Author Topic: US Army Reserve  (Read 6859 times)

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Offline ~RoKo~

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US Army Reserve
« on: January 13, 2004, 23:43:00 »
I‘ve got some questions about the US Army Reserve in comparison to the Canadian Army Reserve, more specifically regarding deployments.

First and foremost, how do they deploy overseas? Do individual soldiers augment positions in regular units, or are they sent overseas as purely reserve units, i.e. the unit you train with at home is the unit you deploy with when called up?

Further, can individual reservists volunteer to go overseas and augment other units?

Any other bits of information/factoids would be appreciated.

jrhume

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #1 on: January 14, 2004, 16:01:00 »
Korus,

Go to the following link:

 http://www4.army.mil/USAR/home/index.php

I browsed the site for just a few minutes and discovered more information than I could digest.  Answers to most of your questions can probably be found there.

I‘m not a member of the Guard/Reserves but I know a few.

I know the Guard and Reserve units usually do their annual 2-weeks of training as a group, although there seem to be Reservists who serve as individuals.  There‘s more info on the site.

The units frequently deploy overseas for their summer training.  A local SF Reserve unit went to Panama several times, as did a nearby Air National Guard unit that I know about.

Deployments to places like Iraq most often involve entire units or portions of those units.  I‘m not certain of the exact reasons, but several Colorado Guard units were levied for specialists of various types.  These people deployed as small units attached to regular formations.

Many Reservists are called up in times of need to replace regulars within the US and overseas, but not directly into combat areas.  Again, you may find more info on the site.

Individuals can volunteer for active duty.  

There is, to my knowledge, no difference between the pay for regulars and reservists.  Naturally, reserve members are only paid for time on duty for drills or extended service.

That‘s about the extent of what I know or think I know about the Reserves.  Check out the site.

Jim

Offline sinblox

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #2 on: January 14, 2004, 18:15:00 »
What‘s the different in the US between the Army Reserve and the Army National Guard?

Offline East Side Soprano

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #3 on: January 14, 2004, 19:52:00 »
I believe the Army National Guard is made up of soldiers who have previously served in the active duty armed forces. Also, state governors have the power to call up the National Guard in times of emergency (ie. flood, tornado, riots etc.) whereas deployment of reserves needs congressional/presidential approval.

Offline muskrat89

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #4 on: January 14, 2004, 19:53:00 »
OK - I‘m going to butcher this, until Baker or someone else pipes up. My understanding is (speaking in the broadest terms) that the Reserves is more of a training/experience cadre, sorta kinda like our supplementary ready reserve (do they still have that?) Whereas the national Guard, even though they can be mobilized by the Federal Govt, are actually at the disposal of the Governor
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Offline muskrat89

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #5 on: January 14, 2004, 19:54:00 »
ESS - most of that sounded close, except NG troops don‘t necessarily have previous service, to the best of my knowledge
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Offline Infanteer

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #6 on: January 14, 2004, 20:16:00 »
The biggest difference is that the combat units are National Guard, while the Army Reserve units are CSS/specialist units.

As well, National Guard is under the direction of the individual states.  For a good read on National Guard/Army Reserve politics, read Huntington‘s "The Soldier and the State."

Major Sherman will be able to clear this up.
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline East Side Soprano

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #7 on: January 14, 2004, 20:22:00 »
Muskrat,
I pretty sure NG troops do have previous military experience, or at least a good majority does, but I‘m not going to crap all over your theory. Perhaps Major Baker can fill us in.

Cheers.

Offline Infanteer

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #8 on: January 14, 2004, 20:45:00 »
Its amazing what a little research can get you.  This is how rumors get started.  Well, here is the answer.
As for Korus‘ original question, when I‘ve worked with ARNG units on operations, they were deployed togeather, as a unit.  I am unsure if they do individual augmentation.

   
Quote
The Army National Guard (ARNG) is one component of The Army (which consists of the Active Army, the Army National Guard and the Army Reserves.) The Army National Guard is composed primarily of traditional Guardsmen -- civilians who serve their country, state and community on a part-time basis (usually one weekend each month and two weeks during the summer.) Each state, territory and the District of Columbia has its own National Guard, as provided for by the Constitution of the United States.

