Author Topic: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)  (Read 1357801 times)

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4150 on: April 15, 2017, 13:17:07 »
Meanwhile--start of longish piece:

Quote
Air Force F-35 Trains Against Russian, Chinese Air Defenses
The Air Force wants the F-35 to be able to elude the best enemy air defenses well into the 2030s and 2040s
 
The Air Force F-35 is using “open air” ranges and computer simulation to practice combat missions against the best Chinese and Russian-made air-defense technologies – as a way to prepare to enemy threats anticipated in the mid-2020s and beyond.

The testing is aimed at addressing the most current air defense system threats such as Russian-made systems and also focused on potential next-generation or yet-to-exist threats, Air Force officials said.

Air Force officials have explained that, looking back to 2001 when the JSF threat started, the threats were mostly European centric – Russian made SA-10s or SA-20s. Now the future threats are looking at both Russian and Chinese-made and Asian made threats, they said.

“They have got these digital SAMS (surface-to-air-missile-systems) out there that can change frequencies and they are very agile in how they operate. being able to replicate that is not easy,” Maj. Gen. Jeffrey Harrigian, former Director of the F-35 Integration Office, told Scout Warrior in an interview. (Harrigian now leads the air war in the Middle East)

Surface threats from air defenses is a tough problem because emerging threats right now can see aircraft hundreds of miles away, service officials explained.

Furthermore, emerging and future Integrated Air Defense Systems use faster computer processors, are better networked to one-another and detect on a wider range of frequencies. These attributes, coupled with an ability to detect aircraft at further distances, make air defenses increasingly able to at times detect even stealth aircraft, in some instances, with surveillance radar.

Russian media reports have recently claimed that stealth technology is useless against their air defenses. Russian built S-300 and S-400 air defenses are believed to be among the best in the world; in addition, The National Interest has reported that Russia is now working on an S-500 system able to destroy even stealthy targets at distances up to 125 miles.

While the Air Force aims to prepare for the unlikely contingency of a potential engagement with near-peer rivals such as Russia or China, Harrigian explained that there is much more concern about having to confront an adversary which has purchased air-defense technology from the Russians or Chinese. Harrigian emphasized that, while there is no particular conflict expected with any given specific country, the service wants to be ready for any contingency.

Harrigian explained that the F-35 is engineered with what developers call “open architecture,” meaning it is designed to quickly integrate new weapons, software and avionics technology as new threats emerge...
http://www.scout.com/military/warrior/story/1656513-f-35-stealth-tech-vs-russian-air-defenses

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Offline Rifleman62

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4151 on: April 15, 2017, 13:51:51 »
Another clip. Note that the USMC Pilot says the F-35 is the best he has flown including the Super Hornet.

http://video.foxnews.com/v/5399136554001/?#sp=show-clips

Inside the technologically advanced F-35 fighter jet

Apr. 14, 2017 - 2:37 - The F-35 is the most expensive military weapons system in history

A older clip, May 15 re the helmet: http://insider.foxnews.com/2015/05/12/lea-gabrielle-goes-inside-cockpit-futuristic-f-35-stealth-fighter
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4152 on: April 27, 2017, 19:17:18 »
Israel now has 5 F35's and may have used them against air defenses in Syria.The targets were an S300 site and a Pantsir system according to French sources.

https://www.yahoo.com/finance/news/israels-f-35s-may-already-184545408.html

Israel received three F-35s from the US on Tuesday, bringing its total inventory of the revolutionary fighter up to five, but according to a French journalist citing French intelligence reports, Israeli F-35s have already carried out combat missions in Syria.

In Air Forces Monthly, Thomas Newdick summarized a report from Georges Malbrunot at the French newspaper Le Figaro that said Israel took its F-35s out on a combat mission one month after getting them from the US.

Malbrunot reported that on January 12, Israeli F-35s took out a Russian-made S-300 air defense system around Syrian President Bashar Assad's palace in Damascus and a Russian-made Pantsir-S1 mobile surface-to-air missile system set for delivery to Hezbollah in Lebanon.

Israel has repeatedly and firmly asserted that its goal to make sure weapons cannot reach Hezbollah, a terror group that has sworn to seek the destruction of Israel.

In March, Israel said it had conducted an airstrike in Syria.

