Author Topic: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer  (Read 7627 times)

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Offline LPsOLB54

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Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« on: December 08, 2015, 16:05:58 »
Hi, I'd like to have more information on these two professions.

I'm interested in both, but I'm looking for the one I can see real action and where I can train a lot. At first I was interested by the infantry officer position, but then I heard that during combat, they have to stay behind, for example if the soldiers have to go into a house. Is that true? In this case, I think I'd prefer going in with the boys... But is it only when you're clearing a house or is it whenever you're in contact with the enemy?

I'm also concerned about the administrative workload that the officer has to do... What does this look like?

On the other hand, I've heard that the infantry soldiers have a lot of time to train while they aren't deployed. Is this true? What would a typical week looks like? (for both infantry soldiers and infantry officers to make a comparison)

Thanks a lot!

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« Last Edit: December 08, 2015, 16:16:07 by mariomike »
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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #2 on: December 08, 2015, 16:15:21 »
I'm also concerned about the administrative workload that the officer has to do... What does this look like?

  You're welcome.

Offline Danjanou

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #3 on: December 09, 2015, 10:37:57 »
  You're welcome.

That pressing issued of what colour are the pips and crowns going to be just won't go away eh JM [Xp.
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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2015, 10:47:27 »
That pressing issued of what colour are the pips and crowns going to be just won't go away eh JM [Xp.
  :dunno:  Hey, I just figured that the OP's inability to read any  of the pre-existing threads on this topic suggested that simple pictures may be the best way to answer a question.

It was that or stick-figures.  ;)

Offline Danjanou

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #5 on: December 09, 2015, 10:49:05 »
  :dunno:  Hey, I just figured that the OP's inability to read any  of the pre-existing threads on this topic suggested that simple pictures may be the best way to answer a question.

It was that or stick-figures.  ;)

Stick figures are only for us unedumucated other ranks. 8)
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Offline George Wallace

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #6 on: December 09, 2015, 10:58:24 »
Stick figures are only for us unedumucated other ranks. 8)

Ah!  But the unedumucated kids today can use YouTube.   [:D
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Offline Lumber

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #7 on: December 09, 2015, 11:23:32 »
I'm also concerned about the administrative workload that the officer has to do... What does this look like?

I'm not an Infantry Officer, but I currently hold a position known as Adjutant, which is a position that many Infantry Officers might have after their first few years in Garrison. Just to give you an idea, here are some of the jobs I've been working on lately:

Prepare Presentation on Voluntary Occupational Transfer Program
Prepared Presentation on Operation Honour
Prepare a summary of Non-Effective Strength Regulations
Write the semi-annual Report of Proceedings
Write Terms of Reference for a Summary Investigation
Write nominations, narratives and citations for Commander's Certificate of Achievement
Write Professional Devlopment Review (PDR) for the Chief Clerk
Proofread the PDRs written by my subordinates
Sign a metric crap-ton of pay sheets
Conduct an audit of all the security clearance of everyone at my unit
Write an article for a naval newsletter about activities at the unit
Proofread the PAO's various articles
Proofread memos from everyone on everything because they all suck at it

That's just the last little while...
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Offline dapaterson

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #8 on: December 09, 2015, 11:27:35 »
I'm not an Infantry Officer, but I currently hold a position known as Adjutant, which is a position that many Infantry Officers might have after their first few years in Garrison. Just to give you an idea, here are some of the jobs I've been working on lately:

Prepare Presentation on Voluntary Occupational Transfer Program
Prepared Presentation on Operation Honour
Prepare a summary of Non-Effective Strength Regulations
Write the semi-annual Report of Proceedings
Write Terms of Reference for a Summary Investigation
Write nominations, narratives and citations for Commander's Certificate of Achievement
Write Professional Devlopment Review (PDR) for the Chief Clerk
Proofread the PDRs written by my subordinates
Sign a metric crap-ton of pay sheets
Conduct an audit of all the security clearance of everyone at my unit
Write an article for a naval newsletter about activities at the unit
Proofread the PAO's various articles
Proofread memos from everyone on everything because they all suck at it

That's just the last little while...

That looks about right, although the weight of the paysheets for you to sign seems a little light.

Don't forget about the endless array of online courses you're obliged to complete as well...
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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #9 on: December 09, 2015, 11:33:59 »
That looks about right.....
Plus the periodic "we're one team; there is no 'us' and 'them'....but you RegF bastards did this...." 

And higher HQ's default setting of "I know this has absolutely nothing to do with your line serial, but you're the full-time guy, so bend over..."

