Author Topic: Afghan memorials (other than the Kandahar cenotaph) - merged  (Read 3484 times)

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This from the VAC Info-machine - highlights mine:
Quote
The Honourable Erin O’Toole, Minister of Veterans Affairs, announced today that two memorials will be created in the nation’s capital to pay tribute to Canada’s Afghanistan mission and to Victoria Cross recipients. He was joined by the Honourable Pierre Poilievre, Minister responsible for the National Capital Commission, and Pierre Lemieux, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Veterans Affairs.

The National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan and the National Victoria Cross Memorial will be placed at Richmond Landing, along Confederation Boulevard, as part of the new Memorial Route. This beautiful green space on the bank of the Ottawa River has views of Parliament Hill and will provide a quiet yet prominent place for Canadians and visitors to reflect on Canada’s mission in Afghanistan, and to read the names of those awarded the Victoria Cross. Both memorials and the Memorial Route will be officially unveiled in 2017, helping to mark Canada’s 150th year since Confederation.

The National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan, which was announced May 8, 2014, will serve as a testament to Canadians’ deep gratitude for the strength, courage and valour of Canadian Armed Forces members who reacted immediately to their call of duty and served in Afghanistan in the wake of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. The memorial will also pay tribute to the service, sacrifices and accomplishments of many Canadians, both military and civilian, who helped begin to rebuild Afghanistan.

The National Victoria Cross Memorial will honour Canadians who have earned our nation’s highest award for valour, listing all of their names.

Competitions for designing and creating both memorials will be launched in the coming months ....
Since it appears, according to the wording of the news release, that one won't be able to read the names of the AFG fallen (unlike the proposed VC monument), the question of where the Kandahar monument should end up remains unanswered - unless I've missed something in the news (latest from late 2011 on figuring out where it should go here) other than the monument being brought on the road until it finds a permanent place in Ottawa.
« Last Edit: May 13, 2015, 05:03:10 by milnews.ca »
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Re: Wanted: Designs for AFG, VC Memorial coming to Ottawa by 2017
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2015, 12:59:07 »
Bumped w/more details ....
Quote
Two new national memorials honouring members of the Canadian military will be built at Richmond Landing as part of a larger new memorial route through downtown Ottawa, Veterans Affairs announced Tuesday.

The site along the Ottawa River south of Victoria Island will be home to the National Memorial to Canada's Mission in Afghanistan and the National Victoria Cross Memorial. It is already the site of the Royal Canadian Navy Monument.

The new memorials, along with a 2.8-kilometre memorial route that will link Ottawa landmarks with military significance, are expected to be unveiled in 2017 for Canada's 150th anniversary of Confederation ....
More here & here.
“Most great military blunders stem from the good intentions of some high-ranking buffoon ...” – George MacDonald Fraser, "The Sheik and the Dustbin"

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Afghan memorials (other than the Kandahar cenotaph) - merged
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2015, 15:05:52 »
The latest - a plaque for the 20 Star of Military Valour winners ....
Quote
Defence Minister Jason Kenney today unveiled a commemorative plaque at the Valour Building to honour 20 recipients of the Star of Military Valour, received for their distinguished and valiant service in the presence of the enemy during Canada’s mission in Afghanistan.

Quick Facts

    Formerly known as La Promenade Building at 151 Sparks Street in Ottawa, the building was renamed the Valour Building as part of the National Day of Honour on May 9, 2014, to honour all members of the Canadian Armed Forces who served in Afghanistan.

    The plaque recognizes the 20 military personnel who served with the Canadian Armed Forces in Afghanistan, and were awarded the Star of Military Valour for self-sacrifice or devotion to duty in the presence of the enemy.

    A list of 14 of the recipients is available on the Governor General’s Honours web page.

    The SMV is one of three Military Valour Decorations – namely the Canadian Victoria Cross, the Star of Military Valour and the Medal of Military Valour – that were created by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II, Queen of Canada, on January 1, 1993. The Decorations may be awarded posthumously.

    More than 40,000 CAF members served in Afghanistan between October 2001 and March 2014, making it the largest deployment of CAF personnel since the Second World War.