"When we know about an attempt to smuggle weapons to Hezbollah, we do whatever we can to prevent this from happening, provided we have sufficient information and capabilities to react," Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said, according to Russian state-run media.

Offline jmt18325

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4153 on: April 27, 2017, 21:20:15 »
Israel now has 5 F35's and may have used them against air defenses in Syria.The targets were an S300 site and a Pantsir system according to French sources.

That would certainly change my opinion of it.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4154 on: April 27, 2017, 22:42:10 »
Found a link of the new 25mm gun being tested....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8nMFvzZKKmk

Different airframe, similar principle?
Insert disclaimer statement here....

:panzer:

Offline Colin P

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4155 on: April 28, 2017, 19:08:50 »
that would be the Canadianized version  [lol:

Offline MilEME09

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4156 on: April 29, 2017, 01:20:25 »
That would certainly change my opinion of it.
Mine as well, if it can get past a S300 thats a game changer.

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Offline suffolkowner

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4157 on: May 30, 2017, 16:49:51 »
http://www.defense-aerospace.com/article-view/feature/184049/unit-cost-of-f_35s-delivered-this-year-still-exceeds-%24206m.html

I wish they were able to break the extra contracts down to the A,B,C level as I'm sure that the B and C bear a disproportionate amount of the concurrency costs

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4158 on: June 05, 2017, 15:51:24 »
1) Japanese front:

Quote
Japan rolls out first domestically built [assembled actually] F-35


As well as assembling F-35As, the FACO will also provide maintenance, repair, overhaul, and upgrade services to F-35s based in the North Asia-Pacific region from about 2018. Source: Lockheed Martin

The first Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) to be built in Japan was rolled out on 5 June.

The conventional take-off and landing (CTOL) F-35A for the Japan Air Self-Defense force (JASDF) was unveiled at the site of the Mitsubishi Heavy Industries (MHI) F-35 Final Assembly and Check Out (FACO) facility in Nagoya in central Japan.

Japan is one of only two F-35 customers outside of the United States to have a FACO production facility, with Italy being the other. The JASDF is to receive 42 F-35As, of which 38 will be built by MHI at its FACO (the first four aircraft are being built by Lockheed Martin at its Fort Worth facility in Texas) [emphasis added]. Designated AX-5, work on this first Japanese-produced aircraft began in December 2015.

As well as assembling aircraft, the FACO will also provide maintenance, repair, overhaul, and upgrade services to F-35s based in the North Asia-Pacific region from about 2018. The FACO at Nagoya is part of a wider industrial F-35A package for Japan that includes airframe parts manufacture for MHI, engine assembly for the IHI Corporation, and the production of electrical components by Mitsubishi Electric...
http://www.janes.com/article/71125/japan-rolls-out-first-domestically-built-f-35

2) F-35B for Spanish navy and air force?

Quote
Spain’s Air Force and Navy have sights set on new American fighter aircraft
Despite its price tag, officials prefer the F-35 Lightning II to the alternative of more Eurofighters

After investing €10.6 billion on the European fighter plane, it turns out that Spain’s future military aircraft will in all likelihood be American-made. The Spanish Air Force and Navy have their sights set on the F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter, made by Lockheed Martin, to replace the F-18s and vertical take-off Harriers that will be decommissioned halfway through the next decade.

An estimated 45 to 50 aircraft will be required for the Spanish Air Force and another 12 to 15 for the Navy. The program could represent spending of over €6 billion, and more than double that considering the logistical support required to keep the aircraft operational.

There is no alternative for the Navy, if it wants to maintain its naval aviation capacity – the ability to launch air power from a ship. The Navy will have to gradually decommission its remaining AV-8B Harrier II Plus aircraft, and the only planes available on the market capable of Vertical/Short Take Off and Landing (V/STOL) are the F-35s. Without them, the Navy’s flagship Juan Carlos I would be reduced to the category of helicopter carrier.

After investing €10.6 billion on the European fighter plane, it turns out that Spain’s future military aircraft will in all likelihood be American-made. The Spanish Air Force and Navy have their sights set on the F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighter, made by Lockheed Martin, to replace the F-18s and vertical take-off Harriers that will be decommissioned halfway through the next decade.