Offline Ayrsayle

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2015, 12:14:41 »
I'm also an Adjutant (and an Infantry Officer) - This is what the "Staff" side of being an officer looks like.

I'm not an Infantry Officer, but I currently hold a position known as Adjutant, which is a position that many Infantry Officers might have after their first few years in Garrison. Just to give you an idea, here are some of the jobs I've been working on lately:

Prepare Presentation on Voluntary Occupational Transfer Program
Prepared Presentation on Operation Honour
Prepare a summary of Non-Effective Strength Regulations
Write the semi-annual Report of Proceedings
Write Terms of Reference for a Summary Investigation
Write nominations, narratives and citations for Commander's Certificate of Achievement
Write Professional Devlopment Review (PDR) for the Chief Clerk
Proofread the PDRs written by my subordinates
Sign a metric crap-ton of pay sheets
Conduct an audit of all the security clearance of everyone at my unit
Write an article for a naval newsletter about activities at the unit
Proofread the PAO's various articles
Proofread memos from everyone on everything because they all suck at it

That's just the last little while...
Leadership is understanding people and involving them to help you do a job. That takes all of the good characteristics, like integrity, dedication of purpose, selflessness, knowledge, skill, implacability, as well as determination not to accept failure. ~Admiral Arleigh A. Burke

"It takes 10 minutes to dress like an Infantryman, but it takes a few years to become a good one" - Jungle (Army.ca)

Offline dapaterson

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #11 on: December 09, 2015, 12:34:15 »
I'm also an Adjutant (and an Infantry Officer) - This is what the "Staff" side of being an officer looks like.

You left out the one key part of the job description of every officer: Other duties as required.
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Offline Humphrey Bogart

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #12 on: December 09, 2015, 12:42:09 »
If you're looking to get a lot of high speed courses and technical training, don't become an officer.  If you are interested in planning and administration, Officer is what you want.

typical career of a Regular Force Infantry Officer is as follows:

Complete Occupation Training (Basic Training, Common Army Training, Platoon Commander, Mechanized Training 1-2 years) you will be badged and posted to a Regiment upon completion of your last phase.  Your choices are RCR, PPCLI, R22R.

Once you're badged in, you will be posted to one of your Regiments three Battalions.  The 1st and 2nd Battalions of each Regiment are Mechanized Infantry Battalions while the 3rd Battalions are Light Infantry Battalions with 1xParachute Company each.

Once you arrive at the Battalion, if you did well/near the top of your phase training, you'll be immediately given a Platoon Commander billet, if you don't receive one you'll go in to an Administrative role until a position opens up which could take anywhere from 6 months to 1 year.  This may sound crappy but if you don't have a platoon you may have the opportunity to go on some courses (Parachute Training, Mountain Ops, Unarmed Combat, etc).  You'll also have time to catch up on Professional Development course (CAFJOD, AJOSQ) which will be important as you advance in your career. 

Once you have a platoon you'll command it for a year, if you're lucky you'll get more time.  I had a Platoon for 2.5 years but a lot of people don't get that lucky.  When you're a platoon commander you will do all the training with your soldiers, field exercises, ranges, run physical training, etc...  You'll also be responsible for the Platoon Administration, leave passes, range instructions, performance reports, counselling soldiers, etc...  This is your first introduction to administration.

Once you finish as a Platoon Commander you'll be moved in to a different position within the Battalion.  If you did very well they may give you an opportunity to move in to Recce Platoon.  Otherwise you'll be moving to a position like Transport Platoon, LAV Captain or upstairs to Battalion Operations.  If you did very well you may be given the opportunity to become a Company 2IC.  This is very good as you may get this tick in the box yr first go at Battalion, which means you might not have to do it again when/if you return to the Battalion.

After three or four years your time at Battalion will come to an end and you will arrive at the career point where you're ready to go on external regimental employment (ERE).  The possibilities of where you will end up are quite broad.  You could go to a training centre to train other soldiers/officers, you could be seconded to recruitment or the Reserve Force, you could be posted to one of our many headquarters to work as a staff officer, the possibilities are endless.

This is also the time when you need to start thinking about where you want to go with your career.  There will be numerous career courses you should aim to complete during this timeframe and you should start thinking about going back to the Battalion.  There is also the option of moving in to another career stream and trying your hand at the numerous specialized units that exist within the Canadian Forces (JTF2, CSOR, CJIRU, HUMINT) and perhaps moving in that direction.

Note that if you are interested in these units and you successfully complete their selections, your infantry officer career essentially goes on pause.  If you don't have any aspirations for these units than you'll want to make sure you try and get in the Army Operations Course (AOC) before returning to a Battalion, it's not the end of the world if you don't do so but it saves you the trouble of doing it once you return to a Battalion.

