Author Topic: QAnon Conspriacy theory  (Read 9257 times)

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #25 on: July 03, 2020, 18:42:07 »
Looks like our recent intruder at Rideau Hall may have been a follower of QAnon.
Extracts from a today's Toronto Star;

Quote
In March, just as the COVID-19 lockdowns began, the Grindhouse Instagram account featured a post about “going down the rabbit hole” into QAnon conspiracy theories.

Quote
“Has anyone else been following ‘Q’ and the ‘White Rabbit’ down the rabbit hole and how this all relates the Corona virus (sic)/COVID-19 situation?” reads a March 27 post on Grindhouse Fine Foods’ Instagram account.

“Lots of coincidences in all these ‘Q’ posts if this turns out to be a ‘nothingburger’.”

Attached to the post were a series of hashtags, referencing debunked conspiracy theories.

Grindhouse Fine Meats is the business owned by Hurran
.
Complete article can be found here.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #26 on: August 19, 2020, 19:33:07 »
Trump praises the group:

Quote
Trump praises QAnon conspiracists, appreciates support

President Donald Trump on Wednesday praised the supporters of QAnon, a convoluted, pro-Trump conspiracy theory, and suggested he appreciates their support of his candidacy.

Speaking during a press conference at the White House, Trump courted the support of those who put stock in the conspiracy theory, saying, “I heard that these are people that love our country.” It was his first public comment on the subject.

...


https://apnews.com/535e145ee67dd757660157be39d05d3f
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #27 on: August 19, 2020, 20:56:55 »
Bunch of raving lunatics...
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #28 on: August 24, 2020, 16:26:25 »
Russia is now boosting QAnon conspiracy theories:

Quote
Russian-backed organizations amplifying QAnon conspiracy theories, researchers say

Russian government-supported organizations are playing a small but increasing role amplifying conspiracy theories promoted by QAnon, raising concerns of interference in the November U.S. election.

Academics who study QAnon said there were no signs Russia had a hand in the early days of the movement, which launched in 2017 with anonymous web postings amplified by YouTube videos.

But as QAnon gained adherents and took on new topics - with President Donald Trump as the constant hero waging a misunderstood battle - social media accounts tied to a key Kremlin ally joined in.

...


https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-qanon-russia/russian-backed-organizations-amplifying-qanon-conspiracy-theories-researchers-say-idUSKBN25K13T
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #29 on: August 26, 2020, 19:32:45 »
According to Wiki, so far the only real success the group appears to have had is gunning down a mob boss, by a guy convinced that Trump had his back. On the bright side lunatics gunning for organized crime might put some fear into the mob guys for a change.

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #30 on: August 26, 2020, 19:55:32 »
"Let's you and him fight..."
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Offline OceanBonfire

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #32 on: September 14, 2020, 15:56:09 »
QAnon, conspiracy theories, right wing/far-right, and anti-mask advocacy go hand in hand:

Quote
https://apnews.com/35a881fb3e95ff8421efe57d05a5c374

https://apnews.com/35a881fb3e95ff8421efe57d05a5c374

Quote
QAnon conspiracy theorists, far-right group join Vancouver anti-mask rally

https://globalnews.ca/news/7332529/vancouver-anti-mask-rally-qanon/
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #33 on: September 14, 2020, 16:51:05 »
QAnon, conspiracy theories, right wing/far-right, and anti-mask advocacy go hand in hand:

Can't dock him Milpoints just because he posted an article RELATED TO THE THREAD   :-\   LOL

I got you Bonfire, evened it out the best I could    :cheers:
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #34 on: September 14, 2020, 17:05:42 »
QAnon, conspiracy theories, right wing/far-right, and anti-mask advocacy go hand in hand:


Several hundred!!??  OMG, every right wing person in Canada was there...….what a crock.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #35 on: September 14, 2020, 17:29:22 »
Can't dock him Milpoints just because he posted an article RELATED TO THE THREAD   :-\   LOL

I got you Bonfire, evened it out the best I could    :cheers:

I docked because OceanBonfire stated "QAnon, conspiracy theories, right wing/far-right, and anti-mask advocacy go hand in hand". 

In other words, if you don't believe wearing a cloth mask or homemade bandana will protect you and others from a virus, you're a nut like these people. 

This is how we got to: "if you disagree with me, you must be a racist/misogynist/etc" in today's highly divisive environment.  This is just to shut down discussion.  That is why the neg MP.     





