Author Topic: CF Domestic Disaster Relief Ops (merged)  (Read 38425 times)

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Offline dapaterson

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Re: CF Helping in Hurricaine Igor Zone
« Reply #25 on: October 12, 2010, 10:10:06 »
Random, but relevant, question here. Do they (units from Gagetown) have measures in place to make sure no Newfoundland soil finds its back to New Brunswick?

They will follow all federal regulations and any provicinal regulations.

That said, to my knowledge there is no quarantine of Newfoundland - I'm curious about the background to your question?
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Re: CF Helping in Hurricaine Igor Zone
« Reply #26 on: October 12, 2010, 10:10:32 »
I think any vehicle getting on the ferry is subjected to a washing. 

They will follow all federal regulations and any provicinal regulations.

That said, to my knowledge there is no quarantine of Newfoundland - I'm curious about the background to your question?

Quote
people don’t realize it, but when it comes time to leave the island via the ferry, your vehicle will be treated to a washing and vacuuming at the terminal. No, it’s not a quaint custom; it’s to keep the Newfoundland soil in Newfoundland in order to prevent the spread of potato canker, a soil borne disease. To speed the process, wash your tent pegs beforehand, as they’ll be inspected too. Also, don’t attempt to take any vegetable matter out of the province, even if those unique blue potatoes are the best thing you’ve ever tasted.

Source:  http://www.suite101.com/content/travelling-to-newfoundland-a27418
« Last Edit: October 12, 2010, 10:14:16 by PMedMoe »
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Re: CF Helping in Hurricaine Igor Zone
« Reply #27 on: October 12, 2010, 10:26:39 »
That said, to my knowledge there is no quarantine of Newfoundland - I'm curious about the background to your question?

Potato Wart Disease. As near as I know, the quarantine is still in place. It surfaced in a few fields in PEI back in 2000 and caused a pretty big headache for the farmers. If I'm not mistaken, the USA closed their border to PEI potatoes for a while, which can really cripple regions where farming is the driving force of the economy. Oddly enough, I got to thinking about it while picking rocks on a potato harvester here in NB, and figured I'd ask.
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Re: CF Helping in Hurricaine Igor Zone
« Reply #28 on: October 12, 2010, 13:23:33 »
According to Marine Atlantic's description of both the Port Aux Basques and Argentia terminals it outlines briefly the inspection and washing procedures for vehicles leaving Newfoundland.  http://www.marine-atlantic.ca/en/travelers/terminals.shtml

I also recall that the cost associated with this was downloaded to the customer quite a while ago.  http://www.releases.gov.nl.ca/releases/1997/forest/0926n01.htm

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CF Domestic Disaster Relief Superthread
« Reply #29 on: December 14, 2010, 09:55:45 »
Herc & 2 x Griffons for now, according to this from the Toronto Sun:
Quote
The Ontario Provincial Police have called in the military to help pull more than 300 people stranded on Hwy. 402 between London and Sarnia by a severe winter storm.

The military helicopters, brought in from CFB Trenton after Lambton County declared a state of emergency, are standing by for now because visibility is so poor on the highway, they'd have nowhere to land.

"They'll be airlifting people from their vehicles but for now they're standing down because they need to have a safe area to touch down and reach those in need," said OPP Const. John Reurink.

All east-west Lambton County roads are "like a parking lot," Reurink said.

"Any motorist that is going on those roads is making a grave mistake."

More than 360 vehicles are stranded on the highway, many between Sarnia and Warwick, but the entire highway has been shut down because of zero visibility and blowing snow.

About 300 people will need to be rescued from their vehicles, Reurink said.

A C130 Hercules and two Griffin helicopters specially designed for search and rescue missions should be touching down around 8:30 a.m. to rescue people stranded in their vehicles on Hwy. 402.

The C310 has spotters on board who look through portholes and can guide the smaller Griffins to a safe landing spot.

The Griffins are equipped with slings that can be used if landing is too dangerous, but they're specially designed to land in precarious situations, said Steve Baker, president of the London International Airport, where the helicopters stopped en route from CFB Trenton.

"The helicopters can land on the highway. They will likely land 200 or 300 feet away from a vehicle and get the people out of there," Baker said.

