Anniversary Military parade:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lmp51YN-7wc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aObyRQN4fRQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ofimgaO7Qck

Is it just my imagination or is every Chinese soldier exactly the same height (except for officers who all seem to be five inches shorter than the ORs). On top of that no one needs corrective lenses or a remedial fitness program.

Boy! Is Trump ever going to be jealous when he sees this parade.

 :cheers:
« Last Edit: October 01, 2019, 23:04:55 by FJAG »
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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3573 on: October 01, 2019, 23:40:04 »
One of the missiles seems to have a MIRV capability and could hit US targets in 30 minutes or so. In my book the PRC might have moved to the top of the threat list.

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Re: Chinese Military,Political and Social Superthread
« Reply #3574 on: October 02, 2019, 15:47:51 »
Terry Glavin's super-sharp literary shiv plunged in deep:

Quote
Liberals still kowtowing to China's thugs –– just with a bit more subtlety than usual
Just as nauseating is the surfeit of federal, provincial and municipal politicians who remain deeply integrated and indebted to Beijing's influence-pedlars and corporate lobbyists in Canada.

It was because Justin Trudeau decided to skip the federal leaders’ Munk Debate on Foreign Policy scheduled for this past Tuesday night [Oct. 1] at Roy Thomson Hall in Toronto that the event was called off and quite a few embarrassing questions were avoided. Not least among those questions is this one: In the epic global struggle underway at the moment between totalitarianism and the rest of us, whose side is Canada really on, anyway?

In Hong Kong on Tuesday, police fired 900 rubber bullets, 190 bean bag rounds and roughly 1,400 tear gas canisters at tens of thousands of protesters who somehow managed to find their way to rallies to protest the Chinese Communist Party’s 70th birthday party, despite the city being practically on lockdown with dozens of malls and 11 Metro stations closed. It was the most violent day of civil unrest since the United Kingdom gave Beijing the keys to the city in 1997. The youngest of the 269 Hongkongers arrested was 12. The oldest was 71.

In Beijing, 15,000 troops marched in line with intercontinental ballistic missiles and hypersonic drones from China’s new-warfare airborne armada in Tiananmen Square, filing past a massive parade stand where the megalomaniac Xi Jinping stood waving, dressed in a grey Mao suit. In Hong Kong, among the 74 people aged from 11 to 75 who were hospitalized Tuesday was 18-year-old high school student Tsang Chi-kin, now recovering with a collapsed lung after being shot by police in the chest at point-blank range.

It is bad enough that the Trudeau government’s policy has been to pretend none of this is even happening, and to persist in the catastrophic objective of ever-deeper economic integration with China that has dominated Liberal foreign policy and trade policy for a quarter of a century.

This remains the case despite Beijing’s hostage-taking of the diplomat-on-leave Michael Kovrig and entrepreneur Michael Spavor, and despite Beijing’s crippling embargo on a variety of Canadian agricultural exports, and despite Beijing’s militarization of its ambitious global “belt and road” initiative, the purpose of which Xi Jinping is helpfully explicit about. The point of it all is to disassemble the “rules based international order” that Liberals recite by rote as the wellspring of Canadian prosperity and security since the Second World War.

Just as nauseating is the surfeit of federal, provincial and municipal politicians who remain deeply integrated with and indebted to Beijing’s influence-pedlars and corporate lobbyists in Canada. It is also by rote that they recite the nauseating, predictably self-aggrandizing excuses their make for themselves. It’s always about the need for “dialogue,” and other such point-missing gibberish.


Harjit Sajjan, defence minister in the last government [still is the gov't, he's still the minister], was a guest of honour at a Sept. 22 reception and ceremony in Vancouver celebrating the 70th anniversary of the bloody and tyrannical rule of the Chinese Communist Party. PST

Canadians long ago wised up to this, and so lately the Liberals kowtowing to Beijing prefer to do so quietly, hoping the rest of us won’t notice. Such was the case when it was revealed last weekend that Defence Minister Harjit Sajjan had been a guest of honour at a Sept. 22 reception and ceremony in Vancouver celebrating the 70th anniversary of the bloody and tyrannical rule of the Chinese Communist Party.

