Author Topic: Lived abroad & Join the forces as a Electrical & Mechanical Engineering Officer  (Read 1100 times)

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Offline rfh15

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Hello,

I am a 24 year old Canadian citizen who was born and raised in Lebanon (dual citizenship).  I’ve studied at the country’s top University (AUB) and earned a dual degree in Mechanical Engineering and Computer Science with a very good academic record.  I also earned a minor in Math.

I’ve been working for a year as a Digital Project Manager in Lebanon, communicating with multiple teams in different countries.  My mother tongue is French, and I did my undergraduate studies in English.  I also speak and write Arabic.

I found my job didn't have much value, so I recently resigned to relocate to Canada. I will arrive on the 21st of March and will reside there for good.  I will apply to the Electrical & Mechanical Engineering Officer position: I think I'm more than qualified for the position, and am really looking forward a career in the military.  I also think this job will suit me a lot.

I want to prepare all the necessary documents before my arrival, and want to know approximately how long it would take from the moment I contact the recruiter to receiving the offer so I can plan the coming months better.

It would be an immense privilege for me to join the Forces.  [:)
Can anyone give me some advice to make it happen as fast as possible?

Thank you for your help,
Raymond

Offline mariomike

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    • The job.
I am a 24 year old Canadian citizen who was born and raised in Lebanon (dual citizenship).

Security Check/Level Superthread (incl dual citizenship) - Check Here First 
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=1399.25
35 pages.

Pre-Enrolment Security Clearance Pre-Assessment
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=118362.0

Birth Certificates and Citizenship (Merged)
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=17749.25
2 pages.

Security Clearance For a Person Living Abroad 
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=121568.0

Living Abroad before Joining Reg/Reserves?
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=104071.0

But if you were subject to a "Pre-Security Clearance Screening", then depending on the countries which are involved, the process can take from 6-18 months and sometimes longer.

Background Check (Merged)
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=97476.50
3 pages.

etc...

I will apply to the Electrical & Mechanical Engineering Officer position:

https://www.google.ca/search?q=site%3Aarmy.ca+Electrical+%26+Mechanical+Engineering+Officer&sourceid=ie7&rls=com.microsoft:en-CA:IE-Address&ie=&oe=&rlz=1I7GGHP_en-GBCA592&gfe_rd=cr&ei=emK9WMjfFOmM8Qfwk6igCg&gws_rd=ssl#q=site:army.ca+EME&*

As always,  Recruiting is your most trusted source of information.
« Last Edit: March 06, 2017, 08:24:59 by mariomike »
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Offline clmarr

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Having lived in a different country, you are in for a long wait. From your time of application to BMQ, you can probably expect 1.5 to 2 years to pass (especially since Lebanon in a non NATO country). I am going through the same process.
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Offline John Kanaka

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You were born and raised in Lebanon for 24 years of your life but you have a Canadian citizenship? Interesting.

Offline Loachman

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rfh15 registered on 06 March 2017, posted fifteen minutes later, and was last active very early the following day.

Offline John Kanaka

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Well if he's as committed as he says he is then he should be back. I'm quite curious about it to be honest.

Offline Blackadder1916

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You were born and raised in Lebanon for 24 years of your life but you have a Canadian citizenship? Interesting.

Why is that interesting?  Because he is a Canadian citizen, perhaps without ever setting foot in the country, or because of the country that he is living in?  What if he relayed the same story, however, instead of Lebanon, it was the United Kingdom?  Back a few decades, when I was going through officer training, one of the other officer candidates was in the same situation.  He was born in the UK, with a Canadian/Brit dual citizen father who lived and worked there and a Brit mother; he attended uni in the UK; he had never resided in Canada before he applied to join the CF;  he was processed while still living overseas, was accepted and moved to Canada for the sole purpose of starting BOTC complete with the Limey accent.
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Offline John Kanaka

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Well that is interesting then isn't it?

I have a dual citizenship as well, the second being Polish. I've lived in Canada since I was 2 years old and I am 27 now. This isn't a civilian job and I feel like in order to keep it functioning as a Canadian army you want recruits that have some kind of reason for joining it other than, and I quote:

I think I'm more than qualified for the position, and am really looking forward a career in the military.  I also think this job will suit me a lot.

A feeling of being entitled to joining the Armed Forces just because you are a Canadian citizen on paper is wrong. You don't see me rushing to join the Polish Armed Forces because I like going there on vacation and like their international football team. So I don't really understand the appeal for somebody who grew up in an arguably different culture, wanting to spontaneously join the Canadian Armed Forces to serve Canadians and protect our freedoms and values. Seems like people are joining up for the wrong reasons, just because it "looks good" and "I wanna".

I've essentially lived here all my life and fully appreciate what Canada has offered me thus far; opportunities that I would not have had growing up in Poland. As a civilian I have a sense of pride and a sense of duty. I think there are some inherent qualities that fully assimilated Canadians have that are essential to fostering a positive reputation for our military; a sense of belonging and a sense of a common goal that can be best understood by individuals that spent a good portion of their lives here.

It would be an immense privilege for me to join the Forces.  [:)
Can anyone give me some advice to make it happen as fast as possible?

How can you understand the immense privilege if you have never even resided here?

Simply put, it honestly doesn't make sense to me for somebody who has never resided in a country to want to join their military. "Oh! Canada looks good! I think I want to go fight for them." Its a good thing you can't claim citizenship status in any country of your choosing, otherwise we'd all be fighting for Switzerland.

Those are my 2 cents on the matter. I do however fully appreciate the right to sign up and I am not trying to discourage anybody, regardless of where they live and where they have lived, from applying. I simply don't understand the motives that in my opinion are false to begin with.
« Last Edit: March 30, 2017, 21:59:33 by jrogalew »

Offline Remius

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People join for a variety of reasons.  I know a few Brits ex military who have come over exactly because of Canada looks good! And wanted to keep serving beyond what they could back home.  They all served with distinction regardless of their motivation. 

I don't care why people join.  I care about how they serve.
Optio

Offline John Kanaka

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People join for a variety of reasons.  I know a few Brits ex military who have come over exactly because of Canada looks good! And wanted to keep serving beyond what they could back home.  They all served with distinction regardless of their motivation. 

I don't care why people join.  I care about how they serve.

Well said, and I agree that everyone deserves a chance to prove themselves regardless of their reasons for joining.

Offline Loachman

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I will echo what Remius said.

Many Canadians have joined the Armed Forces of other nations as well. Thirty thousand Canadians joined the US Armed Forces during the Vietnam War. Many Americans came north during the Second World War and joined before the US was invited to participate directly by the Japanese.

Hundreds of thousands of immigrants come to this Country every year. What is "the appeal for somebody who grew up in an arguably different culture, wanting to spontaneously" immigrate? And there's likely nothing spontaneous about this for either immigrants in general or rfh15.

rfh15 has Canadian citizenship for a reason, and is most likely far from ignorant about this Country. Whatever his personal reason for wishing to join, he is as welcome to do so as any other qualified applicant. He would not be the first person with a Lebanese background to do so, or to die in service to Canada as one did not many years ago in Afghanistan.

Lastly, nowhere does he indicate a "feeling of being entitled to join(ing) the Armed Forces". Nowhere. He states quite clearly that it would be an "immense privilege", and I am more than happy with people who see it that way, and who display a little bit of humility like that.

I wish him well in his quest, because he can make a solid contribution to this Country, and I look forward to more of his posts.
« Last Edit: March 31, 2017, 14:26:22 by Loachman »