Navy officials are aware that the F-35 is too expensive (between €90 and €130 million a unit, not counting the engine) and that their order of 12 to 15 planes would be too small for any meaningful negotiating margin. But things would be different if the Air Force decided to order the same model, said high-ranking Navy officials.

The future fighter aircraft is one of the priorities of the new Armed Forces Capacity Objective slated for approval before the end of this year, said General Fernando Alejandre, the new chief of the defense staff. The goal is to replace the F-18 fighters, which, together with the Eurofighter and the EF2000, are at the forefront of the Spanish Air Force’s aircraft program...

Air Force sources said that, even with improvements, the Eurofighter cannot compare with the F-35, a fifth-generation fighter that has integrated sensors on the pilot’s helmet, granting 360-degree vision. They also allege that relying on a single model could make the Air Force vulnerable in the event of a structural problem with the Eurofighters...
http://elpais.com/elpais/2017/06/05/inenglish/1496652196_078384.html

From Nov. 2016:

Quote
...
Speaking under the Chatham House Rule, the official said that the Future Combat Air System (FCAS) will comprise three parts, made up of about 50 legacy Tranche 2 and Tranche 3 Eurofighter Typhoons that have been upgraded to network with a fifth-generation aircraft; a new fifth-generation aircraft (type and numbers to be decided); and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle (type and numbers to be decided)...
http://www.janes.com/article/65514/spain-to-develop-fcas-system-of-systems-to-replace-hornet-fighters

The EdAE's current Typhoon force is comprised of 17 Tranche 1, and 33 Tranche 2 aircraft, with deliveries of 20 Tranche 3 aircraft to begin shortly...

So in future maybe 50 Typhoons and some 60 F-35Bs.  And we have been planning for 65 fighters (how many now with that "capability gap"?) with a vastly greater air space to defend and a more likely Russkie cruise missile threat.

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« Last Edit: June 05, 2017, 15:58:07 by MarkOttawa »
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Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4159 on: June 10, 2017, 05:09:13 »
F-35 hypoxia issues at Luke AFB.

http://abcnews.go.com/US/air-force-base-halts-flights-35s-pilots-report/story?id=47947236&yptr=yahoo

Luke Air Force Base in Arizona halted flights of its F-35 fighter jets on Friday after an increase in the number of pilots experiencing "hypoxia-like symptoms."

Five pilots have reported the symptoms since May 2, leading the base to cancel flying operations and review the concerns with pilots, the Air Force said. In each of the five instances, the pilots were able to use the aircraft's back-up oxygen system and land safely.

Hypoxia is a deficiency in the amount of oxygen reaching the body's tissues.

"Wing officials will educate U.S. and international pilots today on the situation and increase their awareness of hypoxia symptoms," Capt. Mark Graff, Air Force spokesman, said in a statement on Friday. "Pilots will also be briefed on all the incidents that have occurred and the successful actions taken by the pilots to safely recover their aircraft.

He continued: "Flight medicine will brief physiological event symptoms and also the extensive measures that are being taken to analyze data collected from the incidents."

The base will also hold an open forum for pilots to discuss concerns, he added.

No other bases with F-35 aircraft canceled operations on Friday. An Air Combat Command spokesperson told ABC News that a similar trend has not been seen with F-35 pilots on other bases.

Recently, the Navy has experienced hypoxia-related issues with its T-45 training jet. Flights of that aircraft were grounded across three bases in April for about a week due to protests by pilots that the oxygen system wasn't functioning properly.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4160 on: June 10, 2017, 09:38:30 »
Wasn't the F22 also having troubles afew years back?  I would have thought this sort of thing would be something they would have sorted out long ago.

Offline tomahawk6

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4161 on: June 10, 2017, 09:44:34 »
Wasn't the F22 also having troubles afew years back?  I would have thought this sort of thing would be something they would have sorted out long ago.

The T-45 as well.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4162 on: June 10, 2017, 10:06:24 »
Of course, this isn't my area of expertise whatsoever but it's not like using oxygen is a new thing in fighters.  I would have thought the technology and equipment used would be common, proven designs with parts already in service?

