Author Topic: British Military Current Events  (Read 790352 times)

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2700 on: October 26, 2017, 10:09:23 »
Belfast man jailed in Germany for IRA Osnabrück mortar attack
 
James Anthony Oliver Corry sentenced to four years for part in bombing of British army barracks in 1996

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2017/oct/25/belfast-man-jailed-germany-ira-osnabruck-mortar-attack-british-army-barracks
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2701 on: October 26, 2017, 18:27:36 »
Hero SAS squad wipe out 15 ISIS jihadis SECONDS before they decapitate Christian family

SAS snipers took out 15 Isis fighters in a daring operation to stop a Christian family being decapitated.

http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/866711/SAS-ISIS-Mosul-Iraq-terror
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2702 on: October 28, 2017, 12:49:59 »
Hear, hear....


Keep Your Bl**dy Mouth Shut:

'All I'm asking for is a Bomber Command medal. They have absolutely no recognition apart from this miserable clasp,' he said.

The RAF veteran was born in Lincolnshire but now lives in Bristol in a care home. The other surviving Dambuster is Canadian Fred Sutherland, 94, who lives in Alberta.

Johnson also laments the fact that many of his ground crew fail to get the recognition they too deserve, suggesting they get 'a little left out'.


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5026421/Surviving-Dambuster-hits-revisionist-historians.html#ixzz4wp2nf396
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Eye In The Sky

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2703 on: October 28, 2017, 21:10:30 »
Not good news for the V-boat folks.  The backstory to this one is fairly significant too. 

Article Link

Nuclear submarine sex and drugs scandal: Nine Trident crew expelled from Navy amid 'cocaine' and affairs allegations


Nine crew members on HMS Vigilant tested positive for drugs after claims of inappropriate sexual relationships on board the submarine

Nine service personnel on a nuclear submarine have been discharged from the Royal Navy after testing positive for drugs.

The revelations come after claims earlier this month of inappropriate sexual relationships among some of those on board HMS Vigilant, one of four Vanguard Class submarines which maintain the UK's nuclear deterrent and is armed with Trident missiles.

It has now emerged that compulsory drugs tests on Vigilant crew members produced nine positive results, leading to nine individuals being discharged.

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "We do not tolerate drugs misuse by service personnel. Those found to have fallen short of our high standards face being discharged from service."

The Daily Mail reported that the drug detected by the tests was cocaine.

It has also been reported that a “furious” Defence Secretary Michael Fallon has now demanded mandatory drugs testing across the entire submarine fleet so he can be reassured that what happened on Vigilant was an isolated incident.

The submarine has recently been embroiled in controversy over allegations of an onboard relationship between a male and female.

Earlier this month, the Daily Mirror reported that the MoD was probing an "inappropriate relationship" between crew members, and that the captain of the vessel had been relieved of his duties pending the outcome.

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "We can confirm an investigation is under way, but it would be inappropriate to comment further at this stage. Any allegations of wrongdoing are taken very seriously and will be dealt with appropriately."

There are strict Royal Navy rules about relationships on board vessels.

Women were barred from serving on submarines until 2011, when a report found that there was no basis in fears that carbon dioxide in the recycled air could damage female fertility.

When the ban on female submariners was lifted, it was reported that some Navy wives feared that having women serving alongside men in the cramped conditions on board submarines would lead to sex scandals.

One naval source was quoted by The Sun as saying: “There is concern over what might happen. 

“If there was a sex scandal it would be impossible for anyone to be taken off until the sub returned from its four-month patrol.

“The Navy will go to great lengths to make sure that the first women are officers with impeccable credentials.”

In 2014, the first female commander of a frontline warship in the history of the Royal Navy left her vessel amid claims she had had an affair with a shipmate.

Commander Sarah West, who denied the relationship, was "removed from command" of the Type 23 frigate HMS Portland and re-appointed to another post.
The only time you have "too much gas" is when you're on fire.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2704 on: October 29, 2017, 01:55:33 »
Not good news for the V-boat folks.  The backstory to this one is fairly significant too. 

Article Link

Nuclear submarine sex and drugs scandal: Nine Trident crew expelled from Navy amid 'cocaine' and affairs allegations


Nine crew members on HMS Vigilant tested positive for drugs after claims of inappropriate sexual relationships on board the submarine

Nine service personnel on a nuclear submarine have been discharged from the Royal Navy after testing positive for drugs.

The revelations come after claims earlier this month of inappropriate sexual relationships among some of those on board HMS Vigilant, one of four Vanguard Class submarines which maintain the UK's nuclear deterrent and is armed with Trident missiles.

