Author Topic: The Woodworking Thread  (Read 6581 times)

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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #50 on: July 25, 2017, 09:05:02 »
Pretty sweet looking!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #51 on: July 31, 2017, 07:39:15 »
I've got my first issue with DeWalt. Several emails and no joy.

I got the 618 combo kit and noticed that the base for the Lee Valley sign template baseplate barely hangs on. So I asked DW if they can sort this. Got the bog standard reply that I have to send the unit, brand hammer new BTW, to Quebec to have it evaluated. Not cool. Given that these screws are likely a dime apiece, I asked if they'd just send me longer screws to spec - I mean, I don't want to void warranty or anything like that.

Nothing since.

Bit of a piss off considering the money I spent on this unit. Guess I'll thread match and go buy my own, and keep dollars in reserve for a tap and die set.
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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #52 on: July 31, 2017, 11:06:43 »
Sounds like more of a Lee Valley problem. I notice that they do offer a package of 3/4 inch screws for base plates. It may be easier to spend the $6.50 on the screws than torment yourself over a repair.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #53 on: July 31, 2017, 12:50:09 »
Yeah, I am fine with it but was a little torqued that DW provided a set of screws that might grab three threads for their base.

The kit came with two sets of screws, neither of which fit the 618. And yeah, the base plate is a honking beat thick like.

End of the day I'll likely go and match thread pattern myself and have a bash - as you said, $6.50

Just pisses me off tho!
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Offline Pusser

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #54 on: August 01, 2017, 15:38:17 »
Yup.

Circular saw, chop saw (the one I'll sell at some point soon), recip saw, router, and a bunch of non-powered stuff all financed by home renos.

Re: Mastercraft: I am fond of their hand tools with the exception of hammers, can't beat the warranty. I also have a flooring nailer from them that has served me well so far - and will again very soon!

One of the things I have been reading a lot on lately is butterfly inlays. I am likely going to suck out and order a template and then tackle buying bushings to go and practice. Since I work a lot with planks, I need to prevent end splits. In fact, I think my last load - about 30 three foot two inch thick slabs meant to do salmon but left unused - might be lost due to me not properly treating the ends before drying them. >:( Good lesson. Thankfully I have some ideas of how to use the (now) scrap: http://www.instructables.com/id/Scrap-Wood-End-Grain-End-Table-How-to-Build/

Instructables.com: rabbit hole indeed.

I find this kit (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=41779&cat=1,43000,51208,41779)  from Lee Valley works quite well for simple inlay work.

As for dust collection, I recommend investing in an actual dust collection system.  I find that when you try to adapt a tool, or multiple tools into some sort of Heath Robinson contraption, you spend a lot of time tweaking it to get it to work and then when you need that tool to do something else, you end up having to dismantle everything.  You reach a point where you don't bother doing some things, just because they're such a pain in the ***.  Having said that, I turned my single stage dust collector into a two stage dust collector, simply by adding a cyclone attachment (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=30282&cat=1,42401) and a garbage can.  I only need to empty this periodically and I end up with a can full of ships/shavings and bag full of dust.  This frees up my shop-vac for other things and makes it readily usable.  For airborne dust particles, I have one of these (http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=30278&cat=1,42401,30278) hanging from my ceiling.  It really cuts down on the overall dust coverage of your shop.

Although Lee Valley is an amazing source, it can be expensive.  You can often find lesser quality (yet cheaper and adequate) knock-offs at other places like Busy Bee Tools.  I try to buy the best quality I can afford in precision tools, but I'm willing to drop my standards considerably for the lesser precision stuff.  For example, my dust collector is a "Craftex" that I got at Busy Bee, but my thickness planer is Makita.  I would normally consider a band saw to be a precision tool, but I took a chance on a "Can-Wood" from Busy Bee and have been very happy with it.
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Offline Good2Golf

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #55 on: August 01, 2017, 16:00:46 »
I've got my first issue with DeWalt. Several emails and no joy.