The Griffins can also send rescue personnel by dropping down on a swing without landing, but that's less likely, said Baker.

"The highway is a good paved surface and I imagine a lot of the stranded people will be able to walk by themselves." ....

More from CBC.ca and the Canadian Press.
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Offline riggermade

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2010, 11:12:03 »
There's good use of military resources...OPP had been issuing warnings all day yesterday to stay off the roads down there...even the snowplows aren't running
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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2010, 12:01:14 »
Military evacuating 300 drivers stranded on Ontario highway
http://news.nationalpost.com/2010/12/14/more-than-300-drivers-stranded-on-ontario-highway/


Quote
Canadian Forces helicopters have started evacuating some of the more than 300 motorists stranded on a snow-clogged stretch of Ontario highway between London and Sarnia.

Two Griffon helicopters are now air-lifting dozens of people who spent Monday night huddling in their cars on Highway 402, after intense snow squalls reduced visibility to near-zero levels and piled huge drifts across the usually busy expressway.

The extreme winter weather made plowing all but impossible, leaving motorists to fend for themselves in sub-zero temperatures — many with out food, water or warm clothing.

Michael Freeman, who works at the CN rail yards in Sarnia, set out to work from his home in Burlington Monday morning and had been on the road for about an hour before Highway 402 “stopped dead.”

That was at 8:30 a.m. Monday. He only just made it to a Tim Hortons in Reeces Corners Tuesday morning after a local snowmobiler picked him up off the side of the road.

Mr. Freeman says he was able to meet up with a co-worker who was also stranded on the highway, and was able to conserve gas by spending part of the night in his friend’s car and part of the night in his own. They had neither food nor water.

“We had just stepped out to stretch our legs trying not to go cabin crazy when a local came by on a snowmobile and asked us if we wanted a lift to Tim Hortons. At that point, I was not about to say no,” he said on the phone from the Tim Hortons.

Visibility was so poor, he said, that it was impossible to see other vehicles more than 10 yards away. The poor visibility, combined with icy road conditions, led to countless collisions and vehicles in the ditch, Mr. Freeman said.

He said he plans to buy a jerry can of gas and make the 2 1/2 hour walk back to his car in the hope that he will be able to get out sometime Tuesday.

Eighteen-year-old Fanshawe College student Austin Pine left London Monday morning to head home to Sault Ste Marie for the Christmas holidays. He had driven only a few kilometres east on Highway 402 when he got stuck in the snow.

“You couldn’t see a thing. It was white everywhere,” he said. “There are lots of accidents out there. Moving vans in snow banks, snowplows in the ditch, cars that have flown into the ditch.”

At one point during his drive, Mr. Pine says he couldn’t see more than few yards in front of him and drove straight into a snowbank after the road curved without warning.

Mr. Pine said he had luckily packed most of his warm clothing to take home for the holidays, a luxury most other drivers must do without, he said.

Lambton County officials declared a state of emergency at 9:45 p.m. Monday as rescue workers attempted to reach the stranded motorists throughout the night. Declaring a state of emergency means the county can ask Ottawa for aid, including help from the military.

Capt. Annie Morin, a spokeswoman at CFB Trenton, said the military received its first call for help from the OPP just before midnight Monday. The military immediately dispatched a Hercules aircraft and two Griffon helicopters, she said, but the weather proved so terrible that landing in the vicinity of the stranded motorists was impossible.

She said the helicopters were forced to land in London, where they spent the night before heading out again Tuesday morning.

Capt. Morin said those the military has been able to reach are being taken to community halls in the nearby municipalities of Strathroy, Wyoming and Sarnia.

Warwick Township mayor Todd Case told the National Post about 100 people were brought in from the highway to spend the night at the Centennial Hall in Watford, with a further 35 sent to Warwick Township hall.

“They’re doing well considering the circumstances,” he said. “A lot of them have gone through a very tough time in the last few hours. They’re happy to be somewhere they can get food and have a roof over their head.”

He praised the local community after the halls were inundated with food, blankets and pillows for the stranded drivers.

“It’s just unbelievable.”

OPP spokesman Dennis Harwood urged drivers to stay off the highway, telling them not to drive around police barricades set up on entry ramps between London and Sarnia.