It has now emerged that compulsory drugs tests on Vigilant crew members produced nine positive results, leading to nine individuals being discharged.

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "We do not tolerate drugs misuse by service personnel. Those found to have fallen short of our high standards face being discharged from service."

The Daily Mail reported that the drug detected by the tests was cocaine.

It has also been reported that a “furious” Defence Secretary Michael Fallon has now demanded mandatory drugs testing across the entire submarine fleet so he can be reassured that what happened on Vigilant was an isolated incident.

The submarine has recently been embroiled in controversy over allegations of an onboard relationship between a male and female.

Earlier this month, the Daily Mirror reported that the MoD was probing an "inappropriate relationship" between crew members, and that the captain of the vessel had been relieved of his duties pending the outcome.

A Royal Navy spokesman said: "We can confirm an investigation is under way, but it would be inappropriate to comment further at this stage. Any allegations of wrongdoing are taken very seriously and will be dealt with appropriately."

There are strict Royal Navy rules about relationships on board vessels.

Women were barred from serving on submarines until 2011, when a report found that there was no basis in fears that carbon dioxide in the recycled air could damage female fertility.

When the ban on female submariners was lifted, it was reported that some Navy wives feared that having women serving alongside men in the cramped conditions on board submarines would lead to sex scandals.

One naval source was quoted by The Sun as saying: “There is concern over what might happen. 

“If there was a sex scandal it would be impossible for anyone to be taken off until the sub returned from its four-month patrol.

“The Navy will go to great lengths to make sure that the first women are officers with impeccable credentials.”

In 2014, the first female commander of a frontline warship in the history of the Royal Navy left her vessel amid claims she had had an affair with a shipmate.

Commander Sarah West, who denied the relationship, was "removed from command" of the Type 23 frigate HMS Portland and re-appointed to another post.

This situation demands that some wag come forward with an appropriate torpedo joke ;)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2705 on: October 29, 2017, 11:38:32 »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-man/one-paras-story-battle-goose-green-falklands-1982/

Maj. Christopher Keeble per Max Arthur

Quote
'It’s going to be bloody awful': How Paras were made battle-ready for the Falklands War

 The Paras by Max Arthur : From the Falklands to Afghanistan in their own words

29 OCTOBER 2017 • 1:19PM
Colonel H. Jones was the inspiration for making things happen in 2 Para. The way the unit was constructed, its morale, the training with an emphasis on speed and the offence, stemmed from him.

We were on leave prior to departure for the jungle in Belize, Central America, as the Falklands crisis blew up. Our sister battalion, 3 Para, had been selected to embark with 3 Commando Brigade, and it was felt that 2 Para should remain to fill the gap created by their departure. H was very impatient as we watched the Task Force depart, and more so when our overseas tour to Belize was cancelled. Despite these developments, we did not stop planning for the possibility of war.

It was clear the Falklands could only be recaptured by attack. We therefore made it our business, in the few days we had, to acquire what additional weapons and equipment we needed to increase our potential for offence. We also spent much time studying the topography, the Argentinian armed forces, and even working out how we could launch an airborne assault directly into the capital Stanley, such was our enthusiasm to go.
 
All this effort paid off when we heard we had been tasked to join 3 Commando Brigade at Ascension Island.

We were to be the best jungle-trained battalion in the South Atlantic. As soon as the battalion had been selected, H left to link up with the 3 Commando Brigade staff, leaving me in command. He said, ‘Chris, train up the battalion and bring it down to me. I’ll meet you at Ascension.’

We spent a week training in Aldershot, getting all the equipment, embarked the battalion on the troopship Norland and worked out a training programme for the remaining three weeks. So I spent four weeks commanding 2 Para in all.

There were several weaknesses in 2 Para, which I had seen on Salisbury Plain and at a major field exercise in Norfolk in January. These had to be put right.

The first was our ability to deal with casualties. The existing principle was based on patching up the injured and withdrawing them to expert help well behind the battle. We quickly appreciated that movement, other than by helicopter, would be too slow for casualty survival, so we decided to concentrate on battlefield resuscitation. In other words, to prevent the onset of shock and sustain the injured for as long as possible, at or near the site of wounding.

This was put into operation by our young medical officer, Captain Steve Hughes, RAMC, who had researched the medical experiences of various campaigns. He acquired 1,000 drips for intravenous infusion to cope with blood-loss and even bought a dummy forearm, veins and all, on which to practise.

The idea was that we would distribute these IVs to each man, along with the more usual morphine and shell dressings. A soldier would then have his own medical repair kit, which either he or a combat medic could administer at the site of wounding. During the journey south, we taught everyone how to set up a drip. As a result of these measures, we were able to reduce the loss of life dramatically.

