Author Topic: Politics in 2017  (Read 95522 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 100,200
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,945
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #900 on: November 01, 2017, 18:47:57 »
Actually, he's dressed as an illegal alien who came into the country as an infant.

I sure hope his parents didn't lie on his application for citizenship!

Offline George Wallace

  • Army.ca Fossil
  • *****
  • 430,280
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 31,442
  • Crewman
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #901 on: November 05, 2017, 17:13:44 »
DISCLAIMER: The opinions and arguments of George Wallace posted on this Site are solely those of George Wallace and not the opinion of Army.ca and are posted for information purposes only.
Unless so stated, they are reflective of my opinion -- and my opinion only, a right that I enjoy along with every other Canadian citizen.

Offline SeaKingTacco

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 110,445
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 4,509
  • Door Gunnery- The Sport of Kings!
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #902 on: November 05, 2017, 17:54:16 »
You know, I am not against tax planning.

It is hypocrisy of it all that I cannot stand.

Offline gryphonv

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 8,055
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 304
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #903 on: November 06, 2017, 15:04:23 »

Offline jollyjacktar

    Looking forward to Christmas leave.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 136,242
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,666
  • My uncle F/Sgt W.H.S. Buckwell KIA 14/05/43 22YOA
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #904 on: November 06, 2017, 16:03:18 »
Denis Coderre goes down in flames.  Love it.  Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.  LOL

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/montreal/montreal-mayor-valerie-plante-day-1-1.4388908
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline gryphonv

  • Full Member
  • *****
  • 8,055
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 304
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #905 on: November 06, 2017, 16:21:07 »
Denis Coderre goes down in flames.  Love it.  Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.  LOL

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/montreal/montreal-mayor-valerie-plante-day-1-1.4388908

I haven't been following the news from Montreal, but this looks like a great step forward, espically for a city trying to escape from the corruption/mafia image.

Offline Good2Golf

  • Directing Staff
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 169,120
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 9,915
  • Dammit! I lost my sand-wedge on that last jump!
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #906 on: November 06, 2017, 16:51:46 »
“¡Hasta la vista, ba-by!”

Offline Hamish Seggie

  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *****
  • 210,247
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 9,617
  • This is my son Michael, KIA Afghanistan 3 Sep 08
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #907 on: November 06, 2017, 19:33:02 »
Denis Coderre goes down in flames.  Love it.  Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.  LOL

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/montreal/montreal-mayor-valerie-plante-day-1-1.4388908

Dumb as dirt is gone? Good!
Freedom Isn't Free   "Never Shall I Fail My Brothers"

“Do everything that is necessary and nothing that is not".

Offline dapaterson

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Legend
  • *
  • 376,230
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 14,956
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #908 on: November 06, 2017, 19:42:35 »
Denis Coderre goes down in flames.  Love it.  Couldn't happen to a nicer guy.  LOL

http://www.cbc.ca/beta/news/canada/montreal/montreal-mayor-valerie-plante-day-1-1.4388908

Waiting for his appointment as a Senator in 3... 2... 1...

This posting made in accordance with the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 2(b):
Everyone has the following fundamental freedoms: freedom of thought, belief, opinion and expression, including freedom of the press and other media of communication
http://laws.justice.gc.ca/en/charter/1.html

Offline FJAG

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 103,555
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,083
  • Ex Gladio Justicia
    • WordPress Page
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #909 on: November 06, 2017, 23:30:44 »
You know, I am not against tax planning.

It is hypocrisy of it all that I cannot stand.

Tax planning is legal. Tax avoidance is not.

 :cheers:
Illegitimi non carborundum
Semper debeatis percutis ictu primo
Access my "Allies" book series at:
https://wolfriedel.wordpress.com

Offline ModlrMike

    : Riding time again... woohooo!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 200,004
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,479
    • Canadian Association of Physician Assistants
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #910 on: November 07, 2017, 00:03:46 »
Tax planning is legal. Tax avoidance is not.