(....)
More on the building in question here, and the list here*.

Still no word I've been able to find on where these'll end up.

* - In case you have to ask, some names aren't on the list because they likely work for groups that don't like their names in public.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2015, 15:15:38 by milnews.ca »
“Most great military blunders stem from the good intentions of some high-ranking buffoon ...” – George MacDonald Fraser, "The Sheik and the Dustbin"

The words I share here are my own, not those of anyone else or anybody I may be affiliated with.

Tony Prudori
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Re: Afghan memorials (other than the Kandahar cenotaph) - merged
« Reply #3 on: March 07, 2016, 14:43:03 »
... and both Afghan and Victoria Cross memorials stop.

Quote
Afghan war memorial in limbo as Liberals roll back perceived Tory militarism
Lee Berthiaume
National Post
04 March 2016

The Trudeau government is considering whether to shelve plans for a national Afghanistan war memorial, as it rolls back the previous Conservative government’s attempts to imbue Canada’s national identity with a healthy dose of militarism.
 
Then-veterans affairs minister Julian Fantino announced the National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan in May 2014. The project, pegged at about $5 million, was intended to honour the 40,000 Canadians who had served in Afghanistan between 2001 and 2014, including 158 who died.
 
Fantino’s successor, Erin O’Toole, re-announced the project — along with a separate memorial for Canadians who had won the Victoria Cross, the British Commonwealth’s highest military honour — last year. A site for the two memorials was chosen halfway between the Parliament Buildings and the Canadian War Museum.
 
The memorials were part of a concerted effort by the Conservatives over the previous decade to highlight Canada’s military heritage, traditions and prowess. The Tories spent millions of dollars commemorating various battles and campaigns, and touting Canada’s proud military history.

The focus on Canada’s martial spirit coincided with military missions in Afghanistan, Libya and Iraq. But some also saw it as an attempt to redefine Canada’s national identity after previous governments, particularly the Liberals, had long described Canada as a country of peacekeepers.
 
But now the two memorials are in limbo, while a Conservative-era program that helped communities build their own memorials or cenotaphs is being cancelled.

In November, departmental officials told new Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr that the two memorials and the Community War Memorial Program were among a number of “key issues” that needed to be addressed by the new Liberal government.
 
Specifically, the minister was advised to “Seek confirmation whether the following projects (the Afghan and Victoria Cross memorials) are to be continued.” Officials also noted that funding for the community program was set to expire at the end of March unless the Liberals intervened.
 
Officials also told Hehr the department would need more money to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the First World War battles of the Somme and Beaumont-Hamel this year, and Vimy Ridge next year.
 
The Ottawa Citizen obtained the briefing notes through the access to information law.
 
Four months later, Hehr’s office says the new government still has not decided whether to proceed with the memorials. “These are important initiatives and details are still being discussed internally,” spokesman Christian Duval said in an email. “As a result, final decisions have not yet been taken.”
 
But Hehr’s office did confirm the government is pulling the plug on the $5-million Community War Memorial Program, even though internal Veterans Affairs Canada evaluators gave it glowing reviews last year and said there was a “continued need” for it.

Hehr’s office said the Liberals are committed to marking Canada’s military history. “The Government of Canada is committed to keep alive the achievements and sacrifices of those who served Canada in times of war, military conflict and peace,” spokeswoman Sarah McMaster said in an email.
 
But the decision to cancel the Community War Memorial Program is the latest indication the Liberals are shifting away from the heavy emphasis on Canadian military history and tradition championed by the Tories.
 
Immigration Minister John McCallum recently said some references to Canada’s military history added by the Tories will be removed from the new citizenship guide. The Trudeau government has also scrapped a controversial monument in Nova Scotia designed to honour Canada’s war dead in Europe.
 
Afghanistan Veterans Association founder Michael Blois has previously complained about the site the Conservatives chose for the Afghan memorial. “But something has to be done,” he said. “The length of the commitment and the level of sacrifice that went on, there needs to be something done on a national level.”
 