The whole point of war is to apply violence to break the enemy’s will, not simply to destroy his weapons or his cities, but undermine his will to fight for what he believes in. How do you reinforce that will in a body of people who’ve never been to war? This is where our padre, David Cooper, was so marvellous. He took each section (nine men), the smallest fighting unit in the battalion, sat down in front of them and said, ‘Look, when we go on this battlefield, it’s going to be bloody awful. Now, I don’t know about you, but I’ll tell you how I’m going to feel.’

Cooper attempted to penetrate that macho façade soldiers build around themselves in order to reinforce their own inner resistance to fear. By voicing their own fears to them, he got them to talk about how they would actually cope with the trauma of war. Being a padre, and to some extent apart from the military structure, he gave them the opportunity to share their emotions with each other, developing a ‘spiritual’ bond within the sections, which is essential if people are going to work successfully together - and, for the 2 Para team, to die for each other.

It was a tremendous contribution. In that week after the Goose Green battle, there was closeness between everybody – they were fused by fire. There was this tremendous brotherhood. It’s a word used frequently by people who fought in the Second World War – the Brotherhood of Arnhem, for example – and it is a brotherhood, too. War is a very emotional business – more than people realise, and much more than I’d ever anticipated and appreciated.

I was enormously attracted to the Parachute Regiment because of this wonderful feeling of comradeship. We all have to go through a traumatic selection process, which weeds out a great number of people. We are united in our hardship; by what we have done. It is a very good way of preparing for the actual trauma of war. Soldiers do not fight for Queen and Country, they fight for each other. But they need to know that their comrades would do the same. Selection produces that mutual trust.

I remember parachuting onto the Arnhem drop zone with our sister battalion, 10 Para, on their annual pilgrimage to the battlefield and war cemetery. We visited the Oosterbeek crossroads, the scene of fierce fighting in 1944, and listened to one of the very few survivors of the battalion describing the battle around the junction.

Someone in the audience asked, ‘What made you go on fighting when the battalion had been largely destroyed, the cause lost and defeat inevitable?’ He paused, looked across to the suburban junction, and with tears brimming up in his eyes, he said quietly and simply, ‘They were my friends.’

That’s how it was for 2 Para. We had spent our peacetime training fusing the individuals into a team together. The fire of war merely tempered that process. We would never have given up. We would have fought to the last man rather than compromise the trust that existed between us.

The Paras by Max Arthur is published by Hodder & Stoughton on November 2 (£25). To order your copy for £19.99 plus p&p call 0844 871 1514 or visit books.telegraph.co.uk
"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

Offline FJAG

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2706 on: November 01, 2017, 22:15:38 »
Michael Fallon quits as defence secretary, saying his behaviour has 'fallen short'

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/nov/01/michael-fallon-quits-as-defence-secretary

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Offline FJAG

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2707 on: November 02, 2017, 20:37:37 »
Orchestrating something, minister? New Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson conducts military band hours after being accused of ‘knifing’ predecessor Michael Fallon to get his job

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5044795/New-Defence-Secretary-Gavin-Williamson-conducts-army-band.html

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2708 on: November 02, 2017, 21:15:22 »
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/men/thinking-man/one-paras-story-battle-goose-green-falklands-1982/

Maj. Christopher Keeble per Max Arthur

I know many of those guys. Most of them got out within a year of returning from the war.

Amusingly, I was once observed 'brawling' in the mess, with a couple of Royal Marine Officers by Max Arthur, who was invited to speak at the Mess dinner.

As I emerged, somewhat scathed, from the melee he remarked "Two Marines to One PARA: that's fair odds." :)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2709 on: November 05, 2017, 11:27:44 »
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2710 on: November 05, 2017, 11:35:57 »
From the K-class to the party boat, submarines have a history of disaster

In his resignation letter this week, the defence secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, implied that he had gone because he had “fallen below the high standards that we require of the armed forces that I have the honour to represent”. But who, with knowledge of the recent goings-on on HMS Vigilant, could have read that without thinking to the contrary: that it made Fallon exactly the right man for the job?

The submarine, described in the Daily Mail as the navy’s “party boat”, has supplied a compelling stream of stories since it docked in September at the US naval base at Kings Bay, Georgia, where the four submarines of the Vanguard class go to exchange their stocks of Trident missiles. (They are maintained in the US.) In breach of the navy’s so-called “no-touching” rules within the same chain of command, two couples on the boat were allegedly having affairs.
The captain, Commander Stuart Armstrong, was the first to be suspended from duty pending investigation, followed a few days later by his second-in-command, Lieutenant Commander Michael Seal. Their alleged partners, two more junior female officers, were also taken from the boat.