“They’re going to become part of the problem, not part of the solution down here,” he said.

Environment Canada is predicting more snow flurries in Lambton County Tuesday, with a high of minus seven degrees.

Still-stranded motorists are being told to listen to local radio stations CHOK AM1070, FM 106.3 or FM 99.9 to get the latest updates.
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Offline Snakedoc

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #32 on: December 14, 2010, 13:00:47 »
wow, the situation on the highway sounds pretty dire over there.  Glad the CF can help!

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #33 on: December 14, 2010, 15:27:16 »
Yikes.  How bad is London and east?  I was supposed to be taking VIA from Toronto to London tomorrow.
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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #34 on: December 14, 2010, 16:00:47 »
Beach vacation turns frozen night on Hwy 402
http://www.metronews.ca/halifax/canada/article/718977--beach-vacation-turns-frozen-night-on-hwy-402


Quote
SARNIA, Ont. - A family with visions of a Mexican beach in their heads found themselves huddled for warmth under thin shawls overnight, stranded on a snow-swept Ontario highway along with some 300 other marooned motorists.

The Bhushan family was en route Monday to Detroit for a flight to warmer climes when a fierce storm battered the southwestern reaches of the province, closing a 30-kilometre stretch of Highway 402.

Drifting snow and zero visibility left hundreds with no option but to hunker down in their vehicles — the only shelter available to guard against the bone-chilling night as they awaited help.

Police said that by early Tuesday afternoon 177 people had been rescued — 37 by the military and 140 taken out on buses. One was an unspecified medical emergency, but that person was said to be OK.

It was unclear how many others were taken to safety by farmers and snowmobilers said to be aiding in the effort.

"We didn't know what to do," said Suhani Bhushan, 19, who spent the night in the car with her parents and sister. "No one wanted to talk because it was so cold."

While waiting for police to find them on London Line, which runs parallel to the highway, the Mississauga, Ont., family would run the car for five minutes every half-hour in an effort to keep warm.

When the rescue team arrived, the four travellers were more than willing to abandon their car and luggage for the warmth of a nearby Tim Hortons.

The coffee shop, just east of Sarnia and south of the highway, provided safe haven for dozens of travellers. Some people who arrived at the shop early Monday were still there as of early Tuesday, said day manager Jody Mattson.

"We've had people from seven o'clock yesterday morning — they're still the same people," she said.

"They're good. We've been giving them coffee and feeding them donuts."

Jim Bradley, Ontario's community safety minister, said there were no reports of deaths or injuries among the hundreds who endured the long, frigid night on Highway 402.

While police committed snowmobiles and 4x4 vehicles to the effort and military helicopters were dispatched, southwestern Ontario residents also pitched in to get people off the road and indoors.

"It's been heartening to see the response of local folks as well — farmers and others — who have assisted," Bradley said.

"It's good now that the weather has cleared, that the helicopters are able to start plucking people, literally, from the highway and taking them to safety."

Two military helicopters took to the air Tuesday morning, and Defence Minister Peter MacKay said those utility choppers can take up to a dozen people at a time. Other helicopters were on standby.

"High winds are a concern," MacKay said. "We have also provided a C-130 Hercules aircraft to do a flyover and give sort of an eyes-on view of the number of people why may be stranded, who may be in peril."

Some people don't want to leave their vehicles and would rather just get back on the road, said MacKay, who added the federal government continues to respond with "everything it can."

Drifting snow and zero visibility had trapped about 300 people in their vehicles starting Monday on Highway 402 between Sarnia and County Road 22, about 30 kilometres east of the city, provincial police said.

In all, there were some 360 vehicles stuck.

Those trapped were dealing with minus 15 degree temperatures that felt like minus 25 with the windchill, said Environment Canada meteorologist Geoff Coulson.

Occasional 70 km/hr wind gusts blew around 30 to 40 centimetres of snow, causing significant whiteout conditions. The band of snow had moved over western portions of Middlesex County, just west of London, as of Tuesday afternoon.

London, paralyzed last week by more than a metre of snow, could pick up 40 centimetres of fresh snow before the early hours of Thursday, said Coulson.

Ontario wasn't the only province being pounded by extreme weather.