 :cheers:

Tax avoidance, defined as paying the least amount of tax possible, is legal. Tax evasion is not.
« Last Edit: November 07, 2017, 00:07:09 by ModlrMike »
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
Zero tolerance is the politics of the lazy. All it requires is that you do nothing and ban everything.

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 100,200
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,945
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #911 on: November 07, 2017, 08:54:55 »
Yes.  Tax planning is just the term used for tax avoidance in polite society.  :nod:

Offline FJAG

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 103,555
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,083
  • Ex Gladio Justicia
    • WordPress Page
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #912 on: November 07, 2017, 15:13:48 »
Tax avoidance, defined as paying the least amount of tax possible, is legal. Tax evasion is not.

 :facepalm:  Sometimes I think that I should just stay in bed longer. Yes. I meant to say tax "evasion" is illegal. Tax avoidance is just fine and is the legitimate aim of tax planning. Sigh.

Where's the "mea culpa" smiley when you really need it.

 :cheers:
Illegitimi non carborundum
Semper debeatis percutis ictu primo
Access my "Allies" book series at:
https://wolfriedel.wordpress.com

Offline Jarnhamar

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 227,526
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 9,110
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #913 on: November 08, 2017, 17:54:57 »
I just read the government is spending half a billion dollars on Canada 150 celebrations this year

As a tax paper I gotta say how proud I am of that.

Is it too much to hope that some of the merchandise includes pink vagina 150 toques?
There are no wolves on Fenris

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 100,200
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,945
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #914 on: November 08, 2017, 18:18:36 »
Well, at least they didn't spend one full billion dollars on celebrating their 375th anniversary, like a City that shall remain nameless ... but who just had a change of Mayor.  Just saying!

Offline Rifleman62

    Retired.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 73,115
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 2,480
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #915 on: November 14, 2017, 10:37:32 »
See after the CBC article for the link "mandate tracker"


http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/liberals-mandate-promises-deliverology-analysis-wherry-1.4400036

Trudeau's Liberals check their to-do list: 67 promises down, more than 200 still to go - Aaron Wherry - CBC News - Nov 14, 2017
Newly launched government web site keeps track of promises kept, broken and 'modified'

Justin Trudeau's Liberals, elevated to power on promises to do all sorts of things and awash in enthusiasm for data and evidence, are proposing now to account for what they've been doing with their time in office: to quantify both their own ability to keep a promise and track whether keeping those promises is contributing to measurable improvements in the welfare of the country.

Now it is down to how well they keep score on themselves.

First, this morning, the Liberals are launching a mandate tracker: an online accounting of the government's progress, or lack thereof, on each and every commitment specified in the mandate letters issued by the prime minister to each cabinet minister.

By the government's own count — CBC News was given an early look at the website — there were a total of 364 commitments specified in those letters.

At the midway point of its term, the government believes it has fulfilled 66 of those promises. (Another commitment to resettle 25,000 Syrian refugees is considered "completed" but "modified" because that mark was not reached until February 2016, instead of the promised deadline of Dec. 31, 2015.)

Three commitments are listed as "not being pursued." These include, most infamously, the promise of electoral reform, but also promises to remove the GST from new capital investments in affordable rental housing and provide a 12-month break on employment insurance premiums for companies that hire young workers,.

The majority of commitments are listed as "underway." Of those, 218 are listed as "on track," while 13 are described as "underway with challenges." The promise to balance the federal budget by 2019 is considered an example of the latter — the challenge apparently being that it's almost definitely not going to happen.

The website will be updated regularly over the next two years.

Measuring the mandate

The Trudeau government's own tally can be compared with a count maintained by researchers at Laval University. Based on 353 promises identified in the last Liberal election platform, those researchers gives the Liberals credit for keeping 110 commitments so far and breaking 12.

But beneath those numbers, there will be room for debate. The site provides some explanation for each commitment, and how well the government has accounted for itself should be closely parsed.

When Jean Chretien's Liberals issued a 36-month progress report in 1996, they claimed to have fulfilled 78 per cent of their promises. But they also credited themselves with beginning to both replace the GST and wind down what was then known as the department of Indian Affairs — both the department and the tax, you might notice, are still with us.

