Author Topic: Army to Get New Security Force Brigades  (Read 631 times)

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Offline tomahawk6

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Army to Get New Security Force Brigades
« on: February 17, 2017, 22:32:07 »
Interesting concept to have 6 brigades that will conduct security cooperation operations. The Army will not need to task infantry or armor brigades for this mission. It will enhance combat readiness for our manuever brigades.

https://www.armytimes.com/articles/fort-benning-to-stand-up-security-force-brigade-training-academy

The first of six planned security force brigades will activate in October at Fort Benning, Georgia, the Army announced on Thursday.

The Security Force Assistance Brigades are the Army’s first permanent units that will conduct security cooperation activities and allow quick response to combatant commander requirements, an Army spokesperson told Army Times in an email.

“Establishing a proponent for the new structure unifies all related force development activities under a single command to best enable the Army to grow and evolve the organization,” the spokesperson said.

Offline FJAG

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Re: Army to Get New Security Force Brigades
« Reply #1 on: February 18, 2017, 00:34:49 »
Interesting concept to have 6 brigades that will conduct security cooperation operations. The Army will not need to task infantry or armor brigades for this mission. It will enhance combat readiness for our manuever brigades.

https://www.armytimes.com/articles/fort-benning-to-stand-up-security-force-brigade-training-academy

The first of six planned security force brigades will activate in October at Fort Benning, Georgia, the Army announced on Thursday.

The Security Force Assistance Brigades are the Army’s first permanent units that will conduct security cooperation activities and allow quick response to combatant commander requirements, an Army spokesperson told Army Times in an email.

“Establishing a proponent for the new structure unifies all related force development activities under a single command to best enable the Army to grow and evolve the organization,” the spokesperson said.

Very Interesting. Sounds like the conventional army's response to the situation they created with CJTF Phoenix I through IX (followed by NTM-A and CSTC-A) when they took the Foreign Internal Defence taskings from the Special Forces Groups (which were organized and trained to conduct those tasks) and passed them on to conventional forces (which had neither the organization nor training to do them and were heavily ad hoced). Much of the Phoenix burden and disruption fell onto NG formations, units and individual personnel.

FM 3-05 Special Forces includes FID as one of the primary missions of the SFG's and provides , in part, as follows:

Quote
FOREIGN INTERNAL DEFENCE
...
2-7. ARSOF’s primary role in FID is to assess, train, advise, and assist HN [Host Nation] military and paramilitary forces with tasks that require the unique capabilities of ARSOF. The goal is to enable these forces to maintain the HN’s internal stability, to counter subversion and violence in their country, and to address the causes of instability. FID activities include the following:

- HN military assistance—Operations that train HN military individuals and units in tactical employment, sustainment, and integration of land, air, and maritime skills; provide advice and assistance to military leaders; provide training on TTPs required to protect the HN from subversion, lawlessness, and insurgency; and develop indigenous individual, leader, and organizational skills.
...

The interesting part of this however isn't so much the FID role so much as the fact that each Bde is a 500 man organization of the leadership component of a standard brigade which can then be manned up as an expansion force as is pointed out in this article:

https://www.army.mil/article/182646/army_creates_security_force_assistance_brigade_and_military_advisor_training_academy_at_fort_benning

Quote
"The SFABs can serve a dual purpose," said Anderson. "They are the day-to-day experts combatant commanders need to train, advise and assist our partners overseas, but they can serve also as a standing chain of command for rapidly expanding the Army."

The US Army has much shorter Basic Combat Training and Advanced Individual Training cycles that we are used to and turn out trained infantrymen in 10 weeks of BCT and 4 weeks of AIT which means one of these brigades can be manned up in some 14 weeks (which I know is a bit simplistic thinking without knowing exactly what support functions are filled by the 500 man cadre and the TOEs that these organizations have. Nonetheless the ability to quickly expand the force by six additional brigades is nothing to sneeze at especially since they are also much less risk averse to deploying such organizations quickly.

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