Powerful winds and rain battered New Brunswick, partially tearing off the roof of a retirement home, knocking out power for tens of thousands of people and causing the St. John River to swell near its banks.

The storm dumped a deluge of water in St. Stephen, N.B., located on the U.S. border with Maine, where town officials had to temporarily declare a state of emergency.

In Nova Scotia, high winds downed trees and power lines.

Emergency Management Ontario had issued a Red Alert late Monday for the Sarnia area because of the snow and lack of visibility, meaning the area could get assistance from Ottawa. The Red Alert ended around 9:30 a.m. Tuesday.

Warming centres have opened in the communities of Wyoming, Watford, Forest and Warwick.

Stranded motorists used the "buddy system," banding together in one vehicle to save fuel, police said.

There have been reports of motorists driving around warning signs onto closed roads, interfering with plows, emergency and police vehicles.

Peter Andersen, a truck driver from Oakville, Ont., was trapped in the storm just east of Sarnia on Monday morning. That evening, the 42-year-old reached into the truck's trailer and broke open a case of bottled water, part of the cargo he was meant to deliver.

"I just took out the whole case and started handing it out to people, to keep them hydrated," he said from the truck. "You've got to survive, you've got to work together."

Andersen said police were escorting everyone in his area out of their vehicles around 2 p.m., taking them to a warming centre on buses and helicopters.

Another one of the people who had been stranded, Colin Stewart, left his home in Tottenham, Ont., around 2:30 a.m. Monday on his way to work in Wallaceburg, about four hours away.

Road conditions on Highway 402 kept getting worse, he said. Then a tractor-trailer jack-knifed, another slid off the road and a third overturned, bringing traffic to a standstill.

Steward spent the next 25 hours stuck in his car, intermittently napping, phoning relatives and updating his Facebook page from his BlackBerry, the 50-year-old said Tuesday in a phone interview from his car.

The experience has been more boring than scary, he said.

"I've got about a quarter tank of gas I've turned on and off. I've got a nice big blanket I wrapped myself in," said Stewart.

"What can I do? I'm not impressed — it's Canada."

Things were looking up around mid-morning Tuesday, after plows cleared the stretch of road where Stewart was stranded.

Stewart said he was heading straight to work, more than a day late.

Sarnia Mayor Mike Bradley said the region wasn't out of the woods, even though the rescue was well underway Tuesday.

While blizzards and highway closures are par for the course in the area, the results are rarely this severe, he said.

"This has probably been the worst storm, and the most unusual one, we've seen in 25 years," said Bradley.

The community has rallied to help, with farmers opening their homes to strangers and companies sending volunteers to lend a hand, he added.

Emergency Management Ontario recommended that people from Lake Huron to the north, Highway 401 to the south, Sarnia to the west, and London to the east avoid all unnecessary travel.

Jeff LeMoine, spokesman for the Canadian Automobile Association, said motorists should always check the weather reports and pack a winter survival guide that includes extra clothes, blankets, food and a candle for warmth.

As for the people who are stranded and refuse to leave their vehicles, they should take the help that's there, LeMoine said.

"Allow the people trying to get you to a safe location to get you there now and you can always go back for your vehicle at a later time."


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Offline DCRabbit

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #35 on: December 14, 2010, 16:03:33 »
Why not use 400 THS at Borden.. it's closer. Unless they're not equipped to do this kind of stuff.

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #36 on: December 14, 2010, 16:16:40 »
Because the weather there is dogballs too.

Offline DCRabbit

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #37 on: December 14, 2010, 16:48:34 »
Ahh.. well, that would put the kibosh on that, wouldn't it.

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #38 on: December 14, 2010, 17:45:25 »
Just a tad.

Borden's current weather: SPECI CYBN 142205Z AUTO 29009KT 5/8SM -SN VV001 M10/M11 A2972=

SPECIal Report (as opposed to the regular hourlies) CYBN (Borden) Date/Time Zulu Automatic Weather Observation Station Winds 290 degrees at 9 knots, Visibility 5/8 statute miles (about one-sixth of VFR requirements in controlled airspace or at night; it was down to 3/8 miles a while ago) in light snow, Vertical Visibility 100 feet, Temperature -10C, Dewpoint -11C, Altimeter Setting 29.72 inches of mercury.