In Sajjan’s case, the excuse on offer was that he was attending in his capacity as the Liberal candidate in Vancouver South, and you know, diversity and all that, and besides, he didn’t stay for dinner, and after all, he did say something about how Beijing “needed to address the consular cases” of Kovrig and Spavor. As if these were merely consular cases. As if these excuses absolve Sajjan of the indecency of serving as a photo-opportunity propaganda mannequin for the butchers of Beijing [emphasis added].

In Ottawa on Tuesday, a group of pro-democracy Hongkonger-Canadians were followed and harassed by pro-Beijing thugs as they left their small rally on Parliament Hill. They say they were stalked as their made their way along Wellington Street, blocked from entering O’Connor Street and surrounded until police arrived to escort them into the ByWard Market area. The group Ottawans Stand With HK say they have reported several death threats to Ottawa Police and the RCMP.

Across the country, in Richmond, B.C., the RCMP were called after a group of high school students who put up a “Lennon Wall” at the Aberdeen Skytrain station supporting Hong Kong’s democracy movement were harassed by a group of Beijing supporters who ripped down their display. In Vancouver, at the University of British Columbia, a similar demonstration supporting the Hong Kong protests was attacked by pro-Beijing activists.

All this might have made for some useful context to a real-world crisis with its front lines in the streets of Hong Kong and deep implications for Canadian security and the Canadian economy, had the federal leaders’ foreign-policy debate gone ahead Tuesday night. Instead, the parties exchanged their usual, boring, fact-deficient goads and challenges.

Conservative leader Andrew Scheer announced that he’d cut foreign aid by 25 per cent, redirecting the savings to tax cuts and to sub-Saharan countries in genuine need. But he strayed into fantasy in his claim that more than $2 billion of Canada’s $6 billion foreign-aid outlay goes to “middle and upper-income countries,” some of which are anti-democratic pariahs. Scheer’s announcement could have been grounded in a useful critique of the way the Trudeau government handles its foreign-aid files in police states. But it wasn’t, and it came off instead like a sop to the rednecks and foreign-aid begrudgers who have bolted the Conservative Party for Maxime Bernier’s People Party of Canada.

The Liberals, meanwhile, lathered it on well enough all by themselves. Like this, in an Oct. 1 Liberal Party press release: “Scheer supported capitulation on NAFTA, and now he wants to renegotiate the deal, threatening to plunge Canada’s economy into crippling trade uncertainty.”

That’s something that can be said of Jagmeet Singh’s New Democratic Party, which claims an intention to reopen the United States-Canada-Mexico free trade pact the three countries negotiated to replace NAFTA, following one of U.S. Donald Trump’s tantrums. But it’s not something that can be truthfully said of Scheer’s Conservatives.

Scheer insists, of course, that it was Trudeau who “capitulated” on NAFTA, but on the main Liberal allegation, here’s Scheer, two weeks ago, during a conversation with reporters on the Conservative campaign plane during an overnight flight to Vancouver: “We will proceed with the deal as Justin Trudeau signed it. We will inherit his failure, and we will do everything we can in my term as prime minister to fix the mess he has come back with.”

On foreign policy, the NDP has little to say of any use to anyone. As for the Greens, it’s all climate change, all the time, and fair enough.

The one good thing about the cancellation of the federal leaders’ Munk Debate on foreign policy is that Canadians were spared the embarrassment of watching their federal party leaders make excuses for themselves while the existential struggle for the future of democracy in the world is being fought street by street, mall by mall and plaza by plaza, in the streets of Hong Kong.
https://ottawacitizen.com/opinion/columnists/glavin-liberals-still-kowtowing-to-chinas-thugs-just-with-a-bit-more-subtlety-than-usual

Mark
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