I got the 618 combo kit and noticed that the base for the Lee Valley sign template baseplate barely hangs on. So I asked DW if they can sort this. Got the bog standard reply that I have to send the unit, brand hammer new BTW, to Quebec to have it evaluated. Not cool. Given that these screws are likely a dime apiece, I asked if they'd just send me longer screws to spec - I mean, I don't want to void warranty or anything like that.

Nothing since.

Bit of a piss off considering the money I spent on this unit. Guess I'll thread match and go buy my own, and keep dollars in reserve for a tap and die set.

CanTire has a good set that is always going on 75% off, every couple of months.   

Oh look!  70-piece set is $159.99 $47.99 this week.  70% off.  Go. To. Store. Now.  ;D

Cheers
Duey

p.s. I have this one, Scott and it does everything I need it too.  I have never seen the Maximum titanium-coated sets on sale.

Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #56 on: August 01, 2017, 16:30:36 »
Yeah, I have to look into one for threading black iron pipe in the future - paying someone else to do that is lunacy, the stuff is already pricey!

I am gaining some ground with DeWalt. They followed me on Twitter because, apparently, my emails aren't getting through.

I'm not home for another week, so hopefully the sale lasts!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #57 on: August 01, 2017, 16:38:07 »
Yeah, I have to look into one for threading black iron pipe in the future - paying someone else to do that is lunacy, the stuff is already pricey!

Check out Princess Auto for threading kits for Black iron pipe.....really reasonable...
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #58 on: August 01, 2017, 16:50:12 »
Check out Princess Auto for threading kits for Black iron pipe.....really reasonable...

Oooooh! Me likey!
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Offline ModlrMike

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #59 on: August 01, 2017, 19:03:48 »
Depending on how much threading you need done, they'll often do it at the store when you buy the pipe.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #60 on: August 02, 2017, 06:43:20 »
Depending on how much threading you need done, they'll often do it at the store when you buy the pipe.

Yeah, been there previous with projects. Could have been the small town I was in at the time, but there was a charge for it - likely because I am not talking huge numbers. For fifty bucks I can thread three sizes right at home, that ain't bad.

Material is kind of hard to sort, I don't imagine industrial suppliers have caught on to guys like me using this stuff decoratively ;D
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #61 on: August 02, 2017, 10:11:04 »
Virtually all tools go on sale at Canadian Tire at some point.  It's cyclical. 
Patience is a virtue.  Costco can also be a good source, but you generally have to jump on it when you see it.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #62 on: August 02, 2017, 10:23:55 »
Yeah, been there previous with projects. Could have been the small town I was in at the time, but there was a charge for it - likely because I am not talking huge numbers. For fifty bucks I can thread three sizes right at home, that ain't bad.

Material is kind of hard to sort, I don't imagine industrial suppliers have caught on to guys like me using this stuff decoratively ;D

The next time you are home, check out the local scrap yards...especially the sole owner types....they stock all kinds of material that you can bargin for.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #63 on: August 02, 2017, 11:53:06 »
The next time you are home, check out the local scrap yards...especially the sole owner types....they stock all kinds of material that you can bargin for.

That's on the hit list as well.

With a ratchet pipe threader I am going to end up pretty versatile!
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #64 on: August 06, 2017, 19:05:21 »
Canadian Tire and Home Depot sales have saved me a ton of money. I don't think I've ever paid full price for a power tool haha!

As well, I finally got the headboard finished. I installed/attached it to the bedframe that I had made a couple weeks earlier.
It turned out pretty good and the wife is happy....which is all that counts I guess haha.


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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #65 on: August 07, 2017, 06:37:38 »
Nice job, sidemount! :nod:
« Last Edit: August 07, 2017, 06:42:06 by Good2Golf »

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #66 on: August 07, 2017, 06:40:19 »
Beauty work.

The next big thing I am costing is a shed for the yard. Seems moving an older one isn't worth the aggravation - given I can't get answers from anyone!

I'll see what timber costs are and go from there.
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Offline sidemount

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #67 on: August 07, 2017, 09:09:01 »
Thanks!