The crew, meanwhile, had begun to party at their hotel. After stories of cocaine and prostitutes emerged, the Vigilant’s remaining senior officers ordered that the crew be tested for drugs before they were allowed back on board. Nine failed the test and were flown home and sacked. Another two sailors quit. A third is facing a court martial for being absent without leave. Of the Vigilant’s 168-strong crew, of whom seven are women, about 10% are in one way or another hors de combat as the result of investigations, firings and resignations. Fallon, reportedly “furious” in what proved to be his last week as a minister, is said to have demanded mandatory drugs tests across the entire submarine fleet.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/04/k-class-submarines-disaster-navy-britain-hms-vigilant
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Chris Pook

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2711 on: November 05, 2017, 12:14:29 »
From the K-class to the party boat, submarines have a history of disaster

In his resignation letter this week, the defence secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, implied that he had gone because he had “fallen below the high standards that we require of the armed forces that I have the honour to represent”. But who, with knowledge of the recent goings-on on HMS Vigilant, could have read that without thinking to the contrary: that it made Fallon exactly the right man for the job?

The submarine, described in the Daily Mail as the navy’s “party boat”, has supplied a compelling stream of stories since it docked in September at the US naval base at Kings Bay, Georgia, where the four submarines of the Vanguard class go to exchange their stocks of Trident missiles. (They are maintained in the US.) In breach of the navy’s so-called “no-touching” rules within the same chain of command, two couples on the boat were allegedly having affairs.
The captain, Commander Stuart Armstrong, was the first to be suspended from duty pending investigation, followed a few days later by his second-in-command, Lieutenant Commander Michael Seal. Their alleged partners, two more junior female officers, were also taken from the boat.

The crew, meanwhile, had begun to party at their hotel. After stories of cocaine and prostitutes emerged, the Vigilant’s remaining senior officers ordered that the crew be tested for drugs before they were allowed back on board. Nine failed the test and were flown home and sacked. Another two sailors quit. A third is facing a court martial for being absent without leave. Of the Vigilant’s 168-strong crew, of whom seven are women, about 10% are in one way or another hors de combat as the result of investigations, firings and resignations. Fallon, reportedly “furious” in what proved to be his last week as a minister, is said to have demanded mandatory drugs tests across the entire submarine fleet.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/nov/04/k-class-submarines-disaster-navy-britain-hms-vigilant

Is this what happens when you let sailors leave port without Marines as escorts? 
"Wyrd bið ful aræd"

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2712 on: November 05, 2017, 12:23:44 »
Is this what happens when you let sailors leave port without Marines as escorts?

It sounds like some of the crew may have been acting like 'escorts', which could be part of the issue ;)
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2713 on: November 11, 2017, 12:30:43 »
Britain's last surviving Dambuster, 95, gets an MBE from the Queen

https://uk.news.yahoo.com/britains-last-surviving-dambuster-95-gets-mbe-queen-101944677.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline jollyjacktar

    Looking forward to Christmas leave.

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2714 on: November 11, 2017, 18:37:01 »
Well deserved.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2715 on: November 12, 2017, 21:44:31 »
Viable pipe bomb found at Omagh Remembrance Day cenotaph security alert - violent dissident republicans blamed

The Remembrance Day wreath laying ceremony was postponed

https://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/northern-ireland/viable-pipe-bomb-found-at-omagh-remembrance-day-cenotaph-security-alert-violent-dissident-republicans-blamed-36311666.html
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline FJAG

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2716 on: November 25, 2017, 12:39:34 »
Military bands set to get their marching orders as MoD desperately looks for savings that won't affect frontline


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5116991/Military-bands-set-face-cuts-MoD-looks-savings.html

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Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2717 on: November 25, 2017, 13:16:54 »
Military bands set to get their marching orders as MoD desperately looks for savings that won't affect frontline


http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5116991/Military-bands-set-face-cuts-MoD-looks-savings.html

 :cheers:

The elephant in the British front room is their independent nuclear deterrent, of course.
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline tomahawk6

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2718 on: November 26, 2017, 18:34:51 »
Royal Navy mounting guard at a number of Royal palaces beginning today to celebrate Year of the Navy.


Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2719 on: December 02, 2017, 10:27:11 »
Meanwhile, at 43 Cdo:

Two Royal Marine corporals played a Deal or No Deal-style game handing out degrading and painful punishments to junior comrades, a court martial has heard.