Any government should be happy to list off its good deeds. And, depending on how many more items the government is able to complete between now and 2019, much might depend on how much progress the Liberals are able to demonstrate on those commitments not quite fulfilled.

But the mandate tracker is also just the first part of an effort to quantify the government's efforts.

'Deliverology' goes public

In a few weeks, a second report will attempt to link the government's priorities and actions with metrics that track real-world progress and change.

Since coming to office in the fall of 2015, the Liberals have dwelled on a school of thought known as "deliverology" — an approach, developed by an advisor to Tony Blair's Labour government in the United Kingdom, that aims to prioritize the delivery of policy and the measuring of results.

"A lot of energy is placed on announcements — oh, we're investing $20 million in this project. And the follow-up a year later or two years later — to say, well, X number of people have had their lives affected positively by that investment — isn't always part of the operations or philosophies of government," Justin Trudeau said in May 2016, in response to a question about the government's management philosophy.

In theory, that would be a useful approach.

A "results and delivery" unit has been established in the Privy Council Office and each government department now has a chief results and delivery officer, as well as a chief data officer.

With that second report, "deliverology" will go public. Data might be presented on things like child poverty, housing, retirement security, access to broadband internet or boil-water advisories on Indigenous communities.

"The goal is to put as much information out there and data out there as possible, with clarity around goals," said a senior government official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

Doing the math on more data

At best, this might lead to a better discussion about what government does, what issues it is trying to address and what policies make a difference.

At worst, new reporting could merely give the government new ways to claim success.

Much will depend on what metrics the government chooses to focus on, whether it can reasonably connect government activity with changes in social outcomes, and whether the government is willing to admit failure.

If it were easy or risk-free for the federal government to rigorously report on the actual impacts of its actions, someone probably would have done it by now.

At the very least, the Liberals seem to have realized there are significant gaps in what the government knows — the last federal budget committed more than $400 million to a half dozen data initiatives. Even still, it could take years to determine whether a policy made an impact.

In an interview, Kevin Page and Sahir Khan, formerly of the parliamentary budget office and now leading the Institute of Fiscal Studies at the University of Ottawa, say measuring performance will matter most if it is built into every step of the system: as part of determining how resources are allocated, how public servants are judged and how MPs vote on government spending.

And Page says it should be applied to all spending, not just the shiniest objects.

If you are a conservative who believes in limited government, there is less reason to worry about demonstrating that the government can actively deliver meaningful improvements to society.

But a government that pledges to spend more and involve itself in more areas has some incentive to show that all that money and activity has amounted to substantive change.

Ultimately, that is what the Liberals are contending with: not only a need to show that they can be trusted to do what they said they would do, but that their vision of government is supported by the evidence.



https://www.canada.ca/en/privy-council/campaigns/mandate-tracker-results-canadians.html?utm_campaign=not-applicable&utm_medium=vanity-url&utm_source=canada-ca_results
   
Mandate Letter Tracker: Delivering results for Canadians   (If you get an Ajax error @ link above, Google this)

Search "Veterans" under the green boxes and this is the result: https://www.canada.ca/en/privy-council/campaigns/mandate-tracker-results-canadians.html?utm_campaign=not-applicable&utm_medium=vanity-url&utm_source=canada-ca_results

One interesting item is:

Quote
Help injured Veterans by re-establishing lifelong pensions and insuring that they all have access to financial advice and support. Status: Underway - on track

Result Anticipated: Injured veterans have the option of taking a life-long pension, and are provided financial advice and support to assist them in determining the form of compensation that works best for them and their families.

IMHO, above, is NOT the Liberal election promise.
   
   
   
   
Never Congratulate Yourself In Victory, Nor Blame Your Horses In Defeat - Old Cossack Expression

Offline Jarnhamar

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 227,526
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 9,110
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #916 on: November 18, 2017, 21:20:38 »
 Travel to Syria, join ISIS, murder and rape people then come back to Canada and don't face any disciplinary action or jail.

Quote
So, while other countries are working to make sure that ISIS fighters aren’t even alive to return, Trudeau is not only apparently taking zero steps to eliminate them, but is offering “support” when they return.



