Author Topic: Dependent Child?  (Read 8148 times)

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Offline proudmom

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Dependent Child?
« on: July 06, 2015, 22:32:07 »
I'm not surf this is the right place to post this or not. My son is presently in St Jean for BMOQ and then will attending RMC-St Jean, he is 18 and this is his first year. What I am wondering is, is he still considered a "dependent child" or not? Thanks for any help or insight anyone may have on this.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2015, 22:39:10 by proudmom »

Offline Rider Pride

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2015, 22:45:03 »
It's not the right spot.

But to answer your question, any child attending post secondary education, whose primary residence is still with you is considered a dependant.
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Offline proudmom

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2015, 23:00:08 »
I really couldn't figure out where to post, but thank you very much for the reply. That is what I thought, but my husband thought that because he was in the military it would be different.
Thank you again.

Online Blackadder1916

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2015, 23:06:14 »
I'm not surf this is the right place to post this or not. My son is presently in St Jean for BMOQ and then will attending RMC-St Jean, he is 18 and this is his first year. What I am wondering is, is he still considered a "dependent child" or not? Thanks for any help or insight anyone may have on this.

For what purpose are you wondering if he can still be considered a "dependant child"?  Taxes?  Age of majority?  Immigration?  Coverage under a health insurance plan?  Additional driver on auto insurance?  Because he was naughty and you want to spank him?  The definition can vary widely depending on the reason.
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Offline Ostrozac

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2015, 23:39:40 »
Coverage under a health insurance plan? 

You do NOT want to be claiming a member of the Regular Force (even a newly enrolled Officer Cadet) for coverage under a provincial health insurance plan.


But to answer your question, any child attending post secondary education, whose primary residence is still with you is considered a dependant.

Does a member of the Reg Force who is posted to Saint-Jean still have a primary residence with their parents? That's a debateable point -- normally single students at CMR SJ would claim the barracks as their residence and file Quebec income taxes.

Offline George Wallace

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #5 on: July 07, 2015, 07:57:00 »
Ummmmm?

But to answer your question, any child attending post secondary education, whose primary residence is still with you is considered a dependant.

Does a member of the Reg Force who is posted to Saint-Jean still have a primary residence with their parents? That's a debateable point -- normally single students at CMR SJ would claim the barracks as their residence and file Quebec income taxes.

I highly doubt that a Reg Force person posted to Saint-Jean would be considered as attending "POST SECONDARY EDUCATION".  Rather they would be considered "FULL TIME EMPLOYED".

It is the norm to file Quebec Income Taxes if you are still posted to Saint-Jean on 31 December, even as a candidate.  That is the Law. 
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Online Blackadder1916

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #6 on: July 07, 2015, 13:25:25 »
You could "probably" claim your child as a dependent for tax year 2015, but only if this is their first year at RMC/CMR.  Come next year (ie; 2016), they will earn too much income which will negate the allowable deduction.

Check with CRA just to be sure.

As the child young subordinate officer (which may be an alternate definition of childish) is already 18 years old, he can't be claimed.

http://www.cra-arc.gc.ca/tx/ndvdls/tpcs/ncm-tx/rtrn/cmpltng/ddctns/lns360-390/367-eng.html
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Line 367 - Amount for children born in 1997* or later

You can claim $2,255 for each of your or your spouse's or common-law partner's children who are under 18 years of age at the end of the year.


*this is YOB for the 2014 tax year, it will change for each subsequent tax year
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Offline PMedMoe

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #7 on: July 07, 2015, 13:31:41 »
Maybe the OP's question isn't based on taxes but on child support?    ???

If the latter, I don't think anyone should be paying child support for a person who is getting their schooling paid for, plus a salary.  Just my  :2c:
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Offline proudmom

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2015, 20:44:24 »
My question was actually based on insurance. When I was looking into personal belonging insurance I was told that my plan covers dependent children up to $25,000; so I was trying to find out if he is still considered a dependent child or not.
« Last Edit: July 07, 2015, 20:47:49 by proudmom »

Online Blackadder1916

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #9 on: July 07, 2015, 21:19:13 »
My question was actually based on insurance. When I was looking into personal belonging insurance I was told that my plan covers dependent children up to $25,000; so I was trying to find out if he is still considered a dependent child or not.

I found this while googling to see what my insurance company has to say about the issue.  The highlighted parts say it all.  In all things insurance, if you are unsure, check with your agent.  That's what they are there for.

http://www.bcaa.com/learning-centre/home/protect-belongings/property-insurance-for-students
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September 15, 2014
Back to school: what you need to know about property insurance for students

Attending a college or university is a big step for any student. And it’s an even bigger step if doing so means staying or living away from home. Whether your child has made the transition to university or is taking part in an international exchange program, feeling comfortable is imperative to their success. This often means bringing along many of their personal items with them.

It’s important to ensure that their personal belongings are protected while away from home.  Losses for student’s personal belongings, which often include computer equipment, cell phones, cameras, and even smaller items like chargers and MP3 players, can cost a small fortune to replace if a loss occurs, especially if they must all be replaced at once.   

If your child has made their way to university, venturing away from home and packing their belonging with them, most home insurance policies cover their belongings up to a specified amount as long as they are still financially dependent on you. This means that regardless of their age, if they are enrolled in university, living away from home anywhere in the world, and if they depend on you for support and maintenance while away, coverage for their personal belongings may exist within your home insurance policy up to a specified amount. Make sure to check your policy to ensure that this coverage amount is sufficient to cover their belongings. If it isn’t enough, consider purchasing a separate tenants policy with more comprehensive coverage. 

Likewise, any student who supports themselves while attending a university or college, who no longer depends on you for support, will need to obtain their own tenant’s policy. This will ensure that their belongings are covered and provide them with the peace of mind they need while securing their future. 

The right home insurance can help protect your loved ones belongings and provide you with peace of mind, so ensure you double check your home insurance policy with your home insurance agent to ensure adequate coverage before they hit the books.
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Offline proudmom

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Re: Dependent Child?
« Reply #10 on: July 07, 2015, 22:47:48 »
Thanks Blackadder1916 your link makes a lot of sense! I did speak to my insurance broker and was told that a dependent child would be covered but they couldn't tell me if he was still considered a dependent. Thanks again. We will get him his own policy.