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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #36 on: September 14, 2020, 17:47:27 »
Keep in mind that we have a full generation of people becoming adults who grew up on a steady stream of Hollywood made movies that portrayed vast conspiracies, which requires the hero or little guy to fight back. So they have been conditioned to believe in conspiracies.

To be fair I believe there are multiple attempts to create conspiracies, but they all fall foul of human nature, greed, laziness, ego and pure stupidity.   

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #37 on: September 14, 2020, 18:48:03 »
For anyone interested in what Trump had to say on the subject,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/QAnon#Responses_by_Donald_Trump
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #38 on: September 14, 2020, 19:01:10 »
A recent Time article that looks at how QAnon conspiracy theories have affected US politics.

Quote
How Conspiracy Theories Are Shaping the 2020 Election—and Shaking the Foundation of American Democracy

BY CHARLOTTE ALTER/KENOSHA, WIS.
 
SEPTEMBER 10, 2020 6:26 AM EDT

Kelly Ferro is a busy mom on her way to the post office: leather mini-backpack, brunet topknot, turquoise pedicure with a matching ombré manicure. A hairdresser from Kenosha, Wis., Ferro didn’t vote in 2016 but has since become a strong supporter of Donald Trump. “Why does the news hate the President so much?” she says. “I went down the rabbit hole. I started doing a lot of research.”

When I ask what she means by research, something shifts. Her voice has the same honey tone as before, and her face is as friendly as ever. But there’s an uncanny flash as she says, “This is where I don’t know what I can say, because what’s integrated into our system, it stems deep. And it has to do with really corrupt, evil, dark things that have been hidden from the public. Child sex trafficking is one of them.”

Ferro may not have even realized it, but she was parroting elements of the QAnon conspiracy theory, a pro-Trump viral delusion that began in 2017 and has spread widely over recent months, migrating from far-right corners of the Internet to infect ordinary voters in the suburbs. Its followers believe President Trump is a hero safeguarding the world from a “deep state” cabal of Satan-worshipping pedophiles, Democratic politicians and Hollywood celebrities who run a global sex-trafficking ring, harvesting the blood of children for life-sustaining chemicals.

None of this is even remotely true. But an alarming number of Americans have been exposed to these wild ideas. There are thousands of QAnon groups and pages on Facebook, with millions of members, according to an internal company document reviewed by NBC News. Dozens of QAnon-friendly candidates have run for Congress, and at least three have won GOP primaries. Trump has called its adherents “people that love our country.”

In more than seven dozen interviews conducted in Wisconsin in early September, from the suburbs around Milwaukee to the scarred streets of Kenosha in the aftermath of the Jacob Blake shooting, about 1 in 5 voters volunteered ideas that veered into the realm of conspiracy theory, ranging from QAnon to the notion that COVID-19 is a hoax. Two women in Ozaukee County calmly informed me that an evil cabal operates tunnels under the U.S. in order to rape and torture children and drink their blood. A Joe Biden supporter near a Kenosha church told me votes don’t matter, because “the elites” will decide the outcome of the election anyway. A woman on a Kenosha street corner explained that Democrats were planning to bring in U.N. troops before the election to prevent a Trump win.

It’s hard to know exactly why people believe what they believe. Some had clearly been exposed to QAnon conspiracy theorists online. Others seemed to be repeating false ideas espoused in Plandemic, a pair of conspiracy videos featuring a discredited former medical researcher that went viral, spreading the notion that COVID-19 is a hoax across social media. (COVID-19 is not a hoax.) When asked where they found their information, almost all these voters were cryptic: “Go online,” one woman said. “Dig deep,” added another. They seemed to share a collective disdain for the mainstream media–a skepticism that has only gotten stronger and deeper since 2016. The truth wasn’t reported, they said, and what was reported wasn’t true.

This matters not just because of what these voters believe but also because of what they don’t. The facts that should anchor a sense of shared reality are meaningless to them; the news developments that might ordinarily inform their vote fall on deaf ears. They will not be swayed by data on coronavirus deaths, they won’t be persuaded by job losses or stock market gains, and they won’t care if Trump called America’s fallen soldiers “losers” or “suckers,” as the Atlantic reported, because they won’t believe it. They are impervious to messaging, advertising or data. They aren’t just infected with conspiracy; they appear to be inoculated against reality.

Democracy relies on an informed and engaged public responding in rational ways to the real-life facts and challenges before us. But a growing number of Americans are untethered from that. “They’re not on the same epistemological grounding, they’re not living in the same worlds,” says Whitney Phillips, a professor at Syracuse who studies online disinformation. “You cannot have a functioning democracy when people are not at the very least occupying the same solar system.”