Cpl Philip Beer and Cpl Danny Foster oversaw a nightly gathering of their 43 Commando troop called “family time”, during which they punished “professional failings”.

Punishments included being hung upside down and whipped, being shaved naked and being forced to commit sex acts to gay pornography.
 
Portsmouth Military Court, heard the method of deciding punishment was based on the Noel Edmonds' television game show, with members of the troop forced to pick box numbers, with each containing a punishment.

One of the troop would then play 'The Banker', offering alternative forfeits to the marines which they could swap for the ones they had chosen.

The punishments included one named 'Django,' after Quentin Tarantino's Oscar-winning film about slavery 'Django Unchained', and required victims to be hung upside down and whipped.

Another, named 'new born baby', which involved making a marine shave all the hair from their body, was also handed out.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/11/27/royal-marines-trial-degrading-juniors-deal-no-deal-punishments/
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2720 on: December 04, 2017, 10:04:20 »
Awfully decent of them:

France offers to LEND Britain its amphibious landing craft amid outcry over government defence cuts
UK is considering axing HMS Albion and HMS Bulwark as part of defence cuts
France has offered to run joint deployments from its ships if the UK cuts theirs
Tory Andrew Bowie said begging from France would be national embarrassment


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5143183/France-offers-LEND-UK-amphibious-landing-craft.html#ixzz50IxnYWq6
"The most important qualification of a soldier is fortitude under fatigue and privation. Courage is only second; hardship, poverty and want are the best school for a soldier." Napoleon

Offline Humphrey Bogart

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2721 on: December 04, 2017, 10:15:38 »
Awfully decent of them:

France offers to LEND Britain its amphibious landing craft amid outcry over government defence cuts
UK is considering axing HMS Albion and HMS Bulwark as part of defence cuts
France has offered to run joint deployments from its ships if the UK cuts theirs
Tory Andrew Bowie said begging from France would be national embarrassment


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5143183/France-offers-LEND-UK-amphibious-landing-craft.html#ixzz50IxnYWq6


From the article:

Quote
'To see the Royal Navy, once the most powerful and feared navy in the word, begging and borrowing from our neighbours across the Channel would be a national embarrassment and would demean us in the eyes of our allies and partners.
'I hope the Government can put this to bed once and for all and guarantee the future of our amphibious capability, independent of other nations.'

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5143183/France-offers-LEND-UK-amphibious-landing-craft.html#ixzz50J0LSTVB
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I'm sure the Italians feel the same way every time someone talks about the Roman Empire  ;D

This explains why the Royal Marines are rapidly re-rolling their Commandos in to specialized Maritime Interdiction teams, etc.

Offline daftandbarmy

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2722 on: December 05, 2017, 23:54:11 »
Nearly 18,000 Army personnel are not FIT to be deployed to war zones fuelling fears about cuts to forces
The Army is meant to be 82,000-strong but has already fallen to just 78,407
And just 60,546 members of the Army are fully fit to be sent to the frontline
Tory MP Andrew Bowie said it is 'appalling' troop numbers have got so low


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5146931/Nearly-18-000-Army-personnel-not-FIT-got-o-war-zones.html#ixzz50S94xXw8
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Offline FJAG

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2723 on: December 06, 2017, 01:04:30 »
Nearly 18,000 Army personnel are not FIT to be deployed to war zones fuelling fears about cuts to forces
The Army is meant to be 82,000-strong but has already fallen to just 78,407
And just 60,546 members of the Army are fully fit to be sent to the frontline
Tory MP Andrew Bowie said it is 'appalling' troop numbers have got so low


Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5146931/Nearly-18-000-Army-personnel-not-FIT-got-o-war-zones.html#ixzz50S94xXw8
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Made me think back. In 1963, on the eve of unification and integration Canada had a regular army of 49,760 and a Militia of 53,872 (the Navy 21,476 reg and 3,583 reserves with 1 aircraft carrier and 28 destroyer escorts, 17 frigates and 10 minesweepers; the RCAF 52,458 regular and 2,223 auxiliary in 19 regular (including 2 Bomarc nuclear missile sqns) and 11 auxiliary squadrons.) (source: The Statesman's Yearbook 1964-65)

Sigh.

The Brit army in contrast ramped up from 165,000 in 1963 (at the time the last national service soldiers were leaving service) to 189,000 in 1968 (all regular) Source: The British Army, Manpower, and Society Into the Twenty-first Century

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Offline Chris Pook

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Re: British Military Current Events
« Reply #2724 on: December 07, 2017, 16:50:54 »
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