Author Topic: The Woodworking Thread  (Read 6436 times)

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Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #75 on: September 01, 2017, 16:36:25 »
Thanks guys, that's a pretty handy setup, I hadn't thought of using the router for that; I can definitely build that jig up and use it for a few projects I have in mind, and finish it off with a nice old hand planer I inherited.  With a sacrificial strip on the edges that would be a quick way to plane the cutting board, and also need a workbench that's higher up so I don't hunch over all the time (which is probably karma for laughing at short friends while going through engineering school who are keeping the design height at 5'6" for everything).

I was more looking at the wood carving grinder bits as well, but the planer attachment would be handy for flattening an area on a carving I guess.  I've seen some pretty interesting carvings made up with layered plywood blocks and thought that the grinder carving wheel would be a good way to play around with that a bit.

Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #76 on: December 03, 2017, 14:46:08 »
Time for a bit of an update:

I'm finally rolling in the shop. I have the dust extractor going, the cyclone works like a charm, and I made another unit to collect planer shavings - because a DW 735 chucks 'em like nobody's business.

In various stages of development right now:
-shoe storage/bench with a live edge maple top.
-several tables from reclaimed red cedar.
-another live edge bench to be married with smithed iron.
-a big frigging slab of birch.
-table/bar top made from ripped and side profiled birch ply, which I am really amped to get done.

Why I am really here today: I have a Jos Cote 119 bandsaw and I am pretty much out of options asking for anything written on the thing. Even a schematic would be better than what I have, which is SFA. The thing belonged to my grandfather and has not run in at least 15 years, but still turns true and easily. Some of the guides will need work, and the whole thing needs to be stripped and painted, but it's too nostalgic to sell, and it's a 19 inch and those, brand new, ain't cheap.

Anyone? Bueller?

Cheers
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Offline Pusser

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #77 on: December 04, 2017, 11:52:21 »
Time for a bit of an update:

I'm finally rolling in the shop. I have the dust extractor going, the cyclone works like a charm, and I made another unit to collect planer shavings - because a DW 735 chucks 'em like nobody's business.

In various stages of development right now:
-shoe storage/bench with a live edge maple top.
-several tables from reclaimed red cedar.
-another live edge bench to be married with smithed iron.
-a big frigging slab of birch.
-table/bar top made from ripped and side profiled birch ply, which I am really amped to get done.

Why I am really here today: I have a Jos Cote 119 bandsaw and I am pretty much out of options asking for anything written on the thing. Even a schematic would be better than what I have, which is SFA. The thing belonged to my grandfather and has not run in at least 15 years, but still turns true and easily. Some of the guides will need work, and the whole thing needs to be stripped and painted, but it's too nostalgic to sell, and it's a 19 inch and those, brand new, ain't cheap.

Anyone? Bueller?

Cheers

Band saws are likely one of the simplest machine tools and they haven't changed much from inception.  Furthermore, although they're certainly not all identical, I would argue that they're all similar enough that generic instructions are all you should need.  There are plenty of books (and I would assume YouTube videos on how to maintain and tune band saws of any variety).  For the most part, a band saw consists of two wheels. The drive wheel is generally fixed, so the only maintenance you should need would be to the motor.  The other wheel is a little trickier in that it has adjustments:  The tension adjustment moves the wheel up and down to increase/decrease the tension on the blade.  Correct blade tension is important because if it's too tight, you risk snapping the blade and if it's too loose, the blade can drift or even fall off.  Many band saws actually have a tally plate telling you how tight the blade should be (tension varies with blade size).  The other adjustment is for centering the blade on the wheels.  This is simply a matter of tilting the wheel towards or away from the front until the blade is centered on the wheel.  I recommend turning the wheels by hand to do this initially and then checking it with the motor running.  With a little practice, you can get quite proficient with this.

All in all, a band saw is a great tool.  It cuts smoothly because the blade is always going in the same direction.  It's great for curved cuts (much better than a scroll saw), but can't really do an inside cut unless you have the skills to re-weld the blade.  The biggest downside I see is that a truly straight cut is difficult to achieve and that you can't really sharpen the blade.  It also has the advantage of forcing all the sawdust downward where it is easily collected by a dust collection system and less likely to be processed through your lungs.
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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #78 on: December 04, 2017, 12:57:27 »
Thanks for your input. This had been my fallback, under the assumption that generic would do. I did know most of the operating of one, having used them long ago - and it's pretty intuitive just looking. Thankfully there's also a load of info out there re: blade tensioning as well as drive belt tensioning/rpm.

My super last ditch effort was to email a distant cousin who owns several lumber type operations and who may actually still have one of these.

If I need parts is where it might get scary, but a Canadian woodworking forum indicates that some are interchangeable with a little modification.

This will be a winter long project and I can't wait to see end results. It will more than handle everything I could ever want to do with it.
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