American politics has always been prone to spasms of conspiracy. The historian Richard Hofstadter famously called it “an arena for angry minds.” In the late 18th and early 19th centuries, Americans were convinced that the Masons were an antigovernment conspiracy; populists in the 1890s warned of the “secret cabals” controlling the price of gold; in the 20th century, McCarthyism and the John Birch Society fueled a wave of anti-Communist delusions that animated the right. More recently, Trump helped seed a racist lie that President Barack Obama was not born in the U.S.

As a candidate in 2016, Trump seemed to promote a new wild conspiracy every week, from linking Ted Cruz’s father to the Kennedy assassination to suggesting Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia was murdered. In interviews at Trump rallies that year, I heard voters espouse all manner of delusions: that the government was run by drug cartels; that Obama was a foreign-born Muslim running for a third term; that Hillary Clinton had Vince Foster killed. But after four years of a Trump presidency, the paranoia is no longer relegated to the margins of society. According to the Pew Research Center, 25% of Americans say there is some truth to the conspiracy theory that the COVID-19 pandemic was intentionally planned. (Virologists, global health officials and U.S. intelligence and national-security officials have all dismissed the idea that the pandemic was human-engineered, although Trump Administration officials have said they have not ruled out the possibility that it was the result of an accident in a lab.) In a recent poll of nearly 1,400 people by left-leaning Civiqs/Daily Kos, more than half of Republican respondents believed some part of QAnon: 33% said they believed the conspiracy was “mostly true,” while 26% said “some parts” are true.

Over a week of interviews in early September, I heard baseless conspiracies from ordinary Americans in parking lots and boutiques and strip malls from Racine to Cedarburg to Wauwatosa, Wis. Shaletha Mayfield, a Biden supporter from Racine, says she thinks Trump created COVID-19 and will bring it back again in the fall. Courtney Bjorn, a Kenosha resident who voted for Clinton in 2016 and plans to vote for Biden, lowered her voice as she speculated about the forces behind the destruction in her city. “No rich people lost their buildings,” she says. “Who benefits when neighborhoods burn down?”

But by far the greatest delusions I heard came from voters on the right. More than a third of the Trump supporters I spoke with voiced some kind of conspiratorial thinking. “COVID could have been released by communist China to bring down our economy,” says John Poulos, loading groceries into his car outside Sendik’s grocery store in the Milwaukee suburb of Wauwatosa. “COVID was manufactured,” says Maureen Bloedorn, walking into a Dollar Tree in Kenosha. She did not vote for Trump in 2016 but plans to support him in November, in part because “he sent Obama a bill for all of his vacations he took on the American dime.” This idea was popularized by a fake news story that originated on a satirical website and went viral.

On a cigarette break outside their small business in Ozaukee County, Tina Arthur and Marcella Frank told me they plan to vote for Trump again because they are deeply alarmed by “the cabal.” They’ve heard “numerous reports” that the COVID-19 tents set up in New York and California were actually for children who had been rescued from underground sex-trafficking tunnels.

Arthur and Frank explained they’re not followers of QAnon. Frank says she spends most of her free time researching child sex trafficking, while Arthur adds that she often finds this information on the Russian-owned search engine Yandex. Frank’s eyes fill with tears as she describes what she’s found: children who are being raped and tortured so that “the cabal” can “extract their blood and drink it.” She says Trump has seized the blood on the black market as part of his fight against the cabal. “I think if Biden wins, the world is over, basically,” adds Arthur. “I would honestly try to leave the country. And if that wasn’t an option, I would probably take my children and sit in the garage and turn my car on and it would be over.”

The rise in conspiratorial thinking is the product of several interrelated trends: declining trust in institutions; demise of local news; a social-media environment that makes rumor easy to spread and difficult to debunk; a President who latches onto anything and anyone he thinks will help his political fortunes. It’s also a part of our wiring. “The brain likes crazy,” says Nicco Mele, the former director of Harvard’s Shorenstein Center, who studies the spread of online disinformation and conspiracies. Because of this, experts say, algorithms on platforms like Facebook and YouTube are designed to serve up content that reinforces existing beliefs–learning what users search for and feeding them more and more extreme content in an attempt to keep them on their sites.