I would agree that moving an old shed isn't really worth the hassle. With the cost of dimensional lumber, you can build a custom one that fits your needs and not break the bank....unless you want to go all out haha.
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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #68 on: August 07, 2017, 09:40:02 »
The next big thing I am costing is a shed for the yard. Seems moving an older one isn't worth the aggravation - given I can't get answers from anyone!

I'll see what timber costs are and go from there.

If you do, build it in 3 or 4 ft sections that bolt together.....that way "shed will travel"
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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #69 on: August 07, 2017, 09:48:35 »
If you do, build it in 3 or 4 ft sections that bolt together.....that way "shed will travel"

Been thinking about that...

I have to see my quotes first. I've kind of set an upper limit for a move, and we'll see what we reach with it. The original is pretty well build and nice exterior work, to boot. My wife just happens to know that labor to build a new one is free!
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Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #70 on: August 22, 2017, 20:40:17 »
Finished the convertible picnic table (posted above).  Turned out great, super useful and the angled backs make it really comfortable benches.  When I remember, I will post some pictures, but the plans are easy to follow with great results.  Only difference is I used 12' boards cut in half to make it 6' wide (vice 5' from the plan), so you can fit six people on it if needed, but loads of room for four with room for all the food for serving, so great for bbqs.

Next project is the end grain cutting board; have been making do with a plastic one but getting tired of sharpening my costco set all the time, so figured it's time.  Don't have a planer so will be busting out the belt sander and hand planer, and it's an excuse to replace the bar clamps that didn't make the move.  I figure I can make an unreasonably big one for about the same price as what I can by an A4 size one for, so should be fun

http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-make-a-SUPER-SWEET-cutting-board/

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #71 on: August 31, 2017, 14:30:42 »
Update on the router: DeWalt supplied me with the proper size/thread of the screws they use before I got home again, so that was sorted.

The shed will likely be built by the local high school. They have designs for everything and I only have to supply materials and a boom truck. Neighbor (a teacher) has offered his driveway for offloading. Sorted (I hope)

My Dremel really came into its own recently: I have been using it to strip bark from inner seams of large birch. My wife found some diamond bits online for about 15 bucks and so I have been drilling beack glass and shells for her. Oddly therapeutic.
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Offline Navy_Pete

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #72 on: September 01, 2017, 14:00:07 »
That sounds pretty sweet Scott, I wouldn't have thought off that for getting it built.

Does anyone have experience using some of these wood shaping/planers that fit on a grinder?  I don't have the shop space for any of that (or the money laying around for a quality planer) so thought these might be good to be able to pick up and play around with.

I'm sure there are other companies that make similar ones, but was looking at something like this;

https://www.arbortechtools.com/au/turbo-range/

Looks pretty sweet, so going to poke around for something made a bit closer than AUS if I can.

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #73 on: September 01, 2017, 14:22:34 »
If you're looking to thickness or flatten wood without a planer, make a sled for your router. You can get a flat bottom bit and make a frame, like in this video. Unless I completely misunderstand your question.
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Offline Scott

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Re: The Woodworking Thread
« Reply #74 on: September 01, 2017, 14:26:41 »
That sounds pretty sweet Scott, I wouldn't have thought off that for getting it built.

I'll update of course, it's not a for sure thing yet. Waiting on the neighbor to get back with info.

Quote
Does anyone have experience using some of these wood shaping/planers that fit on a grinder?  I don't have the shop space for any of that (or the money laying around for a quality planer) so thought these might be good to be able to pick up and play around with.

I'm sure there are other companies that make similar ones, but was looking at something like this;

https://www.arbortechtools.com/au/turbo-range/

Looks pretty sweet, so going to poke around for something made a bit closer than AUS if I can.

If you're looking to thickness or flatten wood without a planer, make a sled for your router. You can get a flat bottom bit and make a frame, like in this video. Unless I completely misunderstand your question.

Was thinking the same thing.

I've seen the grinder attachments used for pre finishing larger carvings, like the chainsaw type - and maybe that's what you're driving at for a use? If not, why not Mike's idea or a hand power plane? I watched a wicked tutorial a few years back about measuring, leveling, and stringing a larger piece to ensure a flat surface after many passes - can't find it now >:(
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