And it's dark, too.

This is consistent with the now-expired forecast.

Offline DCRabbit

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #39 on: December 14, 2010, 19:57:29 »
Just a tad.

Borden's current weather: SPECI CYBN 142205Z AUTO 29009KT 5/8SM -SN VV001 M10/M11 A2972=

SPECIal Report (as opposed to the regular hourlies) CYBN (Borden) Date/Time Zulu Automatic Weather Observation Station Winds 290 degrees at 9 knots, Visibility 5/8 statute miles (about one-sixth of VFR requirements in controlled airspace or at night; it was down to 3/8 miles a while ago) in light snow, Vertical Visibility 100 feet, Temperature -10C, Dewpoint -11C, Altimeter Setting 29.72 inches of mercury.

And it's dark, too.

This is consistent with the now-expired forecast.

 Hey, just like the winters there when I was a kid in the 70s/80s.

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #40 on: December 14, 2010, 20:14:13 »
I live on the west end of London, and it's been fine here all day, but I could see the storm just to the west where it has been sitting. It's 8pm local and it's just starting to snow here and the radar shows the streamers heading our way.

I have friends in the reserves here that were called out to help with the situation on the 402 and haven't heard from them since.

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #41 on: December 14, 2010, 21:46:58 »
CF's official word on the subject:
Quote
The Government of Canada was pleased to respond to a request for federal assistance from the Province of Ontario, to assist stranded motorists on the snow-covered Western portion of Highway 402, in South Western Ontario.

As part of the federal assistance, two CH-146 Search and Rescue Griffon helicopters evacuated motorists to warming stations established in the vicinity. The helicopters moved overnight and as soon as weather permitted began providing assistance to those in distress. A CH-130 Hercules aircraft provided aerial support and weather assessment throughout. Three other Griffon helicopters were standing by to assist. Other provincial efforts permitted the evacuation of approximately 150 motorists.

“The swift and impressive response by the Canadian Forces to the needs of those stranded in the Sarnia area by last night's violent snow storm makes Canadians proud,” said the Honourable Peter MacKay, Minister of National Defence. “Canadians can rest assured that Canadian Forces and our Government are ready to help them in times of distress.”

Air operations and ground efforts are ongoing and will continue as long as required to ensure the safety of all affected people. Provincial authorities have made significant progress in clearing Highway 402 to access the affected area and facilitate further evacuations.

"The Government of Canada is closely monitoring the situation in South Western Ontario, and stands ready to help the Province of Ontario in any way we can," said the Honourable Vic Toews, Minister for Public Safety.  "As always, our Government stands ready to assist Canadians during emergencies, and has been working closely with the Province of Ontario and the Canadian Forces to ensure we have a robust and coordinated response in support of this emergency situation."

The Canadian Forces (CF) is working closely with its provincial partners to determine what other unique military capabilities may be needed to further assist the motorists. Ground assets, such as snowmobiles and tracked vehicles are being prepared and will be pre-positioned in the event their use is requested. Assessments are currently being conducted to determine future tasks on a priority basis.

"Our raison d’être is the safety and security of Canada and of all Canadians. As part of Canada Command, Joint Task Force Central was given the mandate to lead the CF ground effort and is standing ready to assist as required. We will continue to work with our Federal and Provincial partners to ensure the affected motorists receive all the assistance they need", said Lieutenant-General Walter Semianiw, Commander of Canada Command ....
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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #42 on: December 14, 2010, 21:50:33 »
We had a vendor meeting today with folks from Toronto, and they said the drive was bad but not horrible from Toronto to London. London to Essex on the 401 was not fun at all, and they were a good 15-20 minutes late. The 401 East of Hwy 77 (Leamington) has been closed off and on since Sunday evening, but I think was open most of today.

I just hope by Friday the roads are half decent from Ottawa down to Windsor. Haven't seen DH since Thanksgiving! I also hope that they get those motorists unstranded soon. I think I"ll have DH get together an emergency kit for the jeep while he's here. For the rest of the week, I'll always be in town or close enough to homes/traffic to be ok. But who knows what the new year will bring!