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4163 on: June 10, 2017, 10:48:12 »
Super Hornet has issues as well. I believe it's due to onboard oxygen generation vice older a/c carrying liquid oxygen. SuperSonicMax had on a post on here somewhere explaining the actual issue.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4164 on: June 10, 2017, 11:34:46 »
This might be the post you are referring to:

Because O2, in OBOGS-equipped aircraft, comes from high pressure air from the engine compressor.  This complicate things a bit and conditions are different from aircraft to aircraft.  These are not the old Liquid O2 bottles.  This is relatively new.
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Offline suffolkowner

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4165 on: June 10, 2017, 12:25:12 »
I think the F-22's problem was isolated to a faulty valve on the vest. They are not necessarily connected at all just other than by the overall system

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4167 on: June 18, 2017, 14:50:43 »
The big block buy at last?  Note costs:

Quote
Exclusive: Lockheed nears $37 billion-plus deal to sell F-35 jet to 11 countries

Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) is in the final stages of negotiating a deal worth more than $37 billion to sell a record 440 F-35 fighter jets to a group of 11 nations including the United States, two people familiar with the talks said.

This would be the biggest deal yet for the stealthy F-35 jet, set to make its Paris Airshow debut this week.

The sale represents a major shift in sales practices from annual purchases to more economic multi-year deals that lower the cost of each jet.

The pricing of the jets was still not final, although the average price of the 440 jets was expected to be $85 million, the people said on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the negotiations publicly.

The multi-year deal for the fighters will consist of three tranches over fiscal years 2018-2020.

A Lockheed representative said the U.S. company does not discuss negotiations on contracts and said any deal involving a "block buy" would be announced by the U.S. government. A representative for the customers including the United States did not immediately respond to a request for comment on Sunday.

Last week, representatives from 11 F-35 customer nations met in Baltimore, Maryland to discuss terms and toured a Northrop Grumman Corp (NOC.N) facility in Maryland that provides equipment for the jet. Those nations included Australia, Denmark, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Norway, Turkey, South Korea, Britain and the United States [Canada?].

The memorandum of understanding being negotiated between Lockheed and the customers aims to procure 135 or more jets in fiscal year 2018 for delivery in 2020 for about $88 million per jet, the people said.

In the subsequent fiscal years, 2019 and 2020, procurement would ramp up to 150 or more jets per year.

The average price in 2019 could be $85 million for the F-35 "A" variant and could drop below $80 million in 2020
[emphasis added, likely cheaper than Super Hornet], the people said. That would mark the lowest price ever paid for an F-35, making this deal an important step in reducing the overall cost of each jet...
http://www.reuters.com/article/us-airshow-paris-f-idUSKBN1990S8?il=0

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4168 on: June 18, 2017, 15:41:19 »
11 F-35 customer nations

1 Australia, 2 Denmark, 3 Israel, 4 Italy, 5 Japan, 6 the Netherlands, 7 Norway, 8 Turkey, 9 South Korea, 10 Britain and 11 the United States [Canada?]
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4169 on: June 28, 2017, 08:47:41 »
Costs are climbing and the shortage of spare parts is a problem.

https://www.stripes.com/news/us/f-35-unreliability-risks-strain-on-pentagon-budget-tester-says-1.475661#.WVOkvEhtm70

Costs to operate and support Lockheed Martin Corp.'s F-35 will balloon unless the deteriorating reliability of the Pentagon's costliest program improves, according to an assessment from the Defense Department's own testing office.

The aircraft and its parts aren't as reliable as expected, and it's taking longer to repair them than planned, according to the presentation by the director of operational testing for defense officials and congressional aides. About 20 percent of the jets must await spares in depots because suppliers can't keep up with expanding production while fixing returned parts.

Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4170 on: July 11, 2017, 11:23:22 »
DoD signs contract for 74 LRIP 11 F-35s (74 USAF F-35As), likely deal for 50 foreign buyers soon:

Quote
Lockheed Martin Wins $5.5B For 74 F-35 Fighters, Anticipates $2.2B For 50 More

Lockheed Martin is being awarded a $5.5 billion modification F-35 Lightning II low-rate initial production (LRIP) Lot 11 advance acquisition contract.

An undefinitized not-to-exceed contract modification to fund procurement of 50 F-35 Partner and FMS aircraft for $2.2 billion is anticipated within the month of July 2017, US department of defense said in a statement Friday.