I wonder if that support includes money.


https://www.spencerfernando.com/2017/11/17/insanity-trudeau-government-giving-reintegration-support-former-isis-fighters-instead-arresting-eliminating/


« Last Edit: November 18, 2017, 21:29:08 by Jarnhamar »
There are no wolves on Fenris

Offline jollyjacktar

    Looking forward to Christmas leave.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 136,242
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,666
  • My uncle F/Sgt W.H.S. Buckwell KIA 14/05/43 22YOA
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #917 on: November 18, 2017, 21:57:33 »
Yup, we're led by pussies.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline ModlrMike

    : Riding time again... woohooo!

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *
  • 200,004
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 3,479
    • Canadian Association of Physician Assistants
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #918 on: November 18, 2017, 22:40:04 »
We don't need, nor dare I say want these people back in Canada. They made their choice to ally with an organization bent on destroying our way of life. Now they get to live with the result of that choice. F*%$ 'em I say!
WARNING: The consumption of alcohol may create the illusion that you are tougher,smarter, faster and better looking than most people.
Every normal man must be tempted, at times, to spit upon his hands, hoist the black flag, and begin slitting throats. (H.L. Mencken 1919)
Zero tolerance is the politics of the lazy. All it requires is that you do nothing and ban everything.

Offline Jarnhamar

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 227,526
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 9,110
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #919 on: November 19, 2017, 08:47:01 »
I'm sure these sickos who took part in real life Saw-movie style tortures will be upstanding members of our society again.


Quote
Sajjan told reporters that Canada will deal with threats posed by the Islamic State, whether they come from afar or closer to home.

He said the military and other security agencies are taking measures to ensure that Canadians who fight with the Islamic State pose no threat if they return to Canada, while abiding by international law.

He said returnees are being monitored to ensure they are not a threat.

"We will make sure that we put every type of resource into place so that Canadians are well protected," Sajjan said as the three-day conference began Friday. "Our main priority is making sure that they don't become a threat to Canada."


http://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/politics/sajjan-trumpets-canada-s-increased-role-on-the-geopolitical-stage-1.3682666
« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 10:22:59 by Jarnhamar »
There are no wolves on Fenris

Offline jollyjacktar

    Looking forward to Christmas leave.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 136,242
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,666
  • My uncle F/Sgt W.H.S. Buckwell KIA 14/05/43 22YOA
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #920 on: November 19, 2017, 09:39:10 »
I'm sure these sickos who took part in real like Saw-movie style tortures will be upstanding members of our society again.

 

http://www.ctvnews.ca/mobile/politics/sajjan-trumpets-canada-s-increased-role-on-the-geopolitical-stage-1.3682666

Wouldn't you with an extra $10.5M!  That seems to be the going Liberal rate.
I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline Jarnhamar

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 227,526
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 9,110
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #921 on: November 23, 2017, 20:17:22 »
Ralph Goodale highlights how we're going to deal with ISIS returnees.

Quote
"What we're doing with the analysis that we've conducted is, in fact, build a series of  podcasts and counter-narratives through art-based pedagogy and poetry ..."

Some Shakespeare outta work lol
There are no wolves on Fenris

Offline jollyjacktar

    Looking forward to Christmas leave.

  • Army.ca Subscriber
  • Army.ca Fixture
  • *
  • 136,242
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 5,666
  • My uncle F/Sgt W.H.S. Buckwell KIA 14/05/43 22YOA
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #922 on: November 23, 2017, 20:31:14 »
What a bunch of ******* knobs.   :facepalm:

I'm just like the CAF, I seem to have retention issues.

Offline MCG

  • Army.ca Legend
  • *****
  • 192,475
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 11,531
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #923 on: November 23, 2017, 21:39:53 »
Well, at least we know he is not closely monitoring the internet where, painfully on display, is the remarkable ability of people to not see facts, arguments, narratives, & messaging that are inconsistent with preconceived opinions ... else he might have picked a different recourse.