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #43 on: December 14, 2010, 23:18:53 »
Reports say that all stranded motorists have been rescued and relocated. Only one minor injury. Now comes the clearing and recovery operation.
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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #44 on: December 15, 2010, 10:37:12 »
Here's a quick update on Military Help For Sarnia and Area

Full story Click here London Free Press

Soldiers on all-terrain carriers and snowmobiles are spreading throughout Middlesex and Lambton counties Wednesday to search for those stranded by snowstorms.

Four BV-206s — two-part articulated and tracked vehicles — have been deployed out of the Canadian Forces Land Advanced Warfare Centre in Trenton.

They will be working four of 12 sectors in snowbound areas west of London with Canadian Rangers on snowmobiles.

“The Rangers have experience working in harsh winter conditions,” said Capt. Scott Costen of 31 Canadian Brigade Group in London.

OPP continue to lead this next stage of aid to stranded travellers and snowbound rural residents, he said.

Besides making sure all motorists have been brought to safety, the military will help bring supplies, such as medicine, to rural residents storm-stayed, Costen said.

Military personnel are staying in London but the base of operations is Wrightmans Corners north of Strathroy.

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #45 on: December 15, 2010, 20:07:49 »
I live on the west end of London, and it's been fine here all day, but I could see the storm just to the west where it has been sitting. It's 8pm local and it's just starting to snow here and the radar shows the streamers heading our way.

I have friends in the reserves here that were called out to help with the situation on the 402 and haven't heard from them since.

A buddy of mine from the Tor Scot R reported the same, that he was on class C all of a sudden due to a callout.
Pacificsm is doctrine fostered by a delusional minority and by the media, which holds forth the proposition it is entirely possible to pick up a turd by the clean end.

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Re: 14 Dec 10: CF helping out in Sarnia-area storm
« Reply #46 on: December 15, 2010, 22:14:37 »
All of our members who are helping out down there, be safe, and show us proud to the nation! Ubique.
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Re: CF Helping in Hurricaine Igor Zone
« Reply #47 on: May 02, 2011, 16:02:05 »
What most people don't realize that OP LAMA is still an ongoing, but we are slowly closing it down....

This weekend marked one of the final chapters to this:

Soldiers return to Igor-struck Trouty
CBC News Posted: May 2, 2011 10:52 AM NT Last Updated: May 2, 2011 10:52 AM NT



Soldiers returned to Trouty to remove an emergency bridge erected after Hurricane Igor last fall. (CBC )


Rick Nolan said residents of Trouty welcomed soldiers back, months after they set up an emergency bridge in the community. CBC

The Canadian military has returned to a small village on Newfoundland's Bonavista Peninsula with soldiers replacing a temporary bridge erected in the wake of Hurricane Igor.

Trouty, a community of just a few dozen households, was upended in September when Igor blew apart an old bridge and wiped out the only road. The village was one of the communities where the Canadian Forces were dispatched in the wake of the storm.

Soldiers put up an emergency bridge for the winter, and on Saturday began removing it.

Maj. Rick Nolan said people in Trouty were grateful for the military's help.

"One woman came by and said it's great to see her little green ants back at work. She lives up on the hill and looking down at us, like little green ants working," Nolan said in an interview.

A dirt road with a culvert now reconnects Trouty to the rest of the peninsula's road network, and plans are afoot for a permanent bridge.

Resident Sylvia Hiscock said people in the town have much appreciated the aid.

"I guess it's sad to see them leaving, but we're happy that they came and helped us out at the time of the storm," she told CBC News. "We're gradually getting back to normal now."

The Newfoundland and Labrador government has budgeted $121 million for Igor-related repairs to bridges, roads, culverts and other infrastructure. Of that money, $56 million is budgeted to be spent this year and next.

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CF Domestic Disaster Relief Superthread
« Reply #48 on: May 04, 2011, 19:11:28 »
                                         Shared with provisions of The Copyright Act

Armed forces to help flood victims in Montérégie
By Michelle Lalonde, Montreal GazetteMay 4, 2011
http://www.montrealgazette.com/Armed+forces+help+flood+victims+Mont%c3%a9r%c3%a9gie/4728161/story.html#ixzz1LQb7bRkF

Canadian armed forces troops will be deployed to some of worst-hit areas of the Montérégie by Thursday morning to help exhausted residents cope with record flooding along the Richelieu River and the shores of Lake Champlain.
 