The LRIP 11 contract contains requirements for the Air Force, Marine Corps, Navy, international partner nations, and foreign military sales (FMS) customers. This modification provides for the procurement of 74 fiscal 2017 aircraft, comprised of 48 F-35A aircraft for the Air Force, 18 F-35B aircraft for the Marine Corps, and eight F-35C aircraft for the Navy and Marine Corps.

In addition, this modification adds funding to previously awarded fiscal 2015 and 2016 aircraft contract line item numbers for the U.S. Services. Work is expected to be completed in December 2020.

Fiscal 2015, 2016, and 2017 aircraft procurement (Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps) funds in the amount of $4,491,634,930 will be obligated at time of award, $275,641,724 of which will expire at the end of the fiscal year.

This modification combines purchases for the Air Force ($3.4 billion); Navy ($1.4 billion); and the Marine Corps ($704 million).
http://www.defenseworld.net/news/19802/Lockheed_Martin_Wins__5_5B_For_74_F_35_Fighters__Anticipates__2_2B_For_50_More#.WWTqVumQyM8

More:
http://www.janes.com/article/72153/dod-awards-usd5-6-bn-f-35-lrip-11-contract

Mark
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4171 on: July 11, 2017, 11:50:01 »
Cheaper and cheaper everyday, and the Super Hornet keeps getting more expensive trying to play technological catchup.

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4172 on: July 11, 2017, 12:00:40 »
As for F-35 costs, some details on latest DoD Selected Acquisition Report here:

Quote
...
The program’s acquisition costs rose to $406.5 billion from $379 billion in then-year dollars, a rise of 6.8 percent. But in base year fiscal 2012 dollars the costs rose to $324.6 billion from last year’s estimate of $313.3 billion, a rise of just 3.5 percent. Pick the dollars and then critique the program as you will.

The bottom line is, as the SAR notes, “actual negotiated prices continue to be below SAR estimates.”

Some of the acquisition cost increases come from the Air Force’s decision to whack the size of its maximum annual purchase of F-35As from 80 per year down to 60, stretching the service’s planned purchases by six years. The Total Program Cost Estimate rose by $11 billion, a substantial portion of the $27.5 billion acquisition cost increase. Lockheed Martin, the program’s prime contractor, will no doubt point out to Congress that increasing the rate of production would reduce those costs and help modernize the increasingly ailing Air Force...


...
http://breakingdefense.com/2017/07/marines-add-13-bs-to-f-35-buy-acquisition-costs-rise/

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Offline MarkOttawa

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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4173 on: July 11, 2017, 13:11:38 »
F-35A in Luftwaffe's future (and note Super Hornet too at end)?  Would make Trump happy:

Quote
Pentagon officials brief Germany on F-35 fighter jet

Pentagon officials briefed German military on the Lockheed Martin Corp F-35 fighter jet this week but Berlin said no procurement decisions have been taken.

Germany, which is looking to replace its aging Tornado fighter jets, is due to decide in mid-2018 about whether to start a new fighter development program or buy an existing fighter.

A German Defence Ministry spokesman said the decision will hinge largely on assessments of how long the Tornados can stay in use.

"The F-35 is one of many options we are exploring," the spokesman said.

Any move to buy a U.S. warplane could run into political resistance in Germany, which has strong labor unions, and given a big push by Europe to develop its own military equipment.

The German Air Force asked the U.S. military in May for a classified briefing on the F-35 fighter jet as part of an "in-depth evaluation of market available solutions."

Germany's interest in the F-35 took some European defense industry officials by surprise, given a big push by European aerospace giant Airbus and other European defense companies to develop a next-generation European fighter.

Lockheed, which is already building the F-35 fighter for several other NATO allies - the United States, Britain, Italy, Turkey, Norway, the Netherlands and Denmark - also plans to provide the German defense ministry with information about opportunities for German industry to participate in the F-35 program, a source familiar with the matter told Reuters.

This week's briefings took place in Bonn, Germany, on Monday and Tuesday and involved a German one-star general, as well as working groups looking at specific weapons requirements and capabilities, according to another source briefed on the matter...