The National Guard has a unique dual mission that consists of both Federal and State roles. For state missions, the governor, through the state Adjutant General, commands Guard forces. The governor can call the National Guard into action during local or statewide emergencies, such as storms, fires, earthquakes or civil disturbances.

In addition, the President of the United States can activate the National Guard for participation in federal missions. Examples of federal activations include Guard units deployed to Bosnia and Kosovo for stabilization operations and units deployed to the Middle East and other locations in the war on terrorism. When federalized, Guard units are commanded by the Combatant Commander of the theatre in which they are operating.
 
and

   
Quote
The ARNG structure is as follows: 15 enhanced Separate Brigades, eight divisions, and three strategic brigades (31st SAB, 92nd SIB, and the 207th Scout Group). The ARNG also maintains two Special Forces groups (19th and 20th). The force composition of the ARNG is 52 percent combat, 17 percent CS, 22 percent CSS, and 9 percent table of distribution and allowances (TDA) units, typically state headquarters units.  
finally, NO, you do not need prior training

   
Quote
Typically, National Guard members are required to attend one drill weekend each month and one annual training period (usually 2 weeks in the summer) each year. Weekend drills usually consist of one Saturday and Sunday each month, but occasionally include reporting for duty on Friday night. Initially, all non-prior service personnel are required to attend initial entry training (IET), also known as Basic Training. After Basic Training, soldiers go to their Advanced Individual Training (AIT) which teaches them the special skills they will need for their job in the Guard. These schools can usually be scheduled to accommodate civilian job or school constraints.
As for the Army Reserve

 
Quote
The Army Reserve‘s mission, under Title 10 of the U.S. code, is to provide trained and ready Soldiers and units with the critical combat service support and combat support capabilities necessary to support nation strategy during peacetime, contingencies and war. The Army Reserve is a key element in The Army multi-component unit force, training with Active and National Guard units to ensure all three components work as a fully integrated team.  
Yes, it is a support organization

 
Quote
The Army Reserve contributes to the Army‘s Total Force
by providing 100% of the:
Chemical Brigades
Internment Brigades
Judge Advocate General Unit
Medical Groups
Railway Units
Training & Exercise Divisions
Water Supply Battalions
...more than two-thirds of the Army‘s:
Civil Affairs Units
Psychological Operations Units
Transportation Groups
Motor Battalions
Chemical Battalions
Hospitals
Medical Brigades
Theater Signal Commands
...and nearly half of the Army‘s:
Petroleum Battalions
Adjutant General Units
Petroleum Groups
Transportation Command
Terminal Battalions
Public Affairs Units
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr

Offline muskrat89

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #9 on: January 14, 2004, 21:08:00 »
Well, geez - I‘d say I was close. Had a BIL in the reserves; had some friends in the Maine NG

Have had some people try to recruit me into the Guard both in Maine, and here (Arty units of course). They wanted me to take Basic Training again though... that just wasn‘t gonna happen   :warstory:
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Offline ~RoKo~

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2004, 21:08:00 »
Wow! outstanding, thankyou for the replies

jrhume

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #11 on: January 15, 2004, 09:03:00 »
Infanteer,

First rate info.  I didn‘t run into that particular page when searching.

The Reserve site says there is an Individual Augmentation process, but I don‘t know how that works.  

According to the site, there are 192,000 paid Guard/Reserve soldiers.  That‘s folks who actually attend drills and training.  

Jim

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Re: US Army Reserve
« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2004, 11:18:00 »
Well, I just cut and pasted those off the official Army Reserve and National Guard sites, so don‘t give me too much props; it only took my 5 minutes.  Those asking the questions should try that approach first.

PS
Major Baker, great quote...coming from a Frenchman, we know that to be a truth.
"Overall it appears that much of the apparent complexity of modern war stems in practice from the self-imposed complexity of modern HQs" LCol J.P. Storr