O’Toole, who is now the Conservative public safety critic, said veterans have also approached him to ask about the Afghan memorial. He said the monument is especially important now, as many Afghan vets continue to struggle in their post-military lives.
 
“That monument should be beyond politics. That was the (military’s) longest mission,” he said. “And I know veterans are looking for it, and there are still a number of young guys trying to find their purpose post-deployment. And they have to know that the country appreciated what they did.”

O’Toole also decried the government’s decision not to renew the community memorial program, which he said had experienced an uptake in interest over the past couple of years.
 
At least one Ontario community will have to find other funding to pay for a community war memorial now that the program is cancelled.
 
Paul Thorne, co-chairman of the Huron County Afghanistan Community Memorial Committee, said the planned monument, consisting of a demobilized light-armoured vehicle of the type used by Canadian soldiers in Afghanistan, will cost around $50,000. That doesn’t include the long-term costs of maintenance.
 
“We thought it was important because we do have Afghan veterans in our community, and some of them are suffering from PTSD,” he said. “And chances are we’re only going to have one monument in our area.”
 
Thorne said the community had hoped to tap into the community war memorial program. It will still press ahead with the project by increasing its fundraising efforts, but having some support from the federal government “would have been nice and would have been easier.”
 
He added that Canadian veterans serve all Canadians, and federal assistance “is a matter of honouring a commitment to them.”

http://news.nationalpost.com/news/canada/canadian-politics/afghan-war-memorial-in-limbo-as-liberals-roll-back-perceived-tory-militarism

Online jollyjacktar

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Re: Afghan memorials (other than the Kandahar cenotaph) - merged
« Reply #4 on: March 07, 2016, 18:39:52 »
Hehr’s office said the Liberals are committed to marking Canada’s military history.

I originally misread the "marking" bit and thought it said "making".  I thought to myself, "boy, are they ever committed to making Canada's military, history"

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Re: Afghan memorials (other than the Kandahar cenotaph) - merged
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2016, 21:20:56 »
The latest ...
Quote
The federal Liberals are now considering four different locations for a national Afghanistan war memorial — among them the Ottawa shoreline site picked by the previous Conservative government.

The federal government hasn’t decided on a location yet, said Veterans Affairs Canada spokesperson Zoltan Csepregi, responding on behalf of Veterans Affairs Minister Kent Hehr.

The previous Conservative government had chosen Richmond Landing – a historic strip of the Ottawa River shore just east of the war museum – as the site for a memorial to pay tribute to the 40,000 Canadians who served in the conflict between 2001 and 2014, including the 158 who died.

But Veterans Affairs is also expressing interest in sites at the Cartier Square Drill Hall near Ottawa City Hall, a small patch of grass near the corner of Lyon and Wellington streets, and a field immediately west of the Canadian War Museum.

These three locations, along with Richmond Landing, were presented in July to a commemoration advisory group set up by Veterans Affairs.

Plans for the National Memorial to Canada’s Mission in Afghanistan were announced in May 2014 by then-Veterans Affairs Minister Julian Fantino. The project was re-announced by the former Conservative government in May 2015 to include a memorial dedicated to Canadian recipients of the Victoria Cross, the highest military honour awarded to Commonwealth soldiers.

The planned memorials were part of the Conservative government’s controversial efforts to inject a dose of military pride into Canadians’ national identity. The new Liberal government had considered shelving plans for the Afghanistan memorial earlier this year before Hehr said in a March question period session that it would be carried out.

The Conservative government at the time said both memorials would be unveiled in 2017, helping to mark the 150th anniversary of Confederation.

However, Veterans Affairs now says completion of the Afghanistan war memorial will not meet the original 2017 target date, and that the department’s focus for the sesquicentennial year will be on commemorating the centennials of the Battle of Vimy Ridge (April 1917) and the Battle of Passchendaele (July-November 1917), as well as the 75th anniversary of the Dieppe Raid (August 1942) ...
“Most great military blunders stem from the good intentions of some high-ranking buffoon ...” – George MacDonald Fraser, "The Sheik and the Dustbin"

The words I share here are my own, not those of anyone else or anybody I may be affiliated with.

Tony Prudori
MILNEWS.ca - Twitter