Upon returning to Battalion, you'll start off being employed as either a Company 2IC or find yourself filling other Senior Captain positions (Asst Ops Officer, Adjutant, Operations Officer, 2IC Admin Company).  Once you've completed these jobs and have sufficient time in rank, you may be ready for promotion to Major at which point you will become a Company Commander.  After this, what happens in your career is anyone's guess.

That should give you a pretty good idea of what your first 8-12 years of your career as an infantry officer looks like.

Offline Oldgateboatdriver

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #13 on: December 09, 2015, 12:52:05 »
Actually, unless I missed something, Lumber, who is a MARS officer (the Naval line officers), is by the look of his list of things in a position in a reserve/militia unit as the "RSS" officer, and that is a staff position (don't know why his unit would qualify the Regular Force staff officer position as "adjutant", but hey! The militia does what it does).

Therefore, his daily work entails staff officer duties only, and BTW that explains his involvement with signing pay sheets, which doesn't exist in the regular force, and his writing an article for a naval newsletter, which an "adjutant" (purely Army position) would not normally write.

Offline Danjanou

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #14 on: December 09, 2015, 12:58:14 »
You left out the one key part of the job description of every officer: Other duties as required.

That line (usually in small print) has been in every job I've ever held military of civvy, paid or volunteer  since I was 16  ::)
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Offline Lumber

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #15 on: December 09, 2015, 13:38:33 »
Actually, unless I missed something, Lumber, who is a MARS officer (the Naval line officers), is by the look of his list of things in a position in a reserve/militia unit as the "RSS" officer, and that is a staff position (don't know why his unit would qualify the Regular Force staff officer position as "adjutant", but hey! The militia does what it does).

The position is actually "Administration Officer", but having described my duties to my army buddies (including my Chief Clerk who is an army Warrant Officer) my job is essentially the same as an Adjutant.

I was just trying to make it more relevant for OP... plus it sounds cooler than AdminO.

Also, I don't officialy write any articles. I just write nice things about what are doing and then suddenly it appears in a newletter or magazine with the name of one of my bosses as the author...   :coffee:
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Offline Superman

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Infantry Officer vs Infantryman
« Reply #16 on: July 04, 2017, 16:45:40 »
What pathway has a better chance of getting into CSOR/JTF2? Infantry Officer or Infantryman?

I know its a ways down the road for myself, but I just want to have all the information before I make my final decision. And also, I am not joining on the soul purpose of being in SF because obviously I know its a slim chance to actually get in.

Thanks for any of the information you can provide me.

Offline Ayrsayle

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #17 on: July 04, 2017, 19:48:19 »
Neither - or both, depending on how you look at it.  Depends on what you want to do in CANSOFCOM.

More importantly, all trades are welcome to apply for selection - and there are many trades /occupations which are part of both organizations doing a variety of roles which have little to do with the Infantry skillset, etc.

Pick the job you (believe) you will enjoy doing, as you've already noted only a few will make it to CSOR or JTF2.  Become very good at being a member of the CAF in whatever capacity you join in - then look at CANSOFCOM if everything lines up a number of years down the road.
Leadership is understanding people and involving them to help you do a job. That takes all of the good characteristics, like integrity, dedication of purpose, selflessness, knowledge, skill, implacability, as well as determination not to accept failure. ~Admiral Arleigh A. Burke

"It takes 10 minutes to dress like an Infantryman, but it takes a few years to become a good one" - Jungle (Army.ca)

Offline CEDE NULLIS

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #18 on: July 06, 2017, 08:58:58 »
Thanks for the details Humphrey Bogart et al.

For other prospective infantry folks:

I found the most recently published regimental journals of the PPCLI and RCR pretty good resources for a look at life in battalions.

They are also useful at seeing what a career as an officer may entail outside of battalion (from page 119 in The Patrician). Also in The Patrician from page 216 are details of where everyone is posted to. I had some acronym searching to do but it is useful to see the wide range of postings available.


https://ppcli.com/publications/the-patrician/


http://thercr.ca/publications/pro-patria

Online mariomike

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Re: Infantry soldier vs. Infantry officer
« Reply #19 on: July 06, 2017, 09:14:47 »
I found the most recently published regimental journals of the PPCLI and RCR pretty good resources for a look at life in battalions.

See also,

Comparing the Regiments (PPCLI, RCR, and R22eR) and their bases
https://army.ca/forums/index.php?topic=25214.425
18 pages.
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