All this madness contributes to a political imbalance. On the right, conspiracy theories make Trump voters even more loyal to the President, whom many see as a warrior against enemies in the “deep state.” It also protects him against an October surprise, as no matter what news emerges about Trump, a growing group of U.S. voters simply won’t believe it. On the left, however, conspiracy theories often weaken voters’ allegiance to Biden by making them less likely to trust the voting process. If they believe their votes won’t matter because shadowy elites are pulling the country’s strings, why bother going through the trouble of casting a ballot?

Experts who follow disinformation say nothing will change until Facebook and YouTube shift their business model away from the algorithms that reward conspiracies. “We are not anywhere near peak crazy,” says Mele. Phillips, the professor from Syracuse, agrees that things will get weirder. “We’re in trouble,” she adds. “Words sort of fail to capture what a nightmare scenario this is.”

But to voters like Kelly Ferro, the mass delusion seems more like a mass awakening. Trump “is revealing these things,” she says serenely, gesturing with her turquoise-tipped fingernails. Americans’ “eyes are being opened to the darkness that was once hidden.”

After yoga in the morning, Ferro says, she often spends hours watching videos, immersing herself in a world she believes is bringing her ever closer to the truth. “You can’t stop, because it’s so addicting to have this knowledge of what kind of world we’re living in,” she says. “We’re living in an alternate reality.”

With reporting by Leslie Dickstein and Simmone Shah

This appears in the September 21, 2020 issue of TIME.

Link

Reminds me of the 80s when the "Satanist" scare was the big boogeyman of the day.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #39 on: September 15, 2020, 01:36:00 »
Feh, who needs QAnon when they've got Roman Polanski and Jeffrey Epstein and all the people who hang around in circles where access to underage women is one of the perqs.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #40 on: September 15, 2020, 07:23:34 »
QAnon, conspiracy theories, right wing/far-right, and anti-mask advocacy go hand in hand:

The anti-mask tantrum on Parliament Hill on August 29th was an interesting mix of this. Heavy mix of anti-maskers, general anti-government/conspiracy types, and several ‘qanon’ posters and banners. MAGA/Trump flags were being flown. La Meute and other far right groups were in evidence. Maxime Bernier’s speech to the crowd was apparently a hit.

So yeah, it’s fair game and factual to point to there being noticeable cross pollination between the groups / movements identified.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #41 on: September 15, 2020, 08:30:48 »
Several hundred!!??  OMG, every right wing person in Canada was there...….what a crock.

I don't care about their politics.  I don't even really care if they're anti-vaxxers or anti-maskers.  But 700 people who believe that there is a secret cabal of child sex traffickers (mostly made up of Hollywood stars and the Democratic party) and who believe Trump is going to save us all, is 700 too many for me.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #42 on: September 15, 2020, 13:17:17 »
I don't care about their politics.  I don't even really care if they're anti-vaxxers or anti-maskers.  But 700 people who believe that there is a secret cabal of child sex traffickers (mostly made up of Hollywood stars and the Democratic party) and who believe Trump is going to save us all, is 700 too many for me.

Well according to Wiki over 4200 Canadians voted for the Communist Party, I guess after some 50 million dead globally they eventually get it right.....

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #43 on: September 15, 2020, 14:45:29 »
Well according to Wiki over 4200 Canadians voted for the Communist Party, I guess after some 50 million dead globally they eventually get it right.....

50 million is on the low side.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #44 on: September 15, 2020, 16:03:39 »
I know, estimates under Mao alone vary from 20-80 million depending on source, I purposely used the low side, but staggering nevertheless when you consider how recent the concept of Marxism/Communism is.

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #45 on: September 15, 2020, 20:02:21 »
Hey focus here guys,....only Donald Trump is evil now.
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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #46 on: September 16, 2020, 08:38:46 »
I am guessing that Republican strategists who have studied modern history may be hoping the party will distance itself a little bit from Q.

They likely remember the John Birch Society and the 1964 presidential election. It did not end well for the Republicans.
« Last Edit: September 16, 2020, 08:49:01 by mariomike »

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #47 on: September 16, 2020, 21:46:50 »
I am guessing that Republican strategists who have studied modern history may be hoping the party will distance itself a little bit from Q.

I am confident that most veteran Republican strategists wish that QAnon never became a thing, much like they never wanted Trump to be their candidate in 2016. Now to be fair, I don't think anyone foresaw such a decentralized online conspiracy theory becoming such a powerful and enduring force (especially given how often "he" gives specific details of upcoming events that turn out to be plain wrong). I also believe that the GOP are now lying in the bed they've made, as both Trump and QAnon were only made possible as an unintended result of decades of GOP social strategy. I think though that the GOP's greatest issue with QAnon is not that the conspiracy theory has taken over large swaths of the conservative voter base who now follow it with fervor, but rather that they are unable to control it.

