Author Topic: 1917  (Read 1867 times)

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Offline kkwd

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1917
« on: November 11, 2019, 12:37:19 »
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: 1917
« Reply #1 on: November 11, 2019, 20:56:03 »
I saw the trailer and it looks good.

Offline Thucydides

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Re: 1917
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2020, 00:07:22 »
Saw 1917, and was impressed by the technical prowess of the director in making the film appear to be a "single shot" (like "Russian ArK". However, I found the story to be somewhat lacking, and felt little connection to the characters. In many ways, it was like watching the greatest training movie ever.

Still enjoyed the experience.
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: 1917
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2020, 00:13:43 »
I saw the film but wasn't wowed by it. Fast and furious is better.

Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: 1917
« Reply #4 on: February 11, 2020, 00:19:12 »
The set design and attention to detail was incredible, in addition to the cinematography.

Character development was minimal, but understandable given the focus of the plot. Nothing was lost in terms of what was expected once the first few minutes played out—the viewer finds out what the purpose is going to be for the characters, and that’s it. The simplicity is underrated.

It’s unusual to use the word beautiful to describe aspects of a “war” movie; but then again, this wasn’t necessarily a movie about war.

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Offline Bread Guy

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Re: 1917
« Reply #5 on: February 11, 2020, 10:04:25 »
Saw 1917, and was impressed by the technical prowess of the director in making the film appear to be a "single shot" (like "Russian ArK".
Another WW1 (truly) single-shot movie about Canadians was "21 Brothers" -- that one felt more like a stage play unfolding on screen.
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Re: 1917
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2020, 10:09:56 »
The premise of the tale and how it all played out was perhaps less than 100% believable, but as a tale, it was told well, and the cinema was very good.

I would consider going back to see it in IMAX.  And I seldom view movies in theater, let alone going to see them twice.

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Offline Journeyman

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Re: 1917
« Reply #7 on: February 11, 2020, 10:32:49 »
I saw the film but wasn't wowed by it. Fast and furious is better.
Absolutely.  'Fast and Furious' is one of the best movies out there, within the category of "Military Literature and Film."   :nod:

Offline Blackadder1916

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Re: 1917
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2020, 10:45:23 »
Better than "Passchendaele".
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Re: 1917
« Reply #9 on: February 11, 2020, 11:34:00 »
Better than "Passchendaele".

That's where my grandfather was wounded with the Canadian Expeditionary Force (CEF) in 1917.

''I died in hell - They called it Passchendaele''.

Siegfried Sassoon.

In any war, there are two tremendous tasks. That of the combat troops is to fight the enemy. That of the supply troops is to furnish all the material to insure victory. The faster and farther the combat troops advance against the foe, the greater becomes the battle of supply. EISENHOWER

Offline BeyondTheNow

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Re: 1917
« Reply #10 on: February 11, 2020, 11:49:12 »
The premise of the tale and how it all played out was perhaps less than 100% believable, but as a tale, it was told well, and the cinema was very good...

Yes. For those unfamiliar, this article sheds light on inspiration for the film.

I neglected to mention scoring also. ‘Perfect complement to the scenes of building suspense (much like Dunkirk) and action sequences.

Quote
Is 1917 a true story? First World War background and historical accuracy of the Oscar-nominated Sam Mendes film

The film takes place during Operation Alberich, a German military withdrawal to stronger positions in northern France...

... 1917 is something of a true story, loosely based on a tale the director's grandfather - Alfred H. Mendes, who served with the British Army during the First World War - told him as a child.

The film takes place in April of 1917 during Operation Alberich - a historically accurate German military withdrawal to stronger positions in northern France.

"The story of 1917 was inspired not only by my own family history, but also by many others," the latter day Mendes told genealogy company Ancestry, who delved into the events of the film and uncovered the military records of the director’s grandfather.

Alfred Mendes was a man of small stature, and so was chosen to be a messenger on the Western Front due to the relative nimbleness his slight frame allowed.

He was awarded the Military Medal after he volunteered for a dangerous mission to locate injured soldiers scattered across No-Mans Land during the Battle of Passchendaele.

"I hope very much that the stories of those that came before us and fought on our behalf live on in our movie,” said Sam Mendes.

1917 also has real life connections to lead actor George MacKay, whose character in the film is tasked with delivering a message deep in enemy territory.

That's a mission not too dissimilar from one MacKay’s three times great uncle, Albert Victor Baulk, undertook himself.

Albert was a signaller for the 196th Siege Battery in Sailly-au-Bois, France, just a few miles from the German front lines where Operation Alberich took place

As a signaller and telephonist, Albert would have helped relay crucial communications to his unit, just like MacKay’s character.

When the Germans withdrew, Albert’s unit subsequently mobilised and attacked the enemy’s position at Arras, providing artillery fire to support attacking troops.

The war diary for his unit notes the following:

"196 SB [Siege Battery] Task – bombardment of trenches and strong points ahead of RFA [Royal Field Artillery] barrage, concluding with a creeping barrage covering advance of 4th Dragoons along SCARPE Valley."

More at link:

https://inews.co.uk/culture/film/1917-true-story-film-historical-accuracy-first-world-war-sam-mendes-1358467

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Re: 1917
« Reply #11 on: February 11, 2020, 13:05:23 »
I seldom view movies in theater,

Neither do I, anymore.

I used to love going to our local theatre. It was in the village within walking distance from the house. It was one of those old "atmospheric" movie palaces that transported you to an exotic place, even before the picture started. It had an "open air" feeling. The ceiling was painted sky blue, Tiny light bulbs resembled stars. Images were projected to create a cloud-like effect. As if you were in a forest under a night sky. The interior walls were Spanish style, with ivory stucco and gold leaf. Uniformed ushers.

It closed in 1999 and was turned into a drug store.

Haven't seen 1917 yet, but guess I'll get around to it.

In any war, there are two tremendous tasks. That of the combat troops is to fight the enemy. That of the supply troops is to furnish all the material to insure victory. The faster and farther the combat troops advance against the foe, the greater becomes the battle of supply. EISENHOWER