Author Topic: USAF B52J "Century" Fortress  (Read 8302 times)

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Offline Flavus101

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Re: USAF B52J "Century" Fortress
« Reply #25 on: February 08, 2017, 15:43:48 »
It's easier for the public to accept refurbishing vice a completely new airframe?

Just a guess.

Offline Loachman

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Re: USAF B52J "Century" Fortress
« Reply #26 on: February 08, 2017, 16:59:24 »
Were it actually simpler and cheaper, I am sure that it would be done.

But what is wrong with the old structure in the first place?

Online tomahawk6

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Re: USAF B52J "Century" Fortress
« Reply #27 on: February 08, 2017, 19:39:44 »
There is a story that the USAF wants to re-engine the B-52's but cant afford to. Do what can be done to keep the planes flying.All new air frames would be very expensive.Its alot easier to go the boneyard and modernize the air frames in storage. I predict the USAF will get the money to start upgrading the engines.

https://defensetech.org/2017/02/08/air-force-wants-cant-afford-new-b-52-engines/



The Air Force wants new engines for its venerable B-52 Stratofortress bomber fleet, but there’s no money in the budget to pay for them, Vice Chief of Staff Gen. Stephen Wilson said Tuesday.

Proposals for replacing the eight Pratt & Whitney TF33 engines on the B-52s, which burn about 3,000 gallons of fuel an hour, have been around the Pentagon for years. Replacement “makes great sense,” Wilson said. “If we had it in our budget, we’d buy it, but we don’t have it.”

Wilson was responding to questions at a House Armed Services Committee hearing Tuesday from Rep. Ralph Abraham, a Louisiana Republican, who said that new engines would increase the B-52s’ range by about 30 percent and boost loiter time over targets by 150 percent.

The general agreed and confirmed that new engines would also boost fuel efficiency and lower maintenance costs. “Operationally, it makes great sense,” he said. “If we had the money, we’d do it.”