“People here are sick of it; they are exasperated and exhausted,” said Gilles Dolbec, mayor of St. Jean sur Richelieu.
 
“In some parts of town the water is three feet deep and people have to wear thigh boots to get through there, like you wear when you go fishing,” he said.
 
Residents have been lugging sandbags and moving possessions out of the water’s way for the past 10 days. Some have been staying up at night to ensure sump pumps keep working.
 
Water levels in Lake Champlain and the Richelieu River have never been this high, said Eric Doneys, a spokesperson for Quebec’s public safety department in the region.
 
“The river is already about a metre higher than normal and we expect it to rise another 15 to 20 centimetres by Friday, although that is very difficult to say because the river is spreading sideways,” he said, adding the last time water levels in Lake Champlain approached anything near this level was in 1869.
 
Volunteers from the Quebec division of the Canadian Red Cross are staffing respite centres in five hard-hit municipalities: St. Jean, Iberville, St. Blaise sur Richelieu, Ste. Anne de Sabrevois and St. Paul de l’Île aux Noix.
 
Several towns along the river have declared states of emergency, and police and firefighters are touring the region to assess whether more homes should be evacuated. To date, more than 1,500 homes and cottages have been affected by flooding, 750 in St. Jean sur Richelieu alone.
 
Most residents who have been forced to leave their flooded homes have taken shelter with friends and family, but the Red Cross did have to find accommodation for 129 families in hotels and inns, said Red Cross spokesperson Geneviève Déry.
 
So far, the respite centres are not set up for overnight stays, but the Red Cross is ready for mass evacuations, Déry said, with hundreds of cots, blankets and personal hygiene kits stored at a warehouse in St. Jean.
 
St. Jean resident Diane Boloten was worried about a power failure Wednesday, as she and many of her neighbours were using electric pumps to keep the water in their homes from rising higher.
 
“Everything is running off electricity, so I hear the system is stressed. I have a generator in my garage, but I can’t get into the garage because of the water, which is knee-high outside my garage doors,” said Boloten, who has been coping with water in her house since April 23.
 
Public Safety Minister Robert Dutil has requested help for the region from the Canadian Armed Forces, and that request was accepted Wednesday, confirmed Dutil’s press attaché, Mathieu St-Pierre.
 
He said priorities were being set for the troops at a coordinating meeting Wednesday afternoon in Quebec City, and the relief effort in the Montérégie will be coordinated by Quebec’s Junior Public Safety Minister Guy Laroche.
 
Water levels are expect to rise until Friday, then plateau during the weekend and should begin to subside slowly starting Monday, according to Eric Doney of Quebec’s public safety department

Photo:
Flooding along the Richelieu River hasn't been seen like this in more than 100 years. A St. Jean sur Richelieu resident surveys the scene Wednesday.
 
Photograph by: Dave Sidaway



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Government Of Canada Annoucement On Flood Relief Efforts In Quebec
« Reply #49 on: May 05, 2011, 12:37:22 »
News Room
Government Of Canada Annoucement On Flood Relief Efforts In Quebec


MA - 11.037 - May 5, 2011
 
OTTAWA – Media are invited to attend an update by the Honourable Christian Paradis, Minister of Natural Resources Canada, on behalf of the Honourable Peter MacKay, Minister of National Defence, on the Government of Canada’s decision to send the Canadian Forces to provide assistance to the residents of Quebec.
 
When: Thursday, May 5, 2011, at 1 p.m. (EST)
Where: Conference Room D, National Defence Headquarters, 101 Colonel By Drive
 
-30-
 
Notes to editor / news director:
Media are asked to arrive at 12:15 p.m. Entrance will be through the Nicholas Street security gate.


Media may join the news conference by telephone at the following number: 1-877-974-0450 for all calls from within North America or 416-644-3418 for calls from outside North America.

Imagery of the Canadian Forces assisting with flood relief efforts, will be available after the news conference: http://www.combatcamera.forces.gc.ca/common/combatcamera/home-eng.asp
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