The German military plans to send Washington a formal "letter of request" for information about the F-35 and Boeing Co's F-15 and F/A-18E/F fighter jets later this summer, the ministry spokesman said [emphasis added]...
https://www.reuters.com/article/us-germany-military-lockheed-fighter-idUSKBN19W16N

Mark
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Re: F-35 Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)
« Reply #4174 on: July 12, 2017, 12:12:27 »
New weapons designed to interface with the F-35. These are essentially mini cruise missiles, and are based on an existing missile platform used by several navies.

https://strategypage.com/htmw/htairw/articles/20170712.aspx

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Air Weapons: Norway Delivers Stealth And Surprise

July 12, 2017: Japan has become the latest F-35 user to order the Norwegian "Joint Strike Missile" (JSM). Kongsberg has been developing JSM since 2011 as an air-to-surface weapon that is not only stealthy but also designed to be launched from the internal bomb bay of the F-35 (where two can be carried). The half-ton JSM, with a 250 kilometer range, is based on the existing Kongsberg NSM (Naval Strike Missile). That means JSM added up with capabilities like two-way communication, image recognition for homing in on a specific target and the ability to fly very low and take advantage of local terrain to evade detection and interception. JSM is basically a small cruise missile using a small jet engine and pop-out wings to keep itself moving.

Adapting this weapon for air launch got American manufacturers and the U.S. Department of Defense involved and soon Kongsberg had made deals for integrating the JSM with the still evolving fire-control software of the F-35 as well as a U.S. partner to manufacture JSM for American users.

JSM uses the NSM guidance system to hit moving targets, like ships as well as very small targets on land. Japan wants JSM because that missile would be perfect for a Japanese F-35 making a surprise attack on North Korean missile or nuclear weapons facilities. Other nations see the JSM as more useful against naval targets or even specific vehicles moving along a distant road. The JSM thus becomes a very useful weapon for nations adopting the F-35. The JSM is also superior to the heavier Harpoon, which has become a standard anti-ship missile in many navies. The JSM has other competition, like the Harpoon variant, SLAM-ER, but at the moment no one weapon has a lock on future anti-ship missiles or the kind of versatile air-to-ground missile JSM has indeed evolved into. JSM is completing its final tests in 2017 and will be available adaptation (software mods) for F-35 users as they receive their aircraft. Each nation will have the F-35 fire control system (as well as some of the other electronics) modified to handle local preferences, especially when it comes to specific bombs and missiles and other unique bits of hardware.

The F-35 is armed with an internal 25mm cannon and four internal air-to-air missiles (or two missiles and two smart bombs) plus four external smart bombs and two missiles. A special bomb rack was developed which allowed the F-35 to carry eight SDBs (230 kg Small Diameter Bombs)s All sensors are carried internally and max weapon load is 6.8 tons. The aircraft is very stealthy when just carrying internal weapons. The more compact (it looks like a missile) SDB was designed with the internal bomb bays of the F-22 and F-35 in mind and has proved to be a very effective smart bomb.

JSM is based on the older, and quite successful, NSM. This is 410 kg (900 pound) missile is designed for use from ships or land based launchers (or trucks). NSM has a 125 kg (275 pound) warhead and a range of 185 kilometers. NSM uses GPS and inertial guidance systems, as well as heat imaging system (and a database of likely targets) for picking out and hitting the intended target. NSM entered service in 2007 and work on an air launched version led to the JSM. A major chore was the JSM's advanced electronics (especially the gear that defeats defensive jammers) and this stuff required a lot of tweaking and realistic testing. That was expected and the JSM was ready for service on schedule.

JSM is also being adapted for use on other aircraft, especially the F-16, F-15E and F-18, which would carry it externally. The F-35 can also carry JSM (and all other bombs and missiles) externally but sacrifices a lot of its stealth protection to do so. Japan may not consider this to be a major problem with North Korea, which has an antiquated air-defense system. The official reason for arming Japanese F-35s with JSM is to deal with the threat of ballistic missile attack by North Korea. JSM is well suited to find and destroy hidden North Korea missile launch sites. But JSM would also be an excellent weapon to use against Chinese warships, which Japan does not mention but is implied.
Dagny, this is not a battle over material goods. It's a moral crisis, the greatest the world has ever faced and the last. Our age is the climax of centuries of evil. We must put an end to it, once and for all, or perish - we, the men of the mind. It was our own guilt. We produced the wealth of the world - but we let our enemies write its moral code.