Offline Larry Strong

  • Army.ca Veteran
  • *****
  • 223,186
  • Rate Post
  • Posts: 1,592
  • 546 days from 0 to being King of the Castle
Re: Politics in 2017
« Reply #924 on: November 23, 2017, 22:28:11 »
Except their count is 2 years old.....they have no clue to how many are back I would wager..........

http://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/furey-liberals-count-of-60-canadian-jihadists-is-a-two-year-old-number

Quote
FUREY: Liberals' count of 60 Canadian jihadists is a two-year-old number

The terrorist situation in Iraq and Syria is a continually evolving phenomenon. So why is the Liberal government using two-year-old data about terrorists and trying to pass it off as current?

This has been an issue for several years now — the return of Canadian ISIS fighters to home soil. And during that time it’s taken a lot of guesswork to piece together just how many jihadists we’re talking about.

It’s a tough slog, putting it all together. Not just for journalists and parliamentarians, but for the CSIS and RCMP officers assigned the task.

How many ISIS fighters are walking about freely in our country? Dozens. Potentially, well over a hundred. We don’t know the exact number, but we’ve got the evidence to wager it’s more than the Liberals are letting on.

On Monday, Conservative MP Michelle Rempel accused PM Justin Trudeau of hiding the number of fighters who have returned, asking for an exact count. Public Safety Minister Ralph Goodale stood up to offer the response: “in the order of 60.”


That was the number that hit the headlines and got Canadians talking. But it’s far from accurate. The first clue comes from reading Goodale’s full remark: “As the director of CSIS indicated before a parliamentary committee some months ago, the number of returns known to the Government of Canada is in the order of 60, and they are under very careful investigation.”

Some months ago? Try more than a year and a half ago. Goodale appears to be referring to CSIS director Michel Coulombe’s March, 2016, testimony before the standing Senate committee on national security and defence. It was there that Coulombe offered the 60 count.

However, when Postmedia asked Goodale’s office where it got that number from, it cited a government report compiled as of year-end 2015. This tells us two things: 1) That Coulombe offered Senators a figure that was four months stale; 2) That Goodale answered Rempel’s question with a figure that’s a full two years old.

In response to a question on this seeming discrepancy, Goodale’s spokesperson Scott Bardsley told Postmedia on Wednesday that “the figures haven’t changed.” Likewise, multiple media requests made to CSIS by Postmedia over the past two years requesting updates on the figure have either referred to these same figures or have simply gone unanswered.

It’s unclear what it means to say the figures haven’t changed. Is it that CSIS and the government just haven’t tabulated new numbers for public release? Or does it mean that the number has been static at 60 for two years?

The latter is hard to believe. Back in October 2014, CSIS deputy director of operations Jeff Yaworski testified before the same Senate committee that the number at that time was 80. How did it drop by 20 in two years?

That question was actually put to Coulombe in his 2016 appearance. He explained that in some cases people have come back to Canada and then returned again for round two of fighting, dropping off the list of those with firm footing on home soil.

In other cases, some people who were on the list were later found to be travelling abroad but not for terror purposes so shouldn’t have been on it in the first place. Fair enough. But if that’s the case, this suggests that the numbers publicly presented just this week have remained more or less static not just since spring 2016 but since the fall of 2014. It’s hard to take this seriously, at least without further explanation.

This is largely because over the past couple of years, we’ve been told several times that there are close to 200 extremists abroad who have yet to return home, with around 100 of them based in Iraq and Syria. Are we to believe that none of these 100+ individuals have returned since December 2015, even since the recent fall of the caliphate? What happened to them? Where did they go? We know of a few who were killed, but all of them?

Putting these numbers together is an art not an exact science. And even though Goodale was responding to a question about ISIS fighters, the number he gave actually covers all extremist groups operating in the broader region. From that perspective, we should cut our security services a degree of slack. But we should still expect them to be forthright as much as possible.

Instead, they’re being misleading. The question is whether they’re also misleading Goodale and Trudeau or if our politicians do have a more accurate picture of the count and that they are in turn misleading the public.


Cheers
Larry
Proud sponsor of the Maple Leaf Legacy Project. http://www.mapleleaflegacy.ca