The modern GOP has always relied on stoking fear within the populace to foster a reliable voting base (note I am not saying that this applies to all GOP voters, but certainly a significant number). The specific targets of that fear have changed over time, but the strategy generally relies on demonizing an "other" who will supposedly come to destroy voters' way of life, and is often portrayed to be more powerful and influential than they truly are. See: Blacks, gays, communists (or whomever could be conveniently accused of being a communist during McCarthyism and the Red Scare), hippies/anti-war folk, Satanists, Muslims, transgender persons, Mexicans/Latin Americans, Antifa, BLM, etc.

Traditionally, that fear could be stoked strategically by way of coordinated (or at least semi-coordinated) messaging through specific avenues such as AM radio shock jocks, certain Evangelical preachers, Rush Limbaugh, the evening Fox News propaganda crew of Hannity/Ingraham/Carlson, etc. It was almost always framed in a US conservatives vs. the World way, but importantly always had the GOP as the defenders of the US conservative way of life.

Unfortunately for the GOP elite, the rise of Trump the populist has caused these sentiments of voter fear and anger to take on a life of their own. Trump came onto the scene as a fringe candidate, and wasted no time in capitalizing on this fear and anger with aggressive and inflammatory populist sentiments to get the nomination. Other than by stoking social and racial tensions (i.e. "telling it like it is", or more pessimistically "he hates the same people that I do"), how else could a New York City elitist who lives in a giant gold-plated tower in downtown Manhattan possibly make inroads as the anointed saviour of the US working class?

Trumpism has spawned a political orthodoxy among US conservatives unlike anything else I know of in US history. While this has always existed within politics to some extent (see for example the popularity of RINO accusations in the past), never before has an huge segment of the voting population delegated their political opinions on a topic or person so directly to whatever Trump says or tweets. How many members of Trump's former senior advisors or members of his cabinet have gone from being considered courageous "swamp-drainers" to members of the "Deep State" or "never-Trumpers" just by virtue of being fired or publicly criticizing Trump?

QAnon and Trumpist orthodoxy are symbiotic, and I really don't think that one can be viewed without the other. Trumpism capitalizes on voter fear and anger. QAnon is popular as an explanation for Trump's "Deep State" rhetoric, and also provides explanations for many of the seemingly illogical statements and actions that Trump makes, and also reassures adherents that there is a deep master plan unfolding that can't be revealed just yet (soon though, promise). The nature of conspiracy theory and online grassroots QAnon communities on social media provide regular positive feedback loops for voters who have hitched their horse to the idea that right and wrong are a question of whatever Trump's position on the matter is.

I am confident that QAnon will remain popular for at least as long as Trump is in office, and will likely continue to inspire infrequent acts of lone-wolf political violence by it's framing of Trump against an embedded Deep State of pedophiles and Satan-worshipers. I am not sure where the conspiracy theory will go once Trump is gone. Will it die out, or has Trumpism irreversibly changed the GOP which will allow QAnon or something like it to remain a powerful social force moving forward? Social media memes like the attached picture are in my opinion indicative of a political movement that has no guarantee of dying out following Trump's departure from office.
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Online Brad Sallows

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Re: QAnon Conspriacy theory
« Reply #48 on: September 17, 2020, 00:27:11 »
People are opportunistic and take advantage of what is available, which creates the illusion of symbioses and relationships that are ultimately just about what A can get from B (and vice versa) while it remains possible.  All political camps have out-groups they demonize.  Conspiracy theories about how the rich and powerful geo there and stay there are timeless.  Variations of "blood libels" (Jews, witches, goodness knows who else) have been around a long time.  Sexual exploitation is as old as the species.

In the absence of social media, QAnon would have about as much impact as the Illuminati - something most people might have vaguely heard of, often treated as a joke.  Whatever the media wants to hammer 24/7 to score political points is not necessarily something of real import or impact.

When Trump is gone there will still be progressive and conservative populists.  The libertarians and mainstream conservatives will still be interested in preserving the fundamentals of American governmental organization and culture.  The neocons will still be all alone in the unoccupied centre that was vacated as the political left receded further into the distance and will have to find someone new on whom to vent their frustrations.

Many elements of conspiracy theories are just exaggerations of mundane problems; the problem is that those exaggerations